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1.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 241: 113949, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757396

ABSTRACT

Household air pollution from solid fuel combustion was estimated to cause 2.31 million deaths worldwide in 2019; cardiovascular disease is a substantial contributor to the global burden. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between household air pollution (24-h gravimetric kitchen and personal particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC)) and C-reactive protein (CRP) measured in dried blood spots among 107 women in rural Honduras using wood-burning traditional or Justa (an engineered combustion chamber) stoves. A suite of 6 additional markers of systemic injury and inflammation were considered in secondary analyses. We adjusted for potential confounders and assessed effect modification of several cardiovascular-disease risk factors. The median (25th, 75th percentiles) 24-h-average personal PM2.5 concentration was 115 µg/m3 (65,154 µg/m3) for traditional stove users and 52 µg/m3 (39, 81 µg/m3) for Justa stove users; kitchen PM2.5 and BC had similar patterns. Higher concentrations of PM2.5 and BC were associated with higher levels of CRP (e.g., a 25% increase in personal PM2.5 was associated with a 10.5% increase in CRP [95% CI: 1.2-20.6]). In secondary analyses, results were generally consistent with a null association. Evidence for effect modification between pollutant measures and four different cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., high blood pressure) was inconsistent. These results support the growing evidence linking household air pollution and cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution, Indoor , Air Pollution , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , Air Pollution, Indoor/analysis , C-Reactive Protein , Cooking/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Honduras/epidemiology , Humans , Particulate Matter/analysis , Wood/analysis , Wood/chemistry
2.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622630

ABSTRACT

Culinary medicine is an evidence-based approach that blends the art of cooking with the science of medicine to inculcate a healthy dietary pattern. Food prescription programs are gaining popularity in the Unites States, as a means to improve access to healthy foods among patient populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and preliminary impact of A Prescription for Healthy Living (APHL) culinary medicine curriculum on biometric and diet-related behavioral and psychosocial outcomes among patients with diabetes participating in a clinic-led food prescription (food Rx) program. We used a quasi-experimental design to assess APHL program impact on patient biometric outcome data obtained from electronic health records, including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (n = 33 patients in the APHL group, n = 75 patients in the food Rx-only group). Pre-post surveys were administered among those in the APHL group to monitor program impact on psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. Results of the outcome analysis showed significant pre-to-post reduction in HbA1c levels among participants within the APHL group (estimated mean difference = -0.96% (-1.82, -0.10), p = 0.028). Between-group changes showed a greater decrease in HbA1c among those participating in APHL as compared to food Rx-only, albeit these differences were not statistically significant. Participation in APHL demonstrated significant increases in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, fewer participants reported that cooking healthy food is difficult, increased frequency of cooking from scratch, and increased self-efficacy in meal planning and cooking (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the results of our pilot study suggest the potential positive impact of a virtually-implemented culinary medicine approach in improving health outcomes among low-income patients with type 2 diabetes, albeit studies with a larger sample size and a rigorous study design are needed.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diet therapy , Feeding Behavior , Nutritional Sciences , Biometry , COVID-19 , Cooking/methods , Diet Therapy , Diet, Healthy , Health Education , Humans , Pilot Projects , Psychiatric Rehabilitation , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295893

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic enforced social restrictions with abrupt impacts on mental health and changes to health behaviors. From a randomized clinical trial, we assessed the impact of culinary education on home cooking practices, coping strategies and resiliency during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March/April 2020). Participants (n = 28) were aged 25-70 years with a BMI of 27.5-35 kg/m2. The intervention consisted of 12 weekly 30-min one-on-one telemedicine culinary coaching sessions. Coping strategies were assessed through the Brief Coping with Problems Experienced Inventory, and resiliency using the Brief Resilient Coping Scale. Home cooking practices were assessed through qualitative analysis. The average use of self-care as a coping strategy by the intervention group was 6.14 (1.66), compared to the control with 4.64 (1.69); p = 0.03. While more intervention participants had high (n = 5) and medium (n = 8) resiliency compared to controls (n = 4, n = 6, respectively), this difference was not significant (p = 0.33). Intervention participants reported using home cooking skills such as meal planning and time saving techniques during the pandemic. The key findings were that culinary coaching via telemedicine may be an effective intervention for teaching home cooking skills and promoting the use of self-care as a coping strategy during times of stress, including the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Cooking , Education, Distance/methods , Emotional Adjustment , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Cooking/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/therapy , Psychological Tests , Resilience, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Health Informatics J ; 27(1): 1460458220976719, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030278

ABSTRACT

Healthy eating is an important issue affecting a large part of the world population, so human diets are becoming increasingly popular, especially with the devastating consequences of Coronavirus Disease (Covid-19). A realistic and sustainable diet plan can help us to have a healthy eating habit since it considers most of the expectations from a diet without any restriction. In this study, the classical diet problem has been extended in terms of modelling, data sets and solution approach. Inspired by animals' hunting strategies, it was re-modelled as a many-objective optimisation problem. In order to have realistic and applicable diet plans, cooked dishes are used. A well-known many-objective evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the diet problem. Results show that our approach can optimise specialised daily menus for different user types, depending on their preferences, age, gender and body index. Our approach can be easily adapted for users with health issues by adding new constraints and objectives. Our approach can be used individually or by dietitians as a decision support mechanism.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/methods , Energy Intake , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Behavioral Sciences , Body Mass Index , Cooking/economics , Cooking/methods , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Female , Food Preferences , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Vegetarians
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