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1.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 129, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Host inflammation contributes to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 infection causes mild or life-threatening disease. Tools are needed for early risk assessment. METHODS: We studied in 111 COVID-19 patients prospectively followed at a single reference Hospital fifty-three potential biomarkers including alarmins, cytokines, adipocytokines and growth factors, humoral innate immune and neuroendocrine molecules and regulators of iron metabolism. Biomarkers at hospital admission together with age, degree of hypoxia, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatinine were analysed within a data-driven approach to classify patients with respect to survival and ICU outcomes. Classification and regression tree (CART) models were used to identify prognostic biomarkers. RESULTS: Among the fifty-three potential biomarkers, the classification tree analysis selected CXCL10 at hospital admission, in combination with NLR and time from onset, as the best predictor of ICU transfer (AUC [95% CI] = 0.8374 [0.6233-0.8435]), while it was selected alone to predict death (AUC [95% CI] = 0.7334 [0.7547-0.9201]). CXCL10 concentration abated in COVID-19 survivors after healing and discharge from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: CXCL10 results from a data-driven analysis, that accounts for presence of confounding factors, as the most robust predictive biomarker of patient outcome in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Chemokine CXCL10/blood , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Hypertension/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/blood , Coronary Artery Disease/immunology , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Creatine/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/blood , Hypertension/immunology , Hypertension/mortality , Immunity, Humoral , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Intensive Care Units , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
2.
Sovrem Tekhnologii Med ; 13(4): 16-24, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395480

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to assess the gender-related specifics of the COVID-19 course in patients under 55 years of age. Materials and Methods: This pilot single-center continuous retrospective non-randomized study was carried out in the repurposed infectious diseases hospital of the Privolzhsky Research Medical University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). The study inclusion criterion was the age of patients (up to 55 years) and confirmed coronavirus infection. In the groups based on gender differences (25 men, average age 44.0±7.8 years and 32 women, average age 41.9±9.1 years), we monitored complications of COVID-19 such as the transfer of patients to the ICU and the volume of lung damage (determined with CT scans). Results: The course of COVID-19 in male patients younger than 55 was aggravated by concomitant diseases (γ=0.36; p=0.043), among which IHD (γ=1.00; p=0.003) and liver disease (γ=0.58; p=0.007) dominated. Frequency analysis confirmed the high prevalence of coronary artery disease in men (p=0.044). Significant differences between the gender-related groups were noted in the volume of lung lesions: at admission (p=0.050), during hospital treatment (p=0.019), and at discharge (p=0.044). Using the logistic regression method, a relationship was found between the transfer of male patients to ICU and the Krebs index [y= -2.033 + 1.154 male gender + 1.539 Krebs index (χ2=5.68; p=0.059)] and comorbidity [y= -2.836 + 1.081 male gender + 2.052 comorbidity (χ2=7.03; p=0.030)]. The influence of the Krebs index and the male gender on the excess volume of lung lesions was shown [y= -1.962 + 0.575 male gender + 1.915 Krebs index (χ2=7.78; p=0.021)]. Conclusion: In individuals under the age of 55 diagnosed with COVID-19, gender is of significant importance: in men, there is a more pronounced lesion of the lung parenchyma and a more significant change in laboratory parameters. Risk factors for a severe course of COVID-19 in men are coronary artery disease and hepatobiliary disorder. Calculating the Krebs index can be used to assess the risk of disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Russia/epidemiology
3.
Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes ; 7(5): 438-446, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377964

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To evaluate the acute and chronic patterns of myocardial injury among patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), and their mid-term outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who had a hospital encounter within the Mount Sinai Health System (New York City) between 27 February 2020 and 15 October 2020 were evaluated for inclusion. Troponin levels assessed between 72 h before and 48 h after the COVID-19 diagnosis were used to stratify the study population by the presence of acute and chronic myocardial injury, as defined by the Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction. Among 4695 patients, those with chronic myocardial injury (n = 319, 6.8%) had more comorbidities, including chronic kidney disease and heart failure, while acute myocardial injury (n = 1168, 24.9%) was more associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Both types of myocardial injury were strongly associated with impaired survival at 6 months [chronic: hazard ratio (HR) 4.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.44-5.06; acute: HR 4.72, 95% CI 4.14-5.36], even after excluding events occurring in the first 30 days (chronic: HR 3.97, 95% CI 2.15-7.33; acute: HR 4.13, 95% CI 2.75-6.21). The mortality risk was not significantly different in patients with acute as compared with chronic myocardial injury (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.94-1.36), except for a worse prognostic impact of acute myocardial injury in patients <65 years of age (P-interaction = 0.043) and in those without coronary artery disease (P-interaction = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Chronic and acute myocardial injury represent two distinctive patterns of cardiac involvement among COVID-19 patients. While both types of myocardial injury are associated with impaired survival at 6 months, mortality rates peak in the early phase of the infection but remain elevated even beyond 30 days during the convalescent phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Myocardial Infarction/blood , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Troponin/analysis , Acute Disease/epidemiology , Acute Disease/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/mortality , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , New York City/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5390-5395, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363677

