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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 840, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk to the global population. Maternity care in the UK was subject to many iterations of guidance on how best to reconfigure services to keep women, their families and babies, and healthcare professionals safe. Parents who experience a pregnancy loss or perinatal death require particular care and support. PUDDLES is an international collaboration investigating the experiences of recently bereaved parents who suffered a late miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death during the global COVID-19 pandemic, in seven countries. In this study, we aim to present early findings from qualitative work undertaken with recently bereaved parents in the United Kingdom about how access to healthcare and support services was negotiated during the pandemic. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents (N = 24) who had suffered a late miscarriage (n = 5; all mothers), stillbirth (n = 16; 13 mothers, 1 father, 1 joint interview involving both parents), or neonatal death (n = 3; all mothers). Data were analysed using a template analysis with the aim of investigating bereaved parents' access to services, care, and networks of support, during the pandemic after their bereavement. RESULTS: All parents had experience of utilising reconfigured maternity and/or neonatal, and bereavement care services during the pandemic. The themes utilised in the template analysis were: 1) The Shock & Confusion Associated with Necessary Restrictions to Daily Life; 2) Fragmented Care and Far Away Families; 3) Keeping Safe by Staying Away; and 4) Impersonal Care and Support Through a Screen. Results suggest access to maternity, neonatal, and bereavement care services were all significantly reduced, and parents' experiences were notably affected by service reconfigurations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, whilst preliminary, are important to document now, to help inform care and service provision as the pandemic continues and to provide learning for ongoing and future health system shocks. We draw conclusions on how to enable development of safe and appropriate services during this pandemic and any future health crises, to best support parents who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth/psychology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Preliminary Data , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
2.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 16-20, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic care delivery models faced unprecedented financial pressures, with a reduction of in-person visits and adoption of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the reported financial impact of pandemic-related changes to the cystic fibrosis (CF) care model. METHODS: The U.S. CF Foundation State of Care surveys fielded in Summer 2020 (SoC1) and Spring 2021 (SoC2) included questions for CF programs on the impact of pandemic-related restrictions on overall finances, staffing, licensure, and reimbursement of telehealth services. Descriptive analyses were conducted based on program type. RESULTS: Among the 286 respondents (128 pediatric, 118 adult, 40 affiliate), the majority (62%) reported a detrimental financial impact to their CF care program in SoC1, though fewer (42%) reported detrimental impacts in SoC2. The most common reported impacts in SoC1 were redeployment of clinical staff (68%), furloughs (52%), hiring freezes (51%), decreases in salaries (34%), or layoffs (10%). Reports of lower reimbursement for telehealth increased from 30% to 40% from SoC1 to SoC2. Projecting towards the future, only a minority (17%) of program directors in SoC2 felt that financial support would remain below pre-pandemic levels. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in financial strain on the CF care model, including challenges with reimbursement for telehealth services and reductions in staffing due to institutional changes. Planning for the future of CF care model needs to address these short-term impacts, particularly to ensure a lack of interruption in high-quality multi-disciplinary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Models, Organizational , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Reimbursement Mechanisms/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
4.
Bull Cancer ; 108(5): 481-489, 2021 May.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179281

