Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 40-49, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585824

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection is generally mild or asymptomatic in children but a biological basis for this outcome is unclear. Here we compare antibody and cellular immunity in children (aged 3-11 years) and adults. Antibody responses against spike protein were high in children and seroconversion boosted responses against seasonal Beta-coronaviruses through cross-recognition of the S2 domain. Neutralization of viral variants was comparable between children and adults. Spike-specific T cell responses were more than twice as high in children and were also detected in many seronegative children, indicating pre-existing cross-reactive responses to seasonal coronaviruses. Importantly, children retained antibody and cellular responses 6 months after infection, whereas relative waning occurred in adults. Spike-specific responses were also broadly stable beyond 12 months. Therefore, children generate robust, cross-reactive and sustained immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 with focused specificity for the spike protein. These findings provide insight into the relative clinical protection that occurs in most children and might help to guide the design of pediatric vaccination regimens.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Protection/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross Reactions/immunology , Humans
2.
Virol J ; 18(1): 166, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533268

ABSTRACT

The emergence of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and more recently, the independent evolution of multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants has generated renewed interest in virus evolution and cross-species transmission. While all known human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are speculated to have originated in animals, very little is known about their evolutionary history and factors that enable some CoVs to co-exist with humans as low pathogenic and endemic infections (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1), while others, such as SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 have evolved to cause severe disease. In this review, we highlight the origins of all known HCoVs and map positively selected for mutations within HCoV proteins to discuss the evolutionary trajectory of SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, we discuss emerging mutations within SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern (VOC), along with highlighting the demonstrated or speculated impact of these mutations on virus transmission, pathogenicity, and neutralization by natural or vaccine-mediated immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/transmission , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
J Infect Dis ; 224(8): 1305-1315, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A notable feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is that children are less susceptible to severe disease. Children are known to experience more infections with endemic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) compared to adults. Little is known whether HCoV infections lead to cross-reactive anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies. METHODS: We investigated the presence of cross-reactive anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies to spike 1 (S1), S1-receptor-binding domain (S1-RBD), and nucleocapsid protein (NP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and neutralizing activity by a SARS-CoV-2 pseudotyped virus neutralization assay, in prepandemic sera collected from children (n = 50) and adults (n = 45), and compared with serum samples from convalescent COVID-19 patients (n = 16). RESULTS: A significant proportion of children (up to 40%) had detectable cross-reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 S1, S1-RBD, and NP antigens, and the anti-S1 and anti-S1-RBD antibody levels correlated with anti-HCoV-HKU1 and anti-HCoV-OC43 S1 antibody titers in prepandemic samples (P < .001). There were marked increases of anti-HCoV-HKU1 and - OC43 S1 (but not anti-NL63 and -229E S1-RBD) antibody titers in serum samples from convalescent COVID-19 patients (P < .001), indicating an activation of cross-reactive immunological memory to ß-coronavirus spike. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated cross-reactive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in prepandemic serum samples from children and young adults. Promoting this cross-reactive immunity and memory response derived from common HCoV may be an effective strategy against SARS-COV-2 and future novel coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Convalescence , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
4.
Clin Immunol ; 215: 108426, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385285
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 696370, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357528

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is caused by SARS-CoV-2, a novel zoonotic coronavirus. Emerging evidence indicates that preexisting humoral immunity against other seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoVs) plays a critical role in the specific antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. However, current work to assess the effects of preexisting and cross-reactive anti-HCoVs antibodies has been limited. To address this issue, we have adapted our previously reported multiplex assay to simultaneously and quantitatively measure anti-HCoV antibodies. The full mPlex-CoV panel covers the spike (S) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins of three highly pathogenic HCoVs (SARS-CoV-1, SARS-CoV-2, MERS) and four human seasonal strains (OC43, HKU1, NL63, 229E). Combining this assay with volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS), we measured the anti-HCoV IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies in fingerstick blood samples. The results demonstrate that the mPlex-CoV assay has high specificity and sensitivity. It can detect strain-specific anti-HCoV antibodies down to 0.1 ng/ml with 4 log assay range and with low intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (%CV). We also estimate multiple strain HCoVs IgG, IgA and IgM concentration in VAMS samples in three categories of subjects: pre-COVID-19 (n=21), post-COVID-19 convalescents (n=19), and COVID-19 vaccine recipients (n=14). Using metric multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis, HCoVs IgG concentrations in fingerstick blood samples were well separated between the pre-COVID-19, post-COVID-19 convalescents, and COVID-19 vaccine recipients. In addition, we demonstrate how multi-dimensional scaling analysis can be used to visualize IgG mediated antibody immunity against multiple human coronaviruses. We conclude that the combination of VAMS and the mPlex-Cov assay is well suited to performing remote study sample collection under pandemic conditions to monitor HCoVs antibody responses in population studies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Immunoassay/methods , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
6.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348697