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability and thrombosis caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are related to the higher mortality rate. Because of limited data on the antiplatelet effect, we aimed to evaluate the impact of aspirin add-on therapy on the outcome of the patients hospitalized due to severe COVID-19. In this cohort study, patients with a confirmed diagnosis of severe COVID-19 admitted to Imam Hossein Medical Center, Tehran, Iran from March 2019 to July 2020 were included. Demographics and related clinical data during their hospitalization were recorded. The mortality rate of the patients was considered as the primary outcome and its association with aspirin use was assessed. Nine hundred and ninety-one patients were included, of that 336 patients (34%) received aspirin during their hospitalization and 655 ones (66%) did not. Comorbidities were more prevalent in the patients who were receiving aspirin. Results from the multivariate COX proportional model demonstrated a significant independent association between aspirin use and reduction in the risk of in-hospital mortality (0.746 [0.560-0.994], p = 0.046). Aspirin use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with a significant decrease in mortality rate. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of aspirin administration in this population.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/drug therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Iran , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lung/blood supply , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
5.
Coron Artery Dis ; 32(5): 367-371, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291432

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have reported evidence that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately affected patients with underlying comorbidities. Our study aims to evaluate the impact of both cardiac and noncardiac comorbidities on a high-risk population with COVID-19 infection and coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to those without CAD. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients who tested COVID-19 positive via reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) assay. We compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without CAD. Population demographics, comorbidities and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with inpatient mortality. RESULTS: A final sample population of 355 patients was identified, 77 of which had a known diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Our study population had a higher proportion of females, and those with CAD were significantly older. The rates of cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, as well as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were significantly higher in the CAD population. Lactate dehydrogenase was the only inflammatory marker significantly lower in the CAD group, while troponin and brain natriuretic peptide were significantly higher in this population. Patients with CAD also had significantly higher inpatient mortality (31% vs 20%, P = 0.046) and need for renal replacement therapy (33% vs 11%, P < 0.0001) compared to the non-CAD group. However, only age [odds ratio 1.041 (1.017-1.066), P = 0.001] was significantly associated with mortality in the overall population after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities, while the presence of CAD was not independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: Patients with CAD and COVID-19 have higher rates of comorbidities, inpatient mortality and need for renal replacement therapy compared to their non-CAD counterparts. However, CAD in itself was not associated with mortality after adjusting for other covariates, suggesting that other factors may play a larger role in the increased mortality and poor outcomes in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Philadelphia , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
7.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5390-5395, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206845

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability and thrombosis caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are related to the higher mortality rate. Because of limited data on the antiplatelet effect, we aimed to evaluate the impact of aspirin add-on therapy on the outcome of the patients hospitalized due to severe COVID-19. In this cohort study, patients with a confirmed diagnosis of severe COVID-19 admitted to Imam Hossein Medical Center, Tehran, Iran from March 2019 to July 2020 were included. Demographics and related clinical data during their hospitalization were recorded. The mortality rate of the patients was considered as the primary outcome and its association with aspirin use was assessed. Nine hundred and ninety-one patients were included, of that 336 patients (34%) received aspirin during their hospitalization and 655 ones (66%) did not. Comorbidities were more prevalent in the patients who were receiving aspirin. Results from the multivariate COX proportional model demonstrated a significant independent association between aspirin use and reduction in the risk of in-hospital mortality (0.746 [0.560-0.994], p = 0.046). Aspirin use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with a significant decrease in mortality rate. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of aspirin administration in this population.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/drug therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Iran , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lung/blood supply , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(3): 738-745, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1107857

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can cause a wide range of cardiovascular diseases, including ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and STEMI-mimickers (such as myocarditis, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, among others). We performed a systematic review to summarize the clinical features, management, and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 who had ST-segment elevation. We searched electronic databases from inception to September 30, 2020 for studies that reported clinical data about COVID-19 patients with ST-segment elevation. Differences between patients with and without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) on coronary angiography were evaluated. Forty-two studies (35 case reports and seven case series) involving 161 patients were included. The mean age was 62.7 ± 13.6 years and 75% were men. The most frequent symptom was chest pain (78%). Eighty-three percent of patients had obstructive CAD. Patients with non-obstructive CAD had more diffuse ST-segment elevation (13% versus 1%, p = 0.03) and diffuse left ventricular wall-motion abnormality (23% versus 3%, p = 0.02) compared to obstructive CAD. In patients with previous coronary stent (n = 17), the 76% presented with stent thrombosis. In the majority of cases, the main reperfusion strategy was primary percutaneous coronary intervention instead of fibrinolysis. The in-hospital mortality was 30% without difference between patients with (30%) or without (31%) obstructive CAD. Our data suggest that a relatively high proportion of COVID-19 patients with ST-segment elevation had non-obstructive CAD. The prognosis was poor across groups. However, our findings are based on case reports and case series that should be confirmed in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/instrumentation , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Stents , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Cell Mol Med ; 25(2): 1263-1273, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060602

