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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 16-20, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic care delivery models faced unprecedented financial pressures, with a reduction of in-person visits and adoption of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the reported financial impact of pandemic-related changes to the cystic fibrosis (CF) care model. METHODS: The U.S. CF Foundation State of Care surveys fielded in Summer 2020 (SoC1) and Spring 2021 (SoC2) included questions for CF programs on the impact of pandemic-related restrictions on overall finances, staffing, licensure, and reimbursement of telehealth services. Descriptive analyses were conducted based on program type. RESULTS: Among the 286 respondents (128 pediatric, 118 adult, 40 affiliate), the majority (62%) reported a detrimental financial impact to their CF care program in SoC1, though fewer (42%) reported detrimental impacts in SoC2. The most common reported impacts in SoC1 were redeployment of clinical staff (68%), furloughs (52%), hiring freezes (51%), decreases in salaries (34%), or layoffs (10%). Reports of lower reimbursement for telehealth increased from 30% to 40% from SoC1 to SoC2. Projecting towards the future, only a minority (17%) of program directors in SoC2 felt that financial support would remain below pre-pandemic levels. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in financial strain on the CF care model, including challenges with reimbursement for telehealth services and reductions in staffing due to institutional changes. Planning for the future of CF care model needs to address these short-term impacts, particularly to ensure a lack of interruption in high-quality multi-disciplinary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Models, Organizational , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Reimbursement Mechanisms/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
2.
Rev Neurol ; 73(10): 345-350, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The health pandemic brought about by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) has limited access to neurorehabilitation programmes for many patients who have suffered stroke, traumatic brain injury or acquired brain damage due to some other cause. As telerehabilitation allows for the provision of care in situations of social distancing, it may mitigate the negative effects of confinement. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, adherence and usability of a teleneurorehabilitation intervention for patients with acquired brain injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients included in a face-to-face neurorehabilitation programme at the time of the declaration of the state of alarm in Spain due to COVID-19 and who agreed to participate in the study were included in a teleneurorehabilitation programme. The effectiveness of the programme, understood as an improvement in independence, was quantified with the Barthel index. Adherence to the programme and usability of the tool were explored through questionnaires. RESULTS: Altogether, 46 patients, accounting for 70.6% of the total, participated in the study. Participants significantly improved their independence and showed an improvement in the Barthel index between the start (77.3 ± 28.6) and the end of the programme (82.3 ± 26). Adherence to the intervention was very high (8.1 ± 2.2 out of 10) and the online sessions were the most highly rated content. The tool used showed a high usability (50.1 ± 9.9 out of 60) and could be used without assistance by more than half the participants. CONCLUSION: The teleneurorehabilitation intervention was found to be effective in improving patients' independence, and promoted a high degree of adherence and usability.


TITLE: Efectividad, adhesión y usabilidad de un programa de teleneurorrehabilitación para garantizar la continuidad de cuidados en pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido durante la pandemia originada por la COVID-19.Introducción. La pandemia sanitaria originada por el SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) ha limitado el acceso a programas de neurorrehabilitación de muchos pacientes que han sufrido ictus, traumatismos craneoencefálicos o un daño cerebral adquirido por otra causa. Dado que la telerrehabilitación permite la provisión de cuidados en situaciones de distanciamiento social, podría atenuar los efectos negativos del confinamiento. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la eficacia, la adhesión y la usabilidad de una intervención de teleneurorrehabilitación dirigida a pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido. Pacientes y métodos. Todos los pacientes incluidos en un programa de neurorrehabilitación presencial en el momento de la declaración del estado de alarma en España con motivo de la COVID-19 y que aceptaron participar en el estudio fueron incluidos en un programa de teleneurorrehabilitación. La eficacia del programa, entendida como una mejora en la independencia, se cuantificó con el índice de Barthel. La adhesión al programa y la usabilidad de la herramienta se investigaron mediante cuestionarios. Resultados. Un total de 146 pacientes, el 70,6% del total, participó en el estudio. Los participantes mejoraron significativamente su independencia y mostraron una mejoría en el índice de Barthel entre el inicio (77,3 ± 28,6) y el fin del programa (82,3 ± 26). La intervención tuvo una gran adhesión (8,1 ± 2,2 sobre 10) y las sesiones en línea fueron el contenido mejor valorado. La herramienta utilizada mostró una elevada usabilidad (50,1 ± 9,9 sobre 60) y pudo ser utilizada sin ayuda por más de la mitad de los participantes. Conclusión. La intervención de teleneurorrehabilitación resultó ser eficaz para mejorar la independencia de los pacientes, y promovió una elevada adhesión y usabilidad.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/complications , Brain Injuries/rehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Telerehabilitation/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Program Evaluation , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Virtual Reality
3.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 44(4): 293-303, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447660

