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2.
Kidney360 ; 2(7): 1152-1155, 2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776829

ABSTRACT

AKI frequently occurs in patients with COVID-19, and kidney injury severe enough to require RRT is a common complication among patients who are critically ill. During the surge of the pandemic, there was a high demand for dialysate for continuous RRT, and this increase in demand, coupled with vulnerabilities in the supply chain, necessitated alternative approaches, including internal production of dialysate. Using a standard hemodialysis machine and off-the-shelf supplies, as per Food and Drug Administration guidelines, we developed a method for on-site dialysate production that is adaptable and can be used to fill multiple bags at once. The use of a central reverse osmosis unit, dedicated hemodialysis machine, sterile bags with separate ports for fill and use, and frequent testing will ensure stability, sterility, and-therefore-safety of the produced dialysate. The dialysate made in house was tested and it showed both stability and sterility for at least 30 hours. This detailed description of our process for generating dialysate can serve as a guide for other programs experiencing similar vulnerabilities in the demand versus supply of dialysate.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Dialysis Solutions , Humans , Pandemics , United States
3.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 32(3): 869-874, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662746

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection associated with multisystemic involvement including renal manifestations has been described in the literature. The recent data show a high mortality rate of 60%-90% once renal function begins to deteriorate. We report on three patients who were admitted to intensive care unit due to severe COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome and developed distal renal tubular acidosis. The three COVID-19 patients had hyperchloremic acidosis which was investigated thoroughly through a biochemical analysis of arterial blood gases and urine test as well as serological tests for autoimmune diseases and chronic infections, in addition to renal ultrasound. Metabolic acidosis was managed through repeated doses of intravenous sodium bicarbonate therapy; however, continuous renal replacement therapy was initiated for two refractory cases. We found that severe COVID-19 infection may be accompanied by hyperchloremic acidosis due to the cytopathic damage of the distal renal tubules, making the buffering system nonefficient and if not managed adequately, it may lead to poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Acidosis, Renal Tubular/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Acidosis, Renal Tubular/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Critical Illness , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Distal , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 32(3): 794-797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662744

ABSTRACT

The first case of Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was confirmed in the city of Qatif in March 2020. As a result, Qatif was placed under lockdown for two months in an attempt to prevent the widespread of COVID-19. Doing hemodialysis (HD) during lockdown was a new and challenging experience that we recently have faced. Swift arrangements were made to accommodate patients with end-stage renal disease in need for HD. The challenges to healthcare facilities, healthcare providers, and patients are discussed with the hope that this experience would help mitigate some of the difficulties healthcare providers may face in a similar situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
6.
J Crit Care ; 67: 126-131, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n = 97) treated with RCA-CRRT. Efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT were compared between COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively; log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to intensified systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45-61) vs. 47 (IQR 41-58) seconds, respectively; p < 0.001). A significantly higher incidence of metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia, consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively; p = 0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. CONCLUSIONS: RCA-CRRT in COVID-19 patients with intensified systemic anticoagulation provides an adequate filter lifespan. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. TRIAL REGISTRATION (LOCAL AUTHORITY): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin); date of registration 08.10.2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Citrates , Citric Acid/adverse effects , Critical Illness , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Semin Dial ; 34(6): 457-471, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376444

ABSTRACT

Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in sepsis does have a role in removing excessive fluid, and also role in removal of mediators although not proven today, and to allow fluid space in order to feed. In these conditions, continuous renal replacement therapy can improve morbidity but never mortality so far. Regarding sepsis, timing has become a more important issue after decades and is currently more discussed than dosing. Rationale of blood purification has evolved a lot in the last years regarding sepsis with the discovery of many types of sorbent allowing ideas from science fiction to become reality in 2021. Undoubtedly, COVID-19 has reactivated the interest of blood purification in sepsis but also in COVID-19. Burn is even more dependent about removal of excessive fluid as compared to sepsis. Regarding cardiac failure, ultrafiltration can improve the quality of life and morbidity when diuretics are becoming inefficient but can never improve mortality. Regarding brain injury, CRRTs have several advantages as compared to intermittent hemodialysis. In liver failure, there have been no randomized controlled trials to examine whether single-pass albumin dialysis offers advantages over standard supportive care, and there is always the cost of albumin.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Burns , COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Heart Failure , Liver Failure , Sepsis , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/therapy
9.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 299, 2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367680

