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2.
Pediatr Dermatol ; 37(3): 435-436, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097853

ABSTRACT

It has been reported that the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) may be associated with a papulovesicular skin eruption predominantly involving the trunk. We hereby present a case of COVID-19-associated varicella-like exanthem in an 8-year-old girl with mild systemic symptoms.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Exanthema/diagnosis , Exanthema/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , COVID-19 , Child , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Korean J Radiol ; 21(5): 541-544, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089767

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia is a recent outbreak in mainland China and has rapidly spread to multiple countries worldwide. Pulmonary parenchymal opacities are often observed during chest radiography. Currently, few cases have reported the complications of severe COVID-19 pneumonia. We report a case where serial follow-up chest computed tomography revealed progression of pulmonary lesions into confluent bilateral consolidation with lower lung predominance, thereby confirming COVID-19 pneumonia. Furthermore, complications such as mediastinal emphysema, giant bulla, and pneumothorax were also observed during the course of the disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mediastinal Emphysema/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumothorax/etiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Blister , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
BMJ ; 369: m1672, 2020 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078903

ABSTRACT

Guideline: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection in pregnancyPublished by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), with input from the Royal College of Midwives, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPH), the Royal College of Anaesthetists, and the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association.This summary is based on version 8 of the guideline, published on 17 April 2020 (https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/2020-04-17-coronavirus-covid-19-infection-in-pregnancy.pdf).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Prenatal Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
JBRA Assist Reprod ; 24(2): 219-225, 2020 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067109

ABSTRACT

The current outbreak of the novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) started in China in December 2019 and has since spread to several other countries. On March 25, 2020, a total of 375,498 cases had been confirmed globally with 2,201 cases in Brazil, showing the urgency of reacting to this international public health emergency. While in most cases, mild symptoms are observed, in some cases the infection leads to serious pulmonary disease. As a result, the possible consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak for pregnant women and its potential effects on the management of assisted reproductive treatments, demand attention. In this review, we summarize the latest research progress related to COVID-19 epidemiology and the reported data of pregnant women, and discuss the current evidence of COVID-19 infections during pregnancy and its potential consequences for assisted reproductive treatments. Reported data suggest that symptoms in pregnant women are similar to those in other people, and that there is no evidence for higher maternal or fetal risks. However, considering the initial data and lack of comprehensive knowledge on the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy, human reproduction societies have recommended postponing the embryo transfers and do not initiate new treatment cycles. New evidence must be considered carefully in order to adjust these recommendations accordingly at any time and to guide assisted reproductive treatments.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Reproduction , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Virol ; 96(17): e0006522, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001768

ABSTRACT

Swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV) is a recently emerging bat-borne coronavirus responsible for high mortality rates in piglets. In vitro studies have indicated that SADS-CoV has a wide tissue tropism in different hosts, including humans. However, whether this virus potentially threatens other animals remains unclear. Here, we report the experimental infection of wild-type BALB/c and C57BL/6J suckling mice with SADS-CoV. We found that mice less than 7 days old are susceptible to the virus, which caused notable multitissue infections and damage. The mortality rate was the highest in 2-day-old mice and decreased in older mice. Moreover, a preliminary neuroinflammatory response was observed in 7-day-old SADS-CoV-infected mice. Thus, our results indicate that SADS-CoV has potential pathogenicity in young hosts. IMPORTANCE SADS-CoV, which likely has originated from bat coronaviruses, is highly pathogenic to piglets and poses a threat to the swine industry. Little is known about its potential to disseminate to other animals. No efficient treatment is available, and the quarantine strategy is the only preventive measure. In this study, we demonstrated that SADS-CoV can efficiently replicate in suckling mice younger than 7 days. In contrast to infected piglets, in which intestinal tropism is shown, SADS-CoV caused infection and damage in all murine tissues evaluated in this study. In addition, neuroinflammatory responses were detected in some of the infected mice. Our work provides a preliminary cost-effective model for the screening of antiviral drugs against SADS-CoV infection.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Diarrhea , Mice , Swine Diseases , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diarrhea/complications , Diarrhea/veterinary , Diarrhea/virology , Humans , Mice/virology , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/complications , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/veterinary , Neuroinflammatory Diseases/virology , Swine/virology , Swine Diseases/virology
14.
Pediatr Cardiol ; 43(8): 1728-1736, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941525