ABSTRACT

To determine whether pre-hospitalization use of aspirin is associated with all-cause mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We recruited 183 adult patients with CAD diagnosed with COVID-19, including 52 taking low-dose aspirin (mean [SD] age, 69.7 [1.1] years; 59.6% men) and 131 without using aspirin (mean [SD] age, 71.8 [0.9] years; 51.9% men), who were admitted in the Tongji hospital in Wuhan, China from January 10, 2020 to March 30, 2020. There was no difference on in-hospital mortality between aspirin group and non-aspirin group (21.2% vs. 22.1%, P = .885). Similarly, for critically severe COVID-19 patients, the mortality in aspirin group was close to that in non-aspirin group (44% vs. 45.9%, P = .872). Moreover, the percentage of patients with CAD taking low-dose aspirin did not differ between those survivors and non-survivors (28.7% vs. 27.5%, P = .885). Meanwhile, the usage of aspirin was not correlated with all-cause mortality in multivariate analysis (OR = 0.944, 95% CI: 0.411-2.172, P = .893). Collectively, our study suggested that the pre-hospitalization use of low-dose aspirin was not associated with the clinical outcome of patients with CAD hospitalized with COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/drug therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Aged , China , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies
11.
Open Heart ; 7(2)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939908

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Among patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), coronary artery disease (CAD) has been identified as a high-risk condition. We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes and mortality among patients with COVID-19 according to CAD status. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed data from patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Cremona Hospital (Lombardy region, Italy) between February and March 2020. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. CAD was defined as a history of prior myocardial infarction (MI), prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or CAD that was being medically treated. RESULTS: Of 1252 consecutive patients with COVID-19, 124 (9.9%) had concomitant CAD. Patients with CAD were older and had a higher prevalence of comorbidities compared with those without CAD. Although patients with CAD had a higher risk of all-cause mortality than patients without CAD (HR 3.01, 95% CI 2.27 to 3.99), this difference was no longer significant in the adjusted model (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.63). Results were consistent among patients with prior MI (adjusted HR (aHR) 0.87, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.41), prior PCI (aHR 1.10, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.62), prior CABG (aHR 0.91, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.82), or CAD medically treated (aHR 0.84, 95% CI 0.29 to 2.44). Multivariable analysis showed that age (aHR per 5 year increase 1.62, 95% CI 1.53 to 1.72) and female sex (aHR 0.63, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.82) were the only two independent correlates of mortality. CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 and CAD have an exceedingly higher risk of mortality, which is mainly attributable to the burden of comorbidities rather than to a direct effect of CAD per se.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Hospitalization , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
15.
Coron Artery Dis ; 32(5): 359-366, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 is a disease with high mortality, and risk factors for worse clinical outcome have not been well-defined yet. The aim of this study is to delineate the prognostic importance of presence of concomitant cardiac injury on admission in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: For this multi-center retrospective study, data of consecutive patients who were treated for COVID-19 between 20 March and 20 April 2020 were collected. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings and outcomes data were obtained from electronic medical records. In-hospital clinical outcome was compared between patients with and without cardiac injury. RESULTS: A total of 607 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were included in the study; the median age was 62.5 ± 14.3 years, and 334 (55%) were male. Cardiac injury was detected in 150 (24.7%) of patients included in the study. Mortality rate was higher in patients with cardiac injury (42% vs. 8%; P < 0.01). The frequency of patients who required ICU (72% vs. 19%), who developed acute kidney injury (14% vs. 1%) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (71%vs. 18%) were also higher in patients with cardiac injury. In multivariate analysis, age, coronary artery disease (CAD), elevated CRP levels, and presence of cardiac injury [odds ratio (OR) 10.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.42-46.27; P < 0.001) were found to be independent predictors of mortality. In subgroup analysis, including patients free of history of CAD, presence of cardiac injury on admission also predicted mortality (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.17-5.45; P = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Cardiac injury on admission is associated with worse clinical outcome and higher mortality risk in COVID-19 patients including patients free of previous CAD diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Troponin I/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/blood , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Disease Progression , Female , Heart Diseases/blood , Heart Diseases/mortality , Heart Diseases/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Turkey , Up-Regulation
16.
Am Heart J ; 226: 24-25, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276507

ABSTRACT

Using Mt. Sinai (New York City) EMR health system data, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 8438 COVID-19 patients seen between March 1 and April 22, 2020. Risk of intubation and of death rose as a function of increasing age and as a function of greater cardiovascular comorbidity. Combining age and specific comorbidity markers showed patterns suggesting that cardiovascular comorbidities increased relative risks for adverse outcomes most substantially in the younger subjects with progressively diminishing relative effects at older ages.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies/complications , Cardiomyopathies/epidemiology , Cardiomyopathies/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Troponin I/blood
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