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is the seventh identified human coronavirus. Understanding the extent of pre-existing immunity induced by seropositivity to endemic seasonal coronaviruses and the impact of cross-reactivity on COVID-19 disease progression remains a key research question in immunity to SARS-CoV-2 and the immunopathology of COVID-2019 disease. This paper describes a panel of lentiviral pseudotypes bearing the spike (S) proteins for each of the seven human coronaviruses (HCoVs), generated under similar conditions optimized for high titre production allowing a high-throughput investigation of antibody neutralization breadth. Optimal production conditions and most readily available permissive target cell lines were determined for spike-mediated entry by each HCoV pseudotype: SARS-CoV-1, SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-NL63 best transduced HEK293T/17 cells transfected with ACE2 and TMPRSS2, HCoV-229E and MERS-CoV preferentially entered HUH7 cells, and CHO cells were most permissive for the seasonal betacoronavirus HCoV-HKU1. Entry of ACE2 using pseudotypes was enhanced by ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in target cells, whilst TMPRSS2 transfection rendered HEK293T/17 cells permissive for HCoV-HKU1 and HCoV-OC43 entry. Additionally, pseudotype viruses were produced bearing additional coronavirus surface proteins, including the SARS-CoV-2 Envelope (E) and Membrane (M) proteins and HCoV-OC43/HCoV-HKU1 Haemagglutinin-Esterase (HE) proteins. This panel of lentiviral pseudotypes provides a safe, rapidly quantifiable and high-throughput tool for serological comparison of pan-coronavirus neutralizing responses; this can be used to elucidate antibody dynamics against individual coronaviruses and the effects of antibody cross-reactivity on clinical outcome following natural infection or vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/blood , Cell Line , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Cross Reactions , Humans , Lentivirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Neutralization Tests , Plasmids , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transfection , Virus Internalization
7.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4740, 2021 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345557

ABSTRACT

Unraveling the long-term kinetics of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 and the individual characteristics influencing it, including the impact of pre-existing antibodies to human coronaviruses causing common cold (HCoVs), is essential to understand protective immunity to COVID-19 and devise effective surveillance strategies. IgM, IgA and IgG levels against six SARS-CoV-2 antigens and the nucleocapsid antigen of the four HCoV (229E, NL63, OC43 and HKU1) were quantified by Luminex, and antibody neutralization capacity was assessed by flow cytometry, in a cohort of health care workers followed up to 7 months (N = 578). Seroprevalence increases over time from 13.5% (month 0) and 15.6% (month 1) to 16.4% (month 6). Levels of antibodies, including those with neutralizing capacity, are stable over time, except IgG to nucleocapsid antigen and IgM levels that wane. After the peak response, anti-spike antibody levels increase from ~150 days post-symptom onset in all individuals (73% for IgG), in the absence of any evidence of re-exposure. IgG and IgA to HCoV are significantly higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic seropositive individuals. Thus, pre-existing cross-reactive HCoVs antibodies could have a protective effect against SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Common Cold/immunology , Common Cold/virology , Cross Protection/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood
8.
Clin Immunol ; 229: 108782, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265656

ABSTRACT

Endemic human coronaviruses (hCoVs) are common causative agents of respiratory tract infections, affecting especially children. However, in the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, children are the least affected age-group. The objective of this study was to investigate the magnitude of endemic hCoVs antibodies in Finnish children and adults, and pre-pandemic antibody cross-reactivity with SARS-CoV-2. Antibody levels against endemic hCoVs start to rise at a very early age, reaching to overall 100% seroprevalence. No difference in the antibody levels was detected for OC43 but the magnitude of 229E-specific antibodies was significantly higher in the sera of children. OC43 and 229E hCoV antibody levels of children correlated significantly with each other and with the level of cross-reactive SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, whereas these correlations completely lacked in adults. Although none of the sera showed SARS-CoV-2 neutralization, the higher overall hCoV cross-reactivity observed in children might, at least partially, contribute in controlling SARS-CoV-2 infection in this population.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibody Specificity , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross Reactions , Endemic Diseases , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Seroepidemiologic Studies
9.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259626