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 necessitated significant care redesign, including new ambulatory workflows to handle surge volumes, protect patients and staff, and ensure timely reliable care. Opportunities also exist to harvest lessons from workflow innovations to benefit routine care. We describe a dedicated COVID-19 ambulatory unit for closing testing and follow-up loops characterized by standardized workflows and electronic communication, documentation, and order placement. More than 85% of follow-ups were completed within 24 hours, with no observed staff, nor patient infections associated with unit operations. Identified issues include role confusion, staffing and gatekeeping bottlenecks, and patient reluctance to visit in person or discuss concerns with phone screeners.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Care Units/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Boston/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Systems Analysis , Workflow
5.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374656

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted health systems worldwide, gravely threatening continuity of care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly in low-resource settings. We describe our efforts to maintain the continuity of care for patients with NCDs in rural western Kenya during the COVID-19 pandemic, using a five-component approach: 1) Protect: protect staff and patients; 2) Preserve: ensure medication availability and clinical services; 3) Promote: conduct health education and screenings for NCDs and COVID-19; 4) Process: collect process indicators and implement iterative quality improvement; and 5) Plan: plan for the future and ensure financial risk protection in the face of a potentially overwhelming health and economic catastrophe. As the pandemic continues to evolve, we must continue to pursue new avenues for improvement and expansion. We anticipate continuing to learn from the evolving local context and our global partners as we proceed with our efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Humans , Kenya , Rural Health Services/organization & administration
6.
J Rural Health ; 37(3): 467-472, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280350

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Tracking changes in care utilization of medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) services before, during, and after COVID-19-associated changes in policy and service delivery in a mixed rural and micropolitan setting. METHODS: Using a retrospective, open-cohort design, we examined visit data of MOUD patients at a family medicine clinic across three identified periods: pre-COVID, COVID transition, and COVID. Outcome measures include the number and type of visits (in-person or telehealth), the number of new patients entering treatment, and the number of urine drug screens performed. Distance from patient residence to clinic was calculated to assess access to care in rural areas. Goodness-of-Fit Chi-Square tests and ANOVAs were used to identify differences between time periods. FINDINGS: Total MOUD visits increased during COVID (436 pre vs. 581 post, p < 0.001), while overall new patient visits remained constant (33 pre vs. 29 post, p = 0.755). The clinic's overall catchment area increased in size, with new patients coming primarily from rural areas. Length of time between urine drug screens increased (21.1 days pre vs. 43.5 days post, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The patterns of MOUD care utilization during this period demonstrate the effectiveness of telehealth in this area. Policy changes allowing for MOUD to be delivered via telehealth, waiving the need for in-person initiation of MOUD, and increased Medicaid compensation for MOUD may play a valuable role in improving access to MOUD during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Opioid-Related Disorders/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Aged , Buprenorphine/therapeutic use , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Male , Medicare , Opiate Substitution Treatment , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Rural Health Services , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Burn Care Res ; 42(6): 1275-1279, 2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276189

ABSTRACT

Initial assessment and triage of burns are guided by the American Burn Association criteria for referral to a burn center. These criteria are sensitive but not specific and can potentially lead to over-triage and "unnecessary" clinic visits. We are a Level 1 trauma center with burn subspecialty care, and due to the COVID-19 pandemic, referrals to our multidisciplinary outpatient burn clinic required triaging for virtual care appointments. In order to improve the triage process, we retrospectively reviewed our outpatient burn clinic referrals over a 2-year period, 2018 to 2019, for adherence to American Burn Association criteria. We collected data pertaining to patient and burn characteristics, as well as treatment outcome, to characterize referrals not requiring an in-person appointment. Of the 244 patients referred, 73% met the referral criteria, with 45% of these patients being healed at the first visit and 14.6% requiring surgical management. Mean time from injury to first visit was 9.7 days (mode 6), and the average number of visits was 2. Overall, mean burn size was 2%, with the majority of injuries being partial thickness (71%), located in the hand or extremity (77%). There was a fairly equal distribution of contact (36%), flame (21%), and scald (26%) burns. This study highlights the nonspecific nature of the American Burn Association referral criteria. We found that pediatric and hand burns in particular were over-triaged and lead to "unnecessary" appointments. This information is useful to help adjust referral criteria and to guide triaging of appointments with the evolution of telehealth and virtual care.


Subject(s)
Burns/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burn Units , Burns/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies
8.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 547-550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268381

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Health emergency due to COVID-19 started in Uruguay on March 13, 2020; our mastology unit tried to ensure adequate oncological care, and protect patients from the virus infection and complications. OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care activities in the "peak" of the pandemic during 3 months. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we collected data from the electronic health record. RESULTS: There were a total of 293 medical appointments from 131 patients (221 face-to-face), that decreased by 16.7% compared to the same period in 2019 (352 appointments). The medical appointments were scheduled to evaluate the continuity of systemic treatment or modifications (95 patients; 72.5%), follow-up (17; 12.9%), first-time consultation (12; 9.1%), and assess paraclinical studies (7; 5.3%). The patients were on hormone therapy (81 patients; 74%), chemotherapy (CT) (21; 19%), and anti-HER2 therapies (9; 8%). New twenty treatments were initiated. Of the 14 patients that were on adjuvant/neoadjuvant CT, 9 (64.3%) continued with the same regimen with the addition of prophylactic granulocyte-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF), and 5 (35.7%), who were receiving weekly paclitaxel, continued the treatment with no changes. Of the seven patients that were on palliative CT, 2 (28.5%) continued the treatment with the addition of G-CSF, 3 (42.8%) continued with weekly capecitabine or paclitaxel with no treatment changes, and 2 (28.5%) changed their treatment regimen (a less myelosuppressive regimen was selected for one and due to progression of the disease in the other patient). The ninety patients who were receiving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative criteria hormone therapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, continued the treatment with no changes. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that, although medical appointments decreased by approximately 17%, we could maintain healthcare activities, continued most of the treatments while the most modified was CT with G-CSF to avoid myelosuppression.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bone Marrow/drug effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage , Hematopoiesis/drug effects , Hematopoiesis/immunology , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Uruguay/epidemiology
9.
Med Care ; 59(Suppl 3): S259-S269, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the unique context of rural Veterans' health care needs, expansion of US Department of Veterans Affairs and Community Care programs under the MISSION Act, and the uncertainties of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it is critical to understand what may support effective interorganizational care coordination for increased access to high-quality care. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a systematic review to examine the interorganizational care coordination initiatives that Veterans Affairs (VA) and community partners have pursued in caring for rural Veterans, including challenges and opportunities, organizational domains shaping care coordination, and among these, initiatives that improve or impede health care outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN: We followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to search 2 electronic databases (PubMed and Embase) for peer-reviewed articles published between January 2009 and May 2020. Building on prior research, we conducted a systematic review. RESULTS: Sixteen articles met our criteria. Each captured a unique health care focus while examining common challenges. Four organizational domains emerged: policy and administration, culture, mechanisms, and relational practices. Exemplars highlight how initiatives improve or impede rural health care delivery. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first systematic review, to our knowledge, examining interorganizational care coordination of rural Veterans by VA and Community Care programs. Results provide exemplars of interorganizational care coordination domains and program effectiveness. It suggests that partners' efforts to align their coordination domains can improve health care, with rurality serving as a critical contextual factor. Findings are important for policies, practices, and research of VA and Community Care partners committed to improving access and health care for rural Veterans.


