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1.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 12: 958634, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114014

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) seriously affect human health by causing respiratory diseases ranging from common colds to severe acute respiratory diseases. Immunophilins, including peptidyl-prolyl isomerases of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and the cyclophilin family, are promising targets for pharmaceutical inhibition of coronavirus replication, but cell-type specific effects have not been elucidated. FKBPs and cyclophilins bind the immunosuppressive drugs FK506 and cyclosporine A (CsA), respectively. Methods: Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (phBECs) were treated with CsA, Alisporivir (ALV), FK506, and FK506-derived non-immunosuppressive analogs and infected with HCoV-229E. RNA and protein were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblot analysis. Treatment with the same compounds was performed in hