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1.
J Christ Nurs ; 39(1): 36-41, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561288

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the face of a public health emergency, nurses, particularly those serving faith communities, need to understand and live out their roles in adhering to evidence-based practice while demonstrating grace and obedience to Scripture. Serving as public health role models and advocates, nurses in faith communities can inform and support church leaders in following government directives for the common good. Applicable Scripture, ethical, and research considerations are presented.


Subject(s)
Health Promotion , Pandemics , Cooperative Behavior , Humans
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512304

ABSTRACT

Natural disasters have obvious cross-regional and compound characteristics. Cross-regional emergency cooperation for natural disasters deepens the diversification of coordination relations and the complexity of interaction modes among emergency response organizations, including horizontal and vertical organizational interactions. In order to clarify the cooperation mechanism of emergency organizations during cross-regional emergency cooperation for natural disasters and to explore the key factors that affect the cooperative relationships of emergency organizations, in this study, a game model is constructed based on evolutionary game theory, which is composed of local, neighboring, and central governments. Then, the stability of the emergency game strategy is analyzed. On this basis, a numerical simulation is used to simulate the dynamic evolution trajectory of the game system. The results show that there is an embedded mutual promotion mechanism that evolves towards a positive emergency strategy combination among the game subjects. The selection strategies of the game subjects show the characteristics of consistency and the following: enhanced cooperation efficiency between local and neighboring governments, emergency capital stock, and shared resources, therefore, guiding social emergency forces to actively participate in emergency operations. Strengthening the emergency dispatching strength of the central government and the effectiveness of central-local emergency dispatching, can support the performance of cross-regional emergency cooperation for natural disasters. Furthermore, the efficiency of cooperation between local and neighboring governments will be enhanced.


Subject(s)
Game Theory , Natural Disasters , Biological Evolution , Computer Simulation , Cooperative Behavior , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans
4.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3182-3183, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505577

ABSTRACT

Gregory Quirk has worked in New York, Honduras, and Puerto Rico with a decades-long commitment to mentorship and the global promotion of neuroscience. In an interview with Neuron, he talks about his upcoming move to the University of the Philippines and how virtual meetings are making us rethink collaborations and interactions with members of the community.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Mentoring , Mentors , Neurosciences , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 738184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497180

ABSTRACT

The outbreak and persistence of COVID-19 have posed a great threat to global public health and economic development. The continuous economic deterioration has been intensified due to the continuous prevention and control measures, such as closed management. Insisting on the prevention of the epidemic or economic restart has become a dilemma for all countries. Epidemic prevention is not only the main behavior of a single country but also a common problem faced by all countries in the region. Continuous prevention measures will affect economic development, but an early restart of the economy is faced with the recurrence of the epidemic. To avoid the emergence of prisoner's dilemma in the governance of the epidemic, each country cannot make decisions with its optimization, and so it is necessary to build a regional cooperation mechanism to achieve the overall optimization of the economy and prevent the epidemic. Based on the game theory, we analyzed the behavior of countries when carrying out regional cooperation to govern the epidemic and put forward specific cooperative income distribution schemes according to the different attributes of the countries. Our results showed that in the presence of population mobility, regional cooperation to govern the epidemic can minimize the total number of infected people and maximize the overall utility of the region, which was significantly better than the overall benefits of the region in the case of non-cooperation. However, in detail, the smaller the difference of preference for preventing and controlling the epidemic between the two, the more likely it is to lead to a win-win situation. Otherwise, there will be one with damaged interests. When damaged interests appear, the appropriate distribution of cooperative income to the country with a small economic scale and low preference in preventing the epidemic is more conducive to the achievement of cooperative mechanisms and the realization of a win-win situation in the region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Cooperative Behavior , Game Theory , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 46, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488856