Subject(s)
Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Quality of Health Care , Rural Health Services/organization & administration , Veterans Health Services/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Culture , Organizational Policy , Program Evaluation , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/legislation & jurisprudence
11.
Am J Med Qual ; 36(3): 139-144, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214705

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic catalyzed a digital health transformation, placing renewed focus on using remote monitoring technologies to care for patients outside of hospitals. At NewYork-Presbyterian, the authors expanded remote monitoring infrastructure and developed a COVID-19 Hypoxia Monitoring program-a critical means through which discharged COVID-19 patients were followed and assessed, enabling the organization to maximize inpatient capacity at a time of acute bed shortage. The pandemic tested existing remote monitoring efforts, revealing numerous operating challenges including device management, centralized escalation protocols, and health equity concerns. The continuation of these programs required addressing these concerns while expanding monitoring efforts in ambulatory and transitions of care settings. Building on these experiences, this article offers insights and strategies for implementing remote monitoring programs at scale and improving the sustainability of these efforts. As virtual care becomes a patient expectation, the authors hope hospitals recognize the promise that remote monitoring holds in reenvisioning health care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Monitoring, Physiologic/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Humans , Monitoring, Ambulatory/statistics & numerical data , New York City , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
12.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(3): e343-e354, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154056

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We present the strategy of a comprehensive cancer center organized to make operations pandemic proof and achieve continuity of cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Disease Outbreak Response (DORS) measures implemented at our center and its satellite clinics included strict infection prevention, manpower preservation, prudent resource allocation, and adaptation of standard-of-care treatments. Critical day-to-day clinical operations, number of persons screened before entry, staff temperature monitoring, and personal protection equipment stockpile were reviewed as a dashboard at daily DORS taskforce huddles. Polymerase chain reaction swab tests performed for patients and staff who met defined criteria for testing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection were tracked. Descriptive statistics of outpatient attendances and treatment caseloads from February 3 to May 23, 2020, were compared with the corresponding period in 2019. RESULTS: We performed COVID-19 swabs for 80 patients and 93 staff, detecting three cancer patients with community-acquired COVID-19 infections with no nosocomial transmission. Patients who required chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery and patients who are on maintenance treatment continued to receive timely treatment without disruption. The number of intravenous chemotherapy treatments was maintained at 97.8% compared with 2019, whereas that of weekly radiotherapy treatments remained stable since December 2019. All cancer-related surgeries proceeded without delay, with a 0.3% increase in workload. Surveillance follow-ups were conducted via teleconsultation, accounting for a 30.7% decrease in total face-to-face clinic consultations. CONCLUSION: Through the coordinated efforts of a DORS taskforce, it is possible to avoid nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 transmissions among patients and staff without compromising on care delivery at a national cancer center.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Humans , Mass Screening , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
14.
J Rural Health ; 37(3): 467-472, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133012