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may predispose patients to thrombotic events. The best anticoagulation strategy for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in such patients is still under debate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact that different anticoagulation protocols have on filter clotting risk. METHODS: This was a retrospective observational study comparing two different anticoagulation strategies (citrate only and citrate plus intravenous infusion of unfractionated heparin) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), associated or not with COVID-19 (COV + AKI and COV - AKI, respectively), who were submitted to CRRT. Filter clotting risks were compared among groups. RESULTS: Between January 2019 and July 2020, 238 patients were evaluated: 188 in the COV + AKI group and 50 in the COV - AKI group. Filter clotting during the first filter use occurred in 111 patients (46.6%). Heparin use conferred protection against filter clotting (HR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.25-0.55), resulting in longer filter survival. Bleeding events and the need for blood transfusion were similar between the citrate only and citrate plus unfractionated heparin strategies. In-hospital mortality was higher among the COV + AKI patients than among the COV - AKI patients, although it was similar between the COV + AKI patients who received heparin and those who did not. Filter clotting was more common in patients with D-dimer levels above the median (5990 ng/ml). In the multivariate analysis, heparin was associated with a lower risk of filter clotting (HR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.18-0.43), whereas an elevated D-dimer level and high hemoglobin were found to be risk factors for circuit clotting. A diagnosis of COVID-19 was marginally associated with an increased risk of circuit clotting (HR = 2.15, 95% CI 0.99-4.68). CONCLUSIONS: In COV + AKI patients, adding systemic heparin to standard regional citrate anticoagulation may prolong CRRT filter patency by reducing clotting risk with a low risk of complications.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/drug therapy , Citric Acid/pharmacology , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/instrumentation , Heparin/pharmacology , Micropore Filters/standards , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Citric Acid/adverse effects , Citric Acid/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Micropore Filters/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies
10.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 45(6): 325-331, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343315

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19, particularly the association of renal replacement therapy to mortality. DESIGN: A single-center prospective observational study was carried out. SETTING: ICU of a tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Consecutive adults with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU. INTERVENTION: Renal replacement therapy. MAIN VARIABLES OF INTEREST: Demographic data, medical history, illness severity, type of oxygen therapy, laboratory data and use of renal replacement therapy to generate a logistic regression model describing independent risk factors for mortality. RESULTS: Of the total of 166 patients, 51% were mechanically ventilated and 26% required renal replacement therapy. The overall hospital mortality rate was 36%, versus 56% for those requiring renal replacement therapy, and 68% for those with both mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy. The logistic regression model identified four independent risk factors for mortality: age (adjusted OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.8-4.4] for every 10-year increase), mechanical ventilation (4.2 [1.7-10.6]), need for continuous venovenous hemofiltration (2.3 [1.3-4.0]) and C-reactive protein (1.1 [1.0-1.2] for every 10mg/L increase). CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort, acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy was associated to a high mortality rate similar to that associated to the need for mechanical ventilation, while multiorgan failure necessitating both techniques implied an extremely high mortality risk.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/therapy , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Comorbidity , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , District of Columbia/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Risk Factors , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome
11.
Clin Nephrol ; 96(4): 207-215, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302710

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has become an important multiple organ support therapy and it is widely used in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to clarify the association between CRRT and 28-day mortality in critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (-COVID-19) patients receiving mechanical ventilation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 112 respiratory decompensated critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to a COVID-19-designated ICU were included in this retrospective cohort study. Data on demographic information, comorbidities, laboratory findings upon ICU admission, and clinical outcomes were collected. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model were applied to determine the potential risk factors associated with 28-day mortality. RESULTS: The median age was 65.7 years, 67.8% were males, and 58.9% patients had at least one comorbidity. The median scores of the Charlson Comorbidity Index and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) were 3 and 7, respectively. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurred in 57 critically ill patients upon ICU admission; 43 patients were classified as stage 2 - 3 AKI, and 36 patients were treated with CRRT. Age > 65 years, high SOFA score, damaged cardiac function, poor nutrition, and severe infection were significantly associated with increased 28-day mortality. AKI patients receiving CRRT had lower 28-day mortality compared with those not receiving CRRT (HR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.21 - 0.58, p < 0.001). Initiating CRRT within 72 hours after mechanical ventilation did not improve survival after CRRT initiation. CONCLUSION: AKI prevalence and 28-day mortality are high in critically ill patients with COVID-19 receiving mechanical ventilation. CRRT plays a part in decreasing the mortality of critically ill COVID-19 patients with AKI receiving mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Aged , Critical Illness , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Renal Replacement Therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5742-5755, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296839