ABSTRACT

Confinement within the framework of Covid 19 required organizations in cancer centers, in particular with postponing certain treatments. We interviewed 6080 patients who had a scheduled appointment during this period. 2478 patients gave their opinion regarding access and organization of care, teleconsultation, their concerns and their reasons for satisfaction. While 83 % of them say they are satisfied with the organization of care, 25 % of respondents say they have given up care that they consider essential in 1/3 of cases. The concern related to the follow-up of the cancerous disease takes precedence over that of being infected with the Sars-cov-2 virus, unlike the general population, and relationships with their loved ones are spontaneously cited as a reason for satisfaction. This method captures the experience of patients, despite certain limitations. Such an approach could be used to set up a specific system during normal periods.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Adult , Aged , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/psychology , Chi-Square Distribution , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Family Relations/psychology , Female , France/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Remote Consultation
5.
Scand J Gastroenterol ; 56(5): 545-551, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have experienced changes to the routine management because of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The aim of this study was to examine patients with IBD's adherence to the restrictions imposed by society and the hospital, worries and concerns regarding medical treatment and clinical follow-up under the pandemic. METHODS: IBD patients (≥18 years) at the outpatient clinic at Oslo University Hospital were included and answered a self-report questionnaire including concerns regarding their disease, medical therapy and follow-up during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: In total, 522 IBD patients were included, 317 Crohn's disease, 205 ulcerative colitis, 386 patients <50 years. Eighteen percent were in obligatory quarantine, and more often patients <50 years compared to patients ≥50 years. Five patients tested positive to SARS- CoV-2. A higher proportion <50 years reported worries for their medical treatment and risk of COVID -19 disease compared to those ≥50 years. Forty percent avoided family, two-thirds avoided friends, and 4% cancelled their scheduled consultation at the hospital. The hospital changed physical consultation to telephone consultation for 15% of the patients. The preferred follow-up was physical consultation. A higher proportion of the patients <50 years preferred telephone consultation compared to those ≥50 years. Four out of five IBD patients were satisfied with the information about their IBD and COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic affects the daily lives for patients with IBD. It is important to develop evidence-base guidelines in follow-up and treatment, as well as patient information about COVID-19and IBD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Crohn Disease , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Patient Compliance , Patient Preference , Adult , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/epidemiology , Colitis, Ulcerative/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Crohn Disease/drug therapy , Crohn Disease/epidemiology , Crohn Disease/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
6.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(2): 144-146, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132663

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To date, there is lack of specific effective treatment or vaccine for the SARS-CoV-2, and clinical and laboratory research is still ongoing to find successful drugs. Therefore, prevention to be infected through social distancing and isolation is the most effective way. However, all the other physical and mental illnesses continue to exist, if possible even more burdened by the emergency situation and social distancing. The COVID-19 pandemic, especially in many low- and middle-income countries, has caused a deeper gap in seeking psychiatric help. In this scenario, telepsychiatry could play a decisive role in implementing clinical care for frail patients and ensuring continuous mental care. Therefore, we felt the urge to write this article to express our hope that the old health care system at this time of crisis, as we know it, can offer the chance to implement pervasive care technologies that perfectly fit current psychiatric needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Developing Countries , Health Services Accessibility , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services , Telemedicine , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/standards , Mobile Applications , Psychiatry/organization & administration , Psychiatry/standards , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
9.
Surgeon ; 19(1): e1-e8, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696084

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 presented an unprecedented challenge for healthcare workers and systems around the world. Healthcare systems have adapted differently in terms of pandemic planning of regular services, adopting infection control measures and prioritising essential hospital services in the context of a burgeoning COVID-19 patient load and inevitable surge. METHODS: We performed a review on current evidence and share our practices at a teaching hospital in Singapore. RESULTS: We outline principles and make recommendations for continuity of delivering essential thoracic surgical services during this current outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: The maintenance and provision of thoracic surgery services in this context requires good preplanning and vigilance to infection control measures across all levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Infection Control/standards , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/standards , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Surg Oncol ; 122(6): 1031-1036, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-655594

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted management of non-COVID-19 illnesses, including cancer. For many solid organ cancers, surgical intervention is imperative. We present our experience with major operations during a nationwide lockdown. METHOD: This was an observational study of 184 patients, analyzing their perioperative outcomes and categorizing morbidity according to Clavien-Dindo Classification. Strict screening required symptomatic patients to be referred to COVID centers and their operations postponed. Continuous and categorical variables were expressed as medians with range and frequencies and percentages, respectively. A two-sided α < .05 was statistically significant. RESULTS: During the lockdown, we initiated a graded response over four phases: (I) 24 March to 14 April (18 procedures); (II) 15 April to 3 May (26 procedures); (III) 4 to 17 May (41 procedures); and (IV) 18 to 31 May (99 procedures). The rates of major perioperative morbidity were 10.9% and mortality 1.6%. Over the four phases, the major morbidity rates were 11.1%, 15.4%, 9.8%, and 13.1%. On multivariate analysis, an emergency procedure was the only significant factor associated with morbidity. During the study period, no hospital staff became symptomatic for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: In a region with milder impact of COVID-19, treatment of cancer patients need not be deferred. Our study showed that with appropriate precautions, asymptomatic patients may undergo operations without increased morbidity to them and hospital staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Neoplasms/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Prognosis , Tertiary Healthcare , Young Adult
12.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(12): 1533-1536, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646707