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Tracking changes in care utilization of medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) services before, during, and after COVID-19-associated changes in policy and service delivery in a mixed rural and micropolitan setting. METHODS: Using a retrospective, open-cohort design, we examined visit data of MOUD patients at a family medicine clinic across three identified periods: pre-COVID, COVID transition, and COVID. Outcome measures include the number and type of visits (in-person or telehealth), the number of new patients entering treatment, and the number of urine drug screens performed. Distance from patient residence to clinic was calculated to assess access to care in rural areas. Goodness-of-Fit Chi-Square tests and ANOVAs were used to identify differences between time periods. FINDINGS: Total MOUD visits increased during COVID (436 pre vs. 581 post, p < 0.001), while overall new patient visits remained constant (33 pre vs. 29 post, p = 0.755). The clinic's overall catchment area increased in size, with new patients coming primarily from rural areas. Length of time between urine drug screens increased (21.1 days pre vs. 43.5 days post, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The patterns of MOUD care utilization during this period demonstrate the effectiveness of telehealth in this area. Policy changes allowing for MOUD to be delivered via telehealth, waiving the need for in-person initiation of MOUD, and increased Medicaid compensation for MOUD may play a valuable role in improving access to MOUD during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Opioid-Related Disorders/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Aged , Buprenorphine/therapeutic use , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Health Policy , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Male , Medicare , Opiate Substitution Treatment , Opioid-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Rural Health Services , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
16.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S3-S13, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065044

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The lack of ressources and coordination to face the epidemic of coronavirus raises concerns for the health of patients with mental disorders in a country where we keep in memory the dramatic experience of famine in psychiatric hospitals during the Second World War. This article aims at proposing guidance to ensure mental health care during the SARS-CoV epidemy in France. METHODS: Authors performed a narrative review identifying relevant results in the scientific and medical literature and local initiatives in France. RESULTS: We identified four types of major vulnerabilities in patients suffering from mental disorders during this pandemic: (1) medical comorbidities that are more frequently found in patients suffering from mental disorders (cardiovascular and pulmonary pathologies, diabetes, obesity, etc.) which represent risk factors for severe infections with Covid-19; (2) age (the elderly constituting the population most vulnerable to coronavirus); (3) cognitive and behavioral troubles which can hamper compliance with confinement and hygiene measures and finally and (4) psychosocial vulnerability due to stigmatization and/or socio-economic difficulties. Furthermore, the mental health healthcare system is more vulnerable than other healthcare systems. Current government plans are poorly adapted to psychiatric establishments in a context of major shortage of organizational, material and human resources. In addition, a certain number of structural aspects make the psychiatric institution particularly vulnerable: many beds are closed, wards have a high density of patients, mental health community facilities are closed, medical teams are understaffed and poorly trained to face infectious diseases. We could also face major issues in referring patients with acute mental disorders to intensive care units. To maintain continuity of psychiatric care in this pandemic situation, several directions can be considered, in particular with the creation of Covid+ units. These units are under the dual supervision of a psychiatrist and of an internist/infectious disease specialist; all new entrants should be placed in quarantine for 14 days; the nurse staff should benefit from specific training, from daily medical check-ups and from close psychological support. Family visits would be prohibited and replaced by videoconference. At the end of hospitalization, in particular for the population of patients in compulsory ambulatory care situations, specific case-management should be organized with the possibility of home visits, in order to support them when they get back home and to help them to cope with the experience of confinement, which is at risk to induce recurrences of mental disorders. The total or partial closure of mental health community facilities is particularly disturbing for patients but a regular follow-up is possible with telemedicine and should include the monitoring of the suicide risk and psychoeducation strategies; developing support platforms could also be very helpful in this context. Private psychiatrists have also a crucial role of information with their patients on confinement and barrier measures, but also on measures to prevent the psychological risks inherent to confinement: maintenance of sleep regularity, physical exercise, social interactions, stress management and coping strategies, prevention of addictions, etc. They should also be trained to prevent, detect and treat early warning symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, because their prevalence was high in the regions of China most affected by the pandemic. DISCUSSION: French mental healthcare is now in a great and urgent need for reorganization and must also prepare in the coming days and weeks to face an epidemic of emotional disorders due to the containment of the general population.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Child , Cognition Disorders/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Drug Interactions , France/epidemiology , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Health Services/supply & distribution , Patient Care Team , Patient Compliance , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prisoners/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Suicide/prevention & control , Vulnerable Populations
17.
Community Ment Health J ; 57(1): 10-17, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064541