ABSTRACT

Some previous studies suggested that the plasma exchange (PE) and hemoperfusion (HP) played a cardinal role in the treatment of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases by diminishing the cytokine storm. This study aimed to assess the effects of PE and HP on cytokine storms in patients with severe COVID-19 through a systematic scoping review. Four Electronic databases (Medline [accessed from PubMed], Scopus, Science Direct, and Cochrane library) were searched systematically on February 2, 2021, using MESH terms and related keywords in the English language. Considering the titles and abstracts, unrelated studies were excluded. The full texts of the remained studies were evaluated by authors, independently. Then, their findings were assessed and reported. A total of 755 articles were obtained within the first step of searching, and 518 remained after removing the duplications. Through the title and abstract screening, 438 were removed. Of the rest, 59 papers were excluded. Finally, after reading the full text of the remained articles, 21 were included in data extraction. Most of the previously reported evidence were case reports and case series. Findings were summarized in two categories. The first category encompassed nine studies regarding HP and continuous renal replacement therapy, and the second category included twelve studies about PE. The results revealed that HP and PE within the cytokine storm phase would be beneficial with a high probability in the treatment of severely ill COVID-19 patients. Highlights Some studies showed that plasma exchange (PE) and hemoperfusion (HP) played an important role in the treatment of patients with severe COVID-19 disease. The results of this systematic scoping review revealed that HP and PE within the cytokine storm phase would be beneficial with a high probability in the treatment of severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hemoperfusion , Plasma Exchange , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
14.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(2): 440-447, 2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211943

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in Turkey on March 10, 2020 and the number of the patients are increasing day by day. Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) has high mortality rates in intensive care units (ICUs). We aimed to describe the demographic characteristics, comorbidities, treatment protocols, and clinical outcomes among the critically ill patients admitted to the ICU of our hospital. Materials and methods: This cohort study included 103 consecutive patients who had laboratory confirmed Covid-19 and admitted to ICU of Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital between March 19 and April 13, 2020. The final date of the follow-up was April 18. Results: The mean age of the patients was 69.6 ± 14.1 years. Most of the patients had increased CRP (99%), serum ferritin (73.8%), d-dimer (82.5%), and hs-troponin levels (38.8%). 34 patients (33%) had lymphocytopenia, 24 patients (23.3%) had thrombocytopenia. 63 patients (61.2%) developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 31 patients (30.1%) had acute kidney injury, and 52 patients (50.5%) had multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) during follow-up. Sixty-two patients (60.2%) received mechanical ventilation. As of April 18, of the 103 patients, 52 (50.5%) had died, 30 (29.1%) had been discharged from the ICU, 21 (20.4%) were still in the ICU. Conclusions: Covid-19 has high mortality rates in ICU. Patients with elevated procalcitonin, hs-troponin, d-dimer, and CRP levels and lower platelet count at admission have higher mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Ferritins/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Lymphopenia/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Platelet Count , Procalcitonin/metabolism , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Troponin/metabolism , Turkey
15.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 141, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195914