ABSTRACT

Epithelial characteristics underlying the differential susceptibility of chronic asthma to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) and other viral infections are currently unclear. By revisiting transcriptomic data from patients with Th2 low versus Th2 high asthma, as well as mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics, we characterized the changes in expression of human coronavirus and influenza viral entry genes relative to sex, airway location, and disease endotype. We found sexual dimorphism in the expression of SARS-CoV-2-related genes ACE2, TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and SLC6A19. ACE2 receptor downregulation occurred specifically in females in Th2 high asthma, while proteases broadly assisting coronavirus and influenza viral entry, TMPRSS2, and TMPRSS4, were highly upregulated in both sexes. Overall, changes in SARS-CoV-2-related gene expression were specific to the Th2 high molecular endotype of asthma and different by asthma severity and airway location. The downregulation of ACE2 (COVID-19, SARS) and ANPEP (HCoV-229E) viral receptors wascorrelated with loss of club and ciliated cells in Th2 high asthma. Meanwhile, the increase in DPP4 (MERS-CoV), ST3GAL4, and ST6GAL1 (influenza) was associated with increased goblet and basal activated cells. Overall, this study elucidates sex, airway location, disease endotype, and changes in epithelial heterogeneity as potential factors underlying asthmatic susceptibility, or lack thereof, to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions , Influenza, Human/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Asthma/genetics , Asthma/virology , COVID-19/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Epithelial Cells/classification , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Male , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sex Characteristics
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 629102, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236669

ABSTRACT

The adaptive immune response to severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is important for vaccine development and in the recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Men and cancer patients have been reported to be at higher risks of contracting the virus and developing the more severe forms of COVID-19. Prostate cancer (PCa) may be associated with both of these risks. We show that CD4+ T cells of SARS-CoV-2-unexposed patients with hormone-refractory (HR) metastatic PCa had decreased CD4+ T cell immune responses to antigens from SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein but not from the spiked glycoprotein of the 'common cold'-associated human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) as compared with healthy male volunteers who responded comparably to both HCoV-229E- and SARS-CoV-2-derived antigens. Moreover, the HCoV-229E spike glycoprotein antigen-elicited CD4+ T cell immune responses cross-reacted with the SARS-CoV-2 spiked glycoprotein antigens. PCa patients may have impaired responses to the vaccination, and the cross-reactivity can mediate antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of COVID-19. These findings highlight the potential for increased vulnerability of PCa patients to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Prostatic Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Aged , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
11.
Viruses ; 13(5)2021 05 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234827

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 represents an unprecedented public health challenge. While the majority of SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 resolve their infection with few complications, some individuals experience prolonged symptoms lasting for weeks after initial diagnosis. Persistent viral infections are commonly accompanied by immunologic dysregulation, but it is unclear if persistent COVID-19 impacts the development of virus-specific cellular immunity. To this end, we analyzed SARS-CoV-2-specific cellular immunity in convalescent COVID-19 patients who experienced eight days or fewer of COVID-19 symptoms or symptoms persisting for 18 days or more. We observed that persistent COVID-19 symptoms were not associated with the development of an overtly dysregulated cellular immune response. Furthermore, we observed that reactivity against the N protein from SARS-CoV-2 correlates with the amount of reactivity against the seasonal human coronaviruses 229E and NL63. These results provide insight into the processes that regulate the development of cellular immunity against SARS-CoV-2 and related human coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
12.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(4): e1009453, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172889

ABSTRACT

There is intense interest in antibody immunity to coronaviruses. However, it is unknown if coronaviruses evolve to escape such immunity, and if so, how rapidly. Here we address this question by characterizing the historical evolution of human coronavirus 229E. We identify human sera from the 1980s and 1990s that have neutralizing titers against contemporaneous 229E that are comparable to the anti-SARS-CoV-2 titers induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination. We test these sera against 229E strains isolated after sera collection, and find that neutralizing titers are lower against these "future" viruses. In some cases, sera that neutralize contemporaneous 229E viral strains with titers >1:100 do not detectably neutralize strains isolated 8-17 years later. The decreased neutralization of "future" viruses is due to antigenic evolution of the viral spike, especially in the receptor-binding domain. If these results extrapolate to other coronaviruses, then it may be advisable to periodically update SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Immune Evasion , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
13.
J Clin Invest ; 131(10)2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171752

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown T cell cross-recognition of SARS-CoV-2 and common cold coronavirus spike proteins. However, the effect of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on T cell responses to common cold coronaviruses (CCCs) remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed CD4+ T cell responses to spike peptides from SARS-CoV-2 and 3 CCCs (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, and HCoV-OC43) before and after study participants received Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) or Moderna (mRNA-1273) mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccine recipients showed broad T cell responses to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, and we identified 23 distinct targeted peptides in 9 participants, including 1 peptide that was targeted in 6 individuals. Only 4 of these 23 targeted peptides would potentially be affected by mutations in the UK (B.1.1.7) and South African (B.1.351) variants, and CD4+ T cells from vaccine recipients recognized the 2 variant spike proteins as effectively as they recognized the spike protein from the ancestral virus. Interestingly, we observed a 3-fold increase in the CD4+ T cell responses to HCoV-NL63 spike peptides after vaccination. Our results suggest that T cell responses elicited or enhanced by SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines may be able to control SARS-CoV-2 variants and lead to cross-protection against some endemic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus NL63, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Adult , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
14.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(7): 1839-1849, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151897

ABSTRACT

Humoral immunity to the Severe Adult Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus (CoV)-2 is not fully understood yet but is a crucial factor of immune protection. The possibility of antibody cross-reactivity between SARS-CoV-2 and other human coronaviruses (HCoVs) would have important implications for immune protection but also for the development of specific diagnostic ELISA tests. Using peptide microarrays, n = 24 patient samples and n = 12 control samples were screened for antibodies against the entire SARS-CoV-2 proteome as well as the Spike (S), Nucleocapsid (N), VME1 (V), R1ab, and Protein 3a (AP3A) of the HCoV strains SARS, MERS, OC43, and 229E. While widespread cross-reactivity was revealed across several immunodominant regions of S and N, IgG binding to several SARS-CoV-2-derived peptides provided statistically significant discrimination between COVID-19 patients and controls. Selected target peptides may serve as capture antigens for future, highly COVID-19-specific diagnostic antibody tests.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Protein Array Analysis/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Adult , Aged , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Proteome/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
15.
J Perinatol ; 41(5): 952-960, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111968

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The influence of previous viral symptoms on the level and duration of human milk antibodies reactive to SARS-CoV-2, and common human coronaviruses (HCoVs) was investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Antibodies reactive to S1 and S2 subunits from SARS-CoV-2, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-229E were measured via ELISA in human milk samples collected from March to June 2020 in mothers with and without viral symptoms. RESULTS: The presence of viral symptoms influenced the levels of SARS-CoV-2 S2-reactive SIgA/IgA and tended to influence SARS-CoV-2 S1 SIgA/IgA and S2-reactive SIgM/IgM in human milk but did not relate to IgG. HCoV-229E S1 + S2-reactive SIgA/IgA and SIgM/IgM, as well as HCoV-OC43 S1 + S2-reactive IgG were related to the symptoms. The duration of antibody levels in human milk in mothers with viral symptoms varied between 3 and 4 months post maternal report of viral symptoms. CONCLUSION: Previous viral symptoms and individual mothers may change the antibody cross-reactive levels to SARS-CoV-2 and HCoVs in human milk.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/immunology , Milk, Human/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/blood , Immunoglobulin Isotypes/immunology , Young Adult
16.
J Clin Invest ; 130(12): 6631-6638, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDT cell responses to the common cold coronaviruses have not been well characterized. Preexisting T cell immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been reported, and a recent study suggested that this immunity was due to cross-recognition of the novel coronavirus by T cells specific for the common cold coronaviruses.METHODSWe used the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay to characterize the T cell responses against peptide pools derived from the spike protein of 3 common cold coronaviruses (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, and HCoV-OC43) and SARS-CoV-2 in 21 healthy donors (HDs) who were seronegative for SARS-CoV-2 and had no known exposure to the virus. An in vitro expansion culture assay was also used to analyze memory T cell responses.RESULTSWe found responses to the spike protein of the 3 common cold coronaviruses in many of the donors. We then focused on HCoV-NL63 and detected broad T cell responses to the spike protein and identified 22 targeted peptides. Interestingly, only 1 study participant had a significant response to SARS-CoV-2 spike or nucleocapsid protein in the ELISPOT assay. In vitro expansion studies suggested that T cells specific for the HCoV-NL63 spike protein in this individual could also recognize SARS-CoV-2 spike protein peptide pools.CONCLUSIONHDs have circulating T cells specific for the spike proteins of HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, and HCoV-OC43. T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 spike and nucleocapsid proteins were present in only 1 participant and were potentially the result of cross-recognition by T cells specific for the common cold coronaviruses. Further studies are needed to determine whether this cross-recognition influences coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Common Cold/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
17.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 319(6): L926-L931, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951850

ABSTRACT

The recurrent emergence of novel, pathogenic coronaviruses (CoVs) severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 (SARS-CoV-1; 2002), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV (2012), and most recently SARS-CoV-2 (2019) has highlighted the need for physiologically informative airway epithelial cell infection models for studying immunity to CoVs and development of antiviral therapies. To address this, we developed an in vitro infection model for two human coronaviruses; alphacoronavirus 229E-CoV (229E) and betacoronavirus OC43-CoV (OC43) in differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs). Primary BECs from healthy subjects were grown at air-liquid interface (ALI) and infected with 229E or OC43, and replication kinetics and time-course expression of innate immune mediators were assessed. OC43 and 229E-CoVs replicated in differentiated pBECs but displayed distinct replication kinetics: 229E replicated rapidly with viral load peaking at 24 h postinfection, while OC43 replication was slower peaking at 96 h after infection. This was associated with diverse antiviral response profiles defined by increased expression of type I/III interferons and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) by 229E compared with no innate immune activation with OC43 infection. Understanding the host-virus interaction for previously established coronaviruses will give insight into pathogenic mechanisms underpinning SARS-CoV-2-induced respiratory disease and other future coronaviruses that may arise from zoonotic sources.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bronchi/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Bronchi/drug effects , Bronchi/virology , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Interferons/metabolism
18.
Transfusion ; 61(2): 356-360, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are several types of coronaviruses that infect humans and cause disease. The latest is severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is an emerging global threat with no current effective treatment. Normal intravenous immunoglobulin (N-IVIG) has been administered to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients to control severe inflammation and the cellular immune response. However, the neutralizing activity of N-IVIG against SARS-CoV-2 has not yet been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine whether N-IVIG manufactured before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic contained IgG antibodies against the circulating human coronaviruses (HCoVs) that cross-react with the highly pathogenic coronaviruses SARS-CoV-1, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and SARS-CoV-2. No cases of SARS-CoV-1 or MERS-CoV have been reported in Japan. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The neutralizing and binding activities of N-IVIG against SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, HCoV 229E, and HCoV OC43 were evaluated. Nine N-IVIG lots manufactured between 2000 and 2018, derived from donors in Japan, were tested. Binding activity was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence assay. RESULTS: None of the N-IVIG lots tested displayed neutralizing or binding activity against SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, or SARS-CoV-2. However, they displayed substantial neutralizing and binding activity against HCoV OC43 and weak neutralizing and substantial binding activity against HCoV 229E. CONCLUSION: N-IVIG derived from healthy donors in Japan before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic had no direct effect against SARS-CoV-2. Further studies are warranted to determine the effects of N-IVIG manufactured after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/physiology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Japan , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
19.
Nature ; 587(7833): 270-274, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684778

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused the rapidly unfolding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic1,2. Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 vary, ranging from asymptomatic infection to respiratory failure. The mechanisms that determine such variable outcomes remain unresolved. Here we investigated CD4+ T cells that are reactive against the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 in the peripheral blood of patients with COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2-unexposed healthy donors. We detected spike-reactive CD4+ T cells not only in 83% of patients with COVID-19 but also in 35% of healthy donors. Spike-reactive CD4+ T cells in healthy donors were primarily active against C-terminal epitopes in the spike protein, which show a higher homology to spike glycoproteins of human endemic coronaviruses, compared with N-terminal epitopes. Spike-protein-reactive T cell lines generated from SARS-CoV-2-naive healthy donors responded similarly to the C-terminal region of the spike proteins of the human endemic coronaviruses 229E and OC43, as well as that of SARS-CoV-2. This results indicate that spike-protein cross-reactive T cells are present, which were probably generated during previous encounters with endemic coronaviruses. The effect of pre-existing SARS-CoV-2 cross-reactive T cells on clinical outcomes remains to be determined in larger cohorts. However, the presence of spike-protein cross-reactive T cells in a considerable fraction of the general population may affect the dynamics of the current pandemic, and has important implications for the design and analysis of upcoming trials investigating COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...