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of June 2021, Zimbabwe entered into a harsh third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which saw an increase in the cumulative number of cases from approximately 38,000 to 120,000 in just two months. This exponential case rise was accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of case fatalities, with a corresponding strain on the public health sector. To effectively inform public health responses, policy and strategy to deal with the current wave and prepare for further waves, we discuss the drivers and challenges of control for this current wave and future waves, and offer practical recommendations. Vaccination will be the most important public health intervention to deal with the spread, morbidity and mortality of COVID-19, therefore, efforts to fight vaccine hesitancy and build vaccine confidence and availability will be critical. Similarly, it will be important to build public health sector capacity and resilience to adequately deal with large-scale outbreaks and absorb the shock waves associated with such. Resuscitating and building the economy is an indispensable component of protecting public health. Therefore, collaborative efforts from relevant public health stakeholders, economists, politicians and other players are required to effectively coordinate the necessary responses and formulate the right policies and strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Public Health , Vaccination , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Capacity Building , Cooperative Behavior , Health Policy , Humans , Vaccination Refusal , Zimbabwe/epidemiology
8.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455442

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this review was to explore the literature for evidence of the impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity, particularly within community care settings for diverse ageing populations. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: An integrative systematic literature review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework combined with the EndNote reference management system. Following the collection and comprehensive screening process completion, a thematic analysis of the included articles occurred utilising within NVivo 12 software. FINDINGS: The review found that there was a paucity of evidence related to the relationship between interprofessional practice models (IPM) and health service equity for ageing populations. There is a need to improve collaborative practices between social care, public health care and health service providers to more clearly define team member roles. Key aspirations included the need for future innovations in health service delivery to place health service equity as a goal for interprofessional practice. There is a need to find ways to measure and articulate the impact for vulnerable populations and communities. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The review offers insight into the need for health care delivery models to place health service equity at the centre of the model design. In practice settings, this includes setting interprofessional team goals around achieving equitable care outcomes for, and with, vulnerable populations. Implications for practice relate to improving how interprofessional teams work with communities to achieve health care equity. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: There is a consensus across the literature that there continues to be health service inequity, yet IPE and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPC) have been growing in momentum for some time. Despite many statements that there is a link between interprofessional practice and improved health service equity and health outcomes, evidence for this is yet to be fully realised. This review highlights the urgent need to review the link between education and practice, and innovative health models of care that enable heath care professionals and social care providers to work together towards achieving health equity for ageing populations. It is clear that more evidence is required to establish evidence for best practice in interprofessional care that has the mitigation of health care inequity as a central objective.


Subject(s)
Cooperative Behavior , Interprofessional Relations , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services
10.
Fam Med Community Health ; 9(4)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430202

ABSTRACT

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic-and based on limited data on the novel coronavirus-it was projected that African countries will be ravaged and the health systems overwhelmed. Fortunately, Africa has so far defied these dire predictions. Many factors account for the less dramatic outcome, in particular the local know-how gained through dealing with previous epidemics, such as Ebola, and the early and coordinated political and public health response, applying a combination of containment and mitigation measures. However, these same measures, exacerbated by existing inequalities, have had negative impacts on vulnerable populations, notably women and children. Furthermore, the observed deterioration of access to and provision of essential health services will likely continue and worsen in countries experiencing future waves of COVID-19 and lacking access to vaccines. The impact of the pandemic on health systems may be one of Africa's main COVID-19 challenges and women and children its greatest victims. In this article, we argue that just as learning from previous epidemics and coordinated preparation informed Africa's response to COVID-19, knowledge, innovations and resources from recent implementation research can be leveraged to mitigate the pandemic's effects and inform recovery efforts. As an example, we present the proven model and multifaceted approach of the Innovating for Maternal and Child Health in Africa Initiative and describe how such a model could be readily applied to building the robust and equitable systems needed to tackle future stresses and shocks, such as epidemics, on health systems while maintaining essential routine services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Health Planning , Pandemics , Africa , Community Networks , Cooperative Behavior , Decision Making , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(1): 1, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393530
14.
Cytometry A ; 97(9): 882-886, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384154