ABSTRACT

Changes to community psychiatry during COVID-19 are unprecedented and without clear guidelines. Minimizing disruption, ensuring quality care to the already vulnerable people with serious mental illness is crucial. We describe and reflect our adaptations and innovations at one community psychiatry program, based on three key principles. In (i) Defining and maintaining essential services while limiting risk of contagion, we discuss such strategies and ways to assess risks, implement infection control, and other creative solutions. In (ii) Promoting health and mitigating physical and mental health impacts, we reflect on prioritizing vulnerable patients, dealing with loss of community resources, adapting group programs, and providing psychoeducation, among others. In (iii) Promoting staff resilience and wellness, we describe building on strength of the staff early, addressing staff morale and avoiding moral injury, and valuing responsive leadership. We also identify limitations and potential further improvements, mindful that COVID-19 and similar crises are likely recurring realities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Mental Health Centers/organization & administration , Community Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Disaster Planning , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 57: 102564, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039258

ABSTRACT

We describe the utility of telephonic aftercare services (including liaising with primary healthcare providers) rendered to persons with psychiatric disorders (n = 1049) during the lockdown period of COVID 19 pandemic in India. Such consultations can be continued even after the COVID 19 period for suitable patients.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Telephone , Young Adult
19.
J Health Serv Res Policy ; 26(3): 189-197, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the disruptions in care experienced by persons with Multiple Sclerosis in Italy due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the self-reported impact on their health and wellbeing. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 2722 persons with Multiple Sclerosis, after Italy instituted a national lockdown in response to the pandemic. RESULTS: Persons with Multiple Sclerosis reported that the pandemic caused broad disruptions to usual health and social care services, which impacted on their health and wellbeing. Disruptions in care were consistently associated with negative self-reported impacts on the expected progression of the disease, on out-of-pocket expenditure and on carer's stress. Psychological consequences were associated with interruption to usual psychological support, and concerns about the safety of care delivered in person. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of life of persons with Multiple Sclerosis depends greatly on prompt access to a broad range of health and care services. Negative psychological impacts reported by persons with Multiple Sclerosis with less severe disabilities show that accessible integrated services are crucial for maintenance of their wellbeing. Most persons with Multiple Sclerosis with more severe disability experienced negative impacts on perceived health. Their carers compensating for lack of social input resulted in care overburden. As continuity of care is crucial for persons with Multiple Sclerosis, as well as for persons with chronic conditions in general, strategies must be in place to ensure it is included in future pandemic response plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Adult , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disabled Persons/psychology , Female , Financing, Personal , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Social Work/organization & administration , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
20.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 17(1): 1908-1912, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-907109

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has necessitated alterations to the delivery of healthcare services. Modifications include those made to improve patient and healthcare worker safety such as the use of personal protective equipment. Pharmacy services, specifically pharmacy transitions of care services have not been immune to change which have brought along their own set of unique challenges to consider. This paper discusses how COVID-19 has impacted the delivery of pharmacy transitions of care services with real world examples from Sharp Grossmont Hospital and Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian. Procedures implemented to minimize the spread and contraction of COVID-19 such as minimized patient contact and altered visitor policies have made it more challenging to obtain a best possible medication list the patient was taking prior to arrival to the hospital which has lead to an increased reliance on secondary sources to complete medication histories. Regarding discharge prescriptions, preference has shifted to the use of electronic vs. hard copy prescriptions, mail order, and utilization of med to bed programs and other hospital medication delivery services to limit patient contact in outpatient pharmacies. An improved effort to resolve medication acquisition issues prior to discharge utilizing patient assistance programs and other hospital programs to cover the cost of medications for COVID positive patients under certain circumstances has been seen. This paper highlights the important role pharmacists can play in providing effective communication, supporting continuity of care, and advocating for patient engagement and empowerment during transitions of care in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Transfer/organization & administration , Pharmaceutical Services/organization & administration , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Communication , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Humans , Patient Discharge , Professional Role
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