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection has been associated with a hypercoagulable state with increased reports of thrombotic events. Acute kidney injury requiring dialysis is common in critically ill patients and circuit clotting compromises efficacy of treatment. This study aims to analyze the circuit life and circuit clotting during continuous kidney replacement therapy (CKRT) and intermittent hemodialysis in patients with and without COVID-19. METHODS: This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study in critically ill patients undergoing CKRT or intermittent hemodialysis between 1 February 2020 to 22 May 2020. Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with COVID-19 infection and contemporary controls who tested negative were included. Co-primary outcomes were functional circuit life for patients on CKRT and all circuit clotting events for patients on CKRT and/or intermittent hemodialysis. RESULTS: Seventy CKRT circuits and 32 intermittent hemodialysis sessions for 12 COVID-19 cases and 22 CKRT circuits and 18 intermittent hemodialysis sessions for 15 controls were analyzed. CKRT circuit clotting was more common in the COVID-19 group compared to the control group (64% vs 36%, p = 0.02), despite higher anticoagulation use in the COVID-19 group (41% vs 14%, p = 0.02). Functional CKRT circuit life was similar in COVID-19 patients and controls (median 11 vs 12 h, p = 0.69). On Cox regression analysis, circuit clotting was similar with hazard ratio (HR) 1.90 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89-4.04]; however, clotting was increased in COVID-19 patients after adjustment for anticoagulation use (HR: 3.31 [95% CI 1.49-7.33]). In patients with COVID-19, CKRT circuits with anticoagulation had a longer circuit life compared to CKRT circuits without anticoagulation (median 22 versus 7 h respectively, p <  0.001). Circuit clotting was similar in both groups undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. CONCLUSION: Dialysis clotting amongst COVID-19 patients is increased despite more anticoagulation use and the hazard for clotting is greater especially after adjusting for anticoagulation use. Circuit life was suboptimal in COVID-19 patients on circuits without anticoagulation and therefore routine use of anticoagulation amongst COVID-19 patients should be considered whenever possible.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidneys, Artificial , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Citric Acid/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/prevention & control
16.
J Crit Care ; 64: 125-130, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outcome for critically ill patients with COVID-19 treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is largely unknown. We describe mortality and renal outcome in this group. METHODS: This observational study was conducted at a university hospital in Sweden. We studied critically ill adult COVID-19 patients with Acute Kidney injury (AKI) who received CRRT. RESULTS: In 451 patients, AKI incidence was 43.7%. 18.2% received CRRT. Median age of CRRT patients was 60 years (IQR 54-65), 90% were male, median BMI was 29 (IQR 25-32), 23.2% had Diabetes, 37.8% hypertension and 6.1% chronic kidney disease prior to admission. 100% required mechanical ventilation. 8.5% received Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation. Median length of stay was 23 days (IQR 15-26). ICU mortality was 39% and 90-day mortality was 45.1%. Age, baseline creatinine values and body weight change were associated with 60 days mortality. Of the survivors, no patients required dialysis at hospital discharge, 73.8% recovered renal function and a median 10.5% of body weight was lost during admission. CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill COVID-19 patients with AKI who received CRRT had a 90-day mortality of 45.1%. At follow-up, three quarters of survivors had recovered renal function. This information is important in the clinical management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Survival Analysis , Sweden/epidemiology , Weight Loss
17.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(7): 9243-9252, 2021 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread rapidly since 2019. Approximately 15% of the patients will develop severe complications such as multiple organ disease syndrome related to cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) can remove inflammatory cytokines through filtration or adsorption. We evaluated the effectiveness of CRRT in COVID-19 patients with CRS. METHODS: This retrospective, multicenter, descriptive study included 83 patients with CRS from three hospitals in Wuhan. RESULTS: In COVID-19 patients with CRS, the fatality rate was even higher in CRRT group (P=0.005). However, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, neutrophil counts, and D-dimer decreased after CRRT (P<0.05). Results of Lasso model showed that tracheotomy (ß -1.31) and convalescent plasma (ß -1.41) were the protective factors. In contrast, CRRT (ß 1.07), respiratory failure (ß 1.61), consolidation on lung CT (ß 0.48), acute kidney injury (AKI) (ß 0.47), and elevated neutrophil count (ß 0.02) were the risk factors for death. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that although CRRT significantly reduced the inflammation, it did not decrease the fatality rate of patients with CRS. Therefore, the choice of CRRT indication, dialysis time and dialysis mode should be more careful and accurate in COVID-19 patients with CRS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , China , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
19.
Semin Dial ; 34(6): 561-566, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127520

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 illness and the consequent cytokine storm and vasodilatory shock commonly lead to ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). The need for renal replacement therapies (RRTs) in those with the most severe forms of AKI is considerable and risks overwhelming health-care systems at the peak of a surge. We detail the challenges and considerations involved in the preparation of a disaster response plan in situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which dramatically increase demand for nephrology services. Taking careful inventory of all aspects of an RRT program (personnel, consumables, and machines) before a surge in RRT arises and developing disaster contingency protocol anticoagulation and for shared RRT models when absolutely necessary are paramount to a successful response to such a disaster.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 141, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106487

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is a severe respiratory infection leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS] accounting for thousands of cases and deaths across the world. Several alternatives in treatment options have been assessed and used in this patient population. However, when mechanical ventilation and prone positioning are unsuccessful, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation [VV-ECMO] may be used. We present a case of a 62-year-old female, diabetic, admitted to the intensive care unit with fever, flu-like symptoms and a positive COVID-19 test. Ultimately, she worsened on mechanical ventilation and prone positioning and required VV-ECMO. The use of VV-ECMO in COVID-19 infected patients is still controversial. While some studies have shown a high mortality rate despite aggressive treatment, such as in our case, the lack of large sample size studies and treatment alternatives places healthcare providers against a wall without options in patients with severe refractory ARDS due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteremia/complications , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/instrumentation , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Fatal Outcome , Female , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/complications , Humans , Middle Aged , Morocco , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
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