ABSTRACT

Operating shared resource laboratories (SRLs) in times of pandemic is a challenge for research institutions. In a multiuser, high-turnover working space, the transmission of infectious agents is difficult to control. To address this challenge, imaging core facility managers being members of German BioImaging discussed how shared microscopes could be operated with minimal risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2 between users and staff. Here, we describe the resulting guidelines and explain their rationale, with a focus on separating users in space and time, protective face masks, and keeping surfaces virus-free. These recommendations may prove useful for other types of SRLs. © 2020 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. on behalf of International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control , Laboratories/organization & administration , Microscopy , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Decontamination , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Germany , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protective Factors , Research Personnel/organization & administration , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Workflow
17.
Glob Public Health ; 15(7): 1083-1089, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373601

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the critical need to reimagine and repair the broken systems of global health. Specifically, the pandemic demonstrates the hollowness of the global health rhetoric of equity, the weaknesses of a health security-driven global health agenda, and the negative health impacts of power differentials not only globally, but also regionally and locally. This article analyses the effects of these inequities and calls on governments, multilateral agencies, universities, and NGOs to engage in true collaboration and partnership in this historic moment. Before this pandemic spreads further - including in the Global South - with potentially extreme impact, we must work together to rectify the field and practice of global health.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Global Health , Health Care Sector/organization & administration , International Cooperation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , Interinstitutional Relations , Pandemics , Public Health Administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Justice , Social Responsibility
19.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1276-1281, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371750

ABSTRACT

The clinical learning environment (CLE) encompasses the learner's personal characteristics and experiences, social relationships, organizational culture, and the institution's physical and virtual infrastructure. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all 4 of these parts of the CLE have undergone a massive and rapid disruption. Personal and social communications have been limited to virtual interactions or shifted to unfamiliar clinical spaces because of redeployment. Rapid changes to the organizational culture required prompt adaptations from learners and educators in their complex organizational systems yet caused increased confusion and anxiety among them. A traditional reliance on a physical infrastructure for classical educational practices in the CLE was challenged when all institutions had to undergo a major transition to a virtual learning environment. However, disruptions spurred exciting innovations in the CLE. An entire cohort of physicians and learners underwent swift adjustments in their personal and professional development and identity as they rose to meet the clinical and educational challenges they faced due to COVID-19. Social networks and collaborations were expanded beyond traditional institutional walls and previously held international boundaries within multiple specialties. Specific aspects of the organizational and educational culture, including epidemiology, public health, and medical ethics, were brought to the forefront in health professions education, while the physical learning environment underwent a rapid transition to a virtual learning space. As health professions education continues in the era of COVID-19 and into a new era, educators must take advantage of these dynamic systems to identify additional gaps and implement meaningful change. In this article, health professions educators and learners from multiple institutions and specialties discuss the gaps and weaknesses exposed, opportunities revealed, and strategies developed for optimizing the CLE in the post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Learning , Physical Distancing , Students, Medical/psychology , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Interdisciplinary Placement , Organizational Culture , Social Environment , Social Networking , United States
20.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367129

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way hospitals work. Strategies that were detached from the boundaries of departments and responsibilities in the COVID-19 pandemic have proven themselves under extreme conditions and show a beneficial influence on patient flow and resource management as well as on the communication culture. The continuation of closer interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral co-operation in a "new clinical routine" could have a positive impact on personnel concepts, communication strategies, and the management of acute care capacities and patient pathways. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The aim of the paper is to critically discuss the knowledge gained in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic from the various approaches in patient flow and capacity management as well as interdisciplinary co-operation. More recent research has evaluated patient pathway management, personnel planning and communication measures with regard to their effect and practicability for continuation in everyday clinical practice. FINDINGS: Patient flows and acute care capacities can be more efficiently managed by continuing a culture change towards closer interdisciplinary and intersectoral co-operation and technologies that support this with telemedicine functionalities and regional healthcare data interoperability. Together with a bi-directional, more frequent and open communication and feedback culture, it could form a "new clinical routine". ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper discusses a holistic approach on the way away from silo thinking towards cross-departmental collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cooperative Behavior , Hospital Administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Workflow , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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