ABSTRACT

Introduction: With the spread of the SARS-CoV2 pandemic, telemedicine has become the safest way to guarantee care continuity, especially for chronic disabling diseases requiring frequent medical consultations and therapeutic adjustments, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The age-related prevalence of PD, combined with increased vulnerability due to age-related comorbidities, makes PD patients protection a priority. Methodology: We reviewed potentials and limitations of teleneurology in PD and suggested a specific battery of tests, including patient-reported outcomes, smartphone applications, and neurological examination through telemedicine. Conclusions: These tools can provide full neurological consultations, with the engagement of both patients and caregivers, and can support clinicians in defining whether patients need to access diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Telemedicine will also carry a value in the future, within conventional health care, to support clinicians in decision making, enabling more efficacious follow-up, reducing burden for caregivers, and delivering neurological expertise to local realities. These advantages are very important when there is physical distance between patients and neurologists, and when patients are not recommended to attend in-person consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Needs Assessment/standards , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Needs Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
13.
BMC Cancer ; 20(1): 641, 2020 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a global health crisis. Numerous cancer patients from non-Western countries, including the United Arab Emirates (UAE), seek cancer care outside their home countries and many are sponsored by their governments for treatment. Many patients interrupted their cancer treatment abruptly and so returned to their home countries with unique challenges. In this review we will discuss practical challenges and recommendations for all cancer patients returning to their home countries from treatment abroad. METHOD: Experts from medical, surgical and other cancer subspecialties in the UAE were invited to form a taskforce to address challenges and propose recommendations for patients returning home from abroad after medical tourism during the SARS-COV-19 Pandemic. RESULTS: The taskforce which consisted of experts from medical oncology, hematology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, pathology, radiology and palliative care summarized the current challenges and suggested a practical approaches to address these specific challenges to improve the returning cancer patients care. Lack of medical documentation, pathology specimens and radiology images are one of the major limitations on the continuation of the cancer care for returning patients. Difference in approaches and treatment recommendations between the existing treating oncologists abroad and receiving oncologists in the UAE regarding the optimal management which can be addressed by early and empathic communications with patients and by engaging the previous treating oncologists in treatment planning based on the available resources and expertise in the UAE. Interruption of curative radiotherapy (RT) schedules which can potentially increase risk of treatment failure has been a major challenge, RT dose-compensation calculation should be considered in these circumstances. CONCLUSION: The importance of a thorough clinical handover cannot be overstated and regulatory bodies are needed to prevent what can be considered unethical procedure towards returning cancer patients with lack of an effective handover. Clear communication is paramount to gain the trust of returning patients and their families. This pandemic may also serve as an opportunity to encourage patients to receive treatment locally in their home country. Future studies will be needed to address the steps to retain cancer patients in the UAE rather than seeking cancer treatment abroad.


Subject(s)
Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Tourism , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Advisory Committees , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Consensus , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates
14.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1507-1515, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614117

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has altered the health care environment for the management of head and neck cancers. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction during the pandemic for rational Head and Neck Cancer management in order to achieve a medically and ethically appropriate balance of risks and benefits. METHODS: Creation of consensus document. RESULTS: The process yielded a consensus statement among a wide range of practitioners involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer in a multihospital tertiary care health system. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines support an ethical approach for the management of head and neck cancers during the COVID-19 epidemic consistent with both the local standard of care as well as the head and neck oncological literature.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Multi-Institutional Systems , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Palliative Care/standards , Patient Safety , Pennsylvania , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/standards , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Mol Genet Metab ; 130(4): 227-229, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548553

ABSTRACT

Fabry disease is an X-linked disease due to a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Clinical symptoms in classically affected males include acroparesthesia, anhydrosis and angiokeratoma, which may present during childhood followed by cardiac, cerebral and renal complications. Even though pulmonary involvement is not widely appreciated by clinicians, an obstructive lung disease is another recognized component of Fabry disease. Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus was labeled as a global pandemic and patients with Fabry disease can be considered at high risk of developing severe complications. The impact of COVID-19 on patients with Fabry disease receiving enzyme replacement therapy is still unknown. Many patients who receive treatment in the hospital experienced infusion disruptions due to fear of infection. Effects of temporary treatment interruption was described in more detail in other lysosomal storage diseases, but the recommencement of therapy does not fully reverse clinical decline due to the temporary discontinuation. When possible, home-therapy seems to be the most efficient way to maintain enzyme replacement therapy access during pandemic. Sentence take-home message: Home-therapy, when possible, seems to be the most efficient way to maintain enzyme replacement therapy access during pandemic in patients with Fabry disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Enzyme Replacement Therapy/standards , Fabry Disease/therapy , Home Infusion Therapy/standards , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enzyme Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Fabry Disease/complications , Fabry Disease/diagnosis , Female , Home Infusion Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infusions, Intravenous , Isoenzymes/administration & dosage , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , alpha-Galactosidase/administration & dosage
16.
Oncologist ; 25(7): e1013-e1020, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-506429

ABSTRACT

Northern Italy has been one of the European regions reporting the highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths. The pandemic spread has challenged the National Health System, requiring reallocation of most of the available health care resources to treat COVID-19-positive patients, generating a competition with other health care needs, including cancer. Patients with cancer are at higher risk of developing critical illness after COVID-19 infection. Thus, mitigation strategies should be adopted to reduce the likelihood of infection in all patients with cancer. At the same time, suboptimal care and treatments may result in worse cancer-related outcome. In this article, we attempt to estimate the individual risk-benefit balance to define personalized strategies for optimal breast cancer management, avoiding as much as possible a general untailored approach. We discuss and report the strategies our Breast Unit adopted from the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak to ensure the continuum of the best possible cancer care for our patients while mitigating the risk of infection, despite limited health care resources. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Managing patients with breast cancer during the COVID-19 outbreak is challenging. The present work highlights the need to estimate the individual patient risk of infection, which depends on both epidemiological considerations and individual clinical characteristics. The management of patients with breast cancer should be adapted and personalized according to the balance between COVID-19-related risk and the expected benefit of treatments. This work also provides useful suggestions on the modality of patient triage, the conduct of clinical trials, the management of an oncologic team, and the approach to patients' and health workers' psychological distress.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design/standards , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
17.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 49(7): 101805, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-262481

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In the context of the stage 3 SARS-Cov-2 epidemic situation, it is necessary to put forward a method of rapid response for an HAS position statement in order to answer to the requests from the French Ministry of Solidarity and Health, healthcare professionals and/or health system users' associations, concerning post-natal follow-up for women and neonates during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A simplified 7-step process that favours HAS collaboration with experts (healthcare professionals, health system users' associations, scientific societies etc.), the restrictive selection of available evidence and the use of digital means of communication. A short and specific dissemination format, which can be quickly updated in view of the changes in available data has been chosen.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Postnatal Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/standards , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Breast Feeding/methods , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Information Dissemination/methods , Neonatal Screening/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge/standards , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Postnatal Care/organization & administration , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Br J Cancer ; 123(1): 3-4, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72397

ABSTRACT

In response to our current global pandemic, unprecedented healthcare changes may have significant consequences for cancer patients in the United Kingdom. We explore why cancer patients may be more susceptible to severe infection and complications, highlighting various interventions that may help to ensure continuity of care in this unique cohort.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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