ABSTRACT

Multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) causes widespread inflammation including a pancarditis in the weeks following a COVID infection. As we prepare for further coronavirus surges, understanding the medium-term cardiac impacts of this condition is important for allocating healthcare resources. A retrospective single-center study of 67 consecutive patients with MIS-C was performed evaluating echocardiographic and electrocardiographic (ECG) findings to determine the point of worst cardiac dysfunction during the admission, then at intervals of 6-8 weeks and 6-8 months. Worst cardiac function occurred 6.8 ± 2.4 days after the onset of fever with mean 3D left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF) 50.5 ± 9.8%. A pancarditis was typically present: 46.3% had cardiac impairment; 31.3% had pericardial effusion; 26.8% demonstrated moderate (or worse) valvar regurgitation; and 26.8% had coronary dilatation. Cardiac function normalized in all patients by 6-8 weeks (mean 3D LV EF 61.3 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001 compared to presentation). Coronary dilatation resolved in all but one patient who initially developed large aneurysms at presentation, which persisted 6 months later. ECG changes predominantly featured T-wave changes resolving at follow-up. Adverse events included need for ECMO (n = 2), death as an ECMO-related complication (n = 1), LV thrombus formation (n = 1), and subendocardial infarction (n = 1). MIS-C causes a pancarditis. In the majority, discharge from long-term follow-up can be considered as full cardiac recovery is expected by 8 weeks. The exception includes patients with medium sized aneurysms or greater as these may persist and require on-going surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Aneurysm , Coronavirus Infections , Pericardial Effusion , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronary Aneurysm/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications
16.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(4): 475-482, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, causative agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has necessitated widespread lockdown to mitigate the pandemic. This study examines the influence of resilience on the impact of COVID-related stress and enforced lockdown on mental health, drug use, and treatment adherence among people living with HIV (PLWH) in Argentina. SETTING: PLWH residing predominantly in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area and urban regions of Argentina were identified from a private clinic electronic database. METHODS: Participants completed an anonymous online survey to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on economic disruption, resilience, mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety, stress, and loneliness), adherence to HIV treatment, and substance use. We performed ordinary least squares and logistic regressions to test whether resilient coping buffered the impact of economic disruption on mental health and drug use during quarantine. RESULTS: A total of 1336 PLWH aged 18-82 were enrolled. The impact of economic disruption on mental health ΔF(1,1321) = 8.86, P = 0.003 and loneliness ΔF(1,1326) = 5.77, P = 0.016 was buffered by resilience. A 3-way interaction between resilient buffering, stress, and sex was significant ΔF(1,1325) = 4.76, P = 0.029. Participants reported less than excellent adherence to medication (33%), disruption to mental health services (11%), and disruption to substance abuse treatment (1.3%) during lockdown. DISCUSSION: The impact of COVID-stress and lockdown on emotional distress seemed mitigated by resilience coping strategies, and the buffering impact of resilience on perceived stress was greater among women. Results highlight PLWH's capacity to adhere to treatment in challenging circumstances and the importance of developing resilience skills for better coping with stress and adversity.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/psychology , Mental Health/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Argentina , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/trends , Least-Squares Analysis , Logistic Models , Loneliness , Male , Mental Health Services/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/etiology , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Adherence and Compliance , Young Adult
17.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(4): e67-e69, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a new pandemic, and its impact by HIV status is unknown. National reporting does not include gender identity; therefore, data are absent on the impact of COVID-19 on transgender people, including those with HIV. Baseline data from the American Cohort to Study HIV Acquisition Among Transgender Women in High Risk Areas (LITE) Study provide an opportunity to examine pre-COVID factors that may increase vulnerability to COVID-19-related harms among transgender women. SETTING: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Miami, New York City, Washington, DC. METHODS: Baseline data from LITE were analyzed for demographic, psychosocial, and material factors that may affect vulnerability to COVID-related harms. RESULTS: The 1020 participants had high rates of poverty, unemployment, food insecurity, homelessness, and sex work. Transgender women with HIV (n = 273) were older, more likely to be Black, had lower educational attainment, and were more likely to experience material hardship. Mental and behavioral health symptoms were common and did not differ by HIV status. Barriers to health care included being mistreated, provider discomfort serving transgender women, and past negative experiences; as well as material hardships, such as cost and transportation. However, most reported access to material and social support-demonstrating resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Transgender women with HIV may be particularly vulnerable to pandemic harms. Mitigating this harm would benefit everyone, given the highly infectious nature of this coronavirus. Collecting gender identity in COVID-19 data is crucial to inform an effective public health response. Transgender-led organizations' response to this crisis serve as an important model for effective community-led interventions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Transgender Persons/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Boston , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mid-Atlantic Region , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Psychosocial Deprivation , Social Support , Socioeconomic Factors , Southeastern United States
18.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(1): 66-72, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 and its social responses threaten the health of people living with HIV. We conducted a rapid-response interview to assess COVID-19 protective behaviors of people living with HIV and the impact of their responses on HIV-related health care. METHOD: Men and women living with HIV (N = 162) aged 20-37 years participating in a longitudinal study of HIV treatment and care completed routine study measures and an assessment of COVID-19-related experiences. RESULTS: At baseline, most participants demonstrated HIV viremia, markers indicative of renal disorders, and biologically confirmed substance use. At follow-up, in the first month of responding to COVID-19, engaging in more social distancing behaviors was related to difficulty accessing food and medications and increased cancelation of health care appointments, both by self and providers. We observed antiretroviral therapy adherence had improved during the initial month of COVID-19 response. CONCLUSIONS: Factors that may pose added risk for COVID-19 severity were prevalent among people living with HIV, and those with greater risk factors did not practice more COVID-19 protective behaviors. Social distancing and other practices intended to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 interfered with HIV care, and impeded access to food and medications, although an immediate adverse impact on medication adherence was not evident. These results suggest social responses to COVID-19 adversely impacted the health care of people living with HIV, supporting continued monitoring to determine the long-term effects of co-occurring HIV and COVID-19 pandemics.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coinfection/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , HIV Infections/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Coinfection/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Food Supply , Georgia/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/virology , HIV-1 , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Viremia , Young Adult
19.
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars ; 48(Suppl 1): 1-87, 2020 05.
Article in Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835513

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, in the city of Wuhan, in the Hubei province of China, treatment-resistant cases of pneumonia emerged and spread rapidly for reasons unknown. A new strain of coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 [SARS-CoV-2]) was identified and caused the first pandemic of the 21st century. The virus was officially detected in our country on March 11, 2020, and the number of cases increased rapidly; the virus was isolated in 670 patients within 10 days. The rapid increase in the number of patients has required our physicians to learn to protect both the public and themselves when treating patients with this highly infectious disease. The group most affected by the outbreak and with the highest mortality rate is elderly patients with known cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is necessary for cardiology specialists to take an active role in combating the epidemic. The aim of this article is to make a brief assessment of current information regarding the management of cardiovascular patients affected by COVID-19 and to provide practical suggestions to cardiology specialists about problems and questions they have frequently encountered.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiology/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Acta Orthop Belg ; 88(1): 206-210, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836673

ABSTRACT

Heterotopic ossification (HO) designates a bone tissue formation within an atypical anatomical location and is commonly diagnosed in patients whom have suffered major traumas. The following case report presents a non-traumatic source of HO. A causality is deduced between the HO formation and an important inflammatory reaction originating from a Coronavirus infection. In contrast to other studies not only is the source non traumatic but the HO formation is unilateral. In systemic inflammatory reactions vigilance towards HO should be enhanced especially in patients treated during prolonged periods of time in intensive care units (ICU).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Ossification, Heterotopic , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Ossification, Heterotopic/diagnostic imaging , Ossification, Heterotopic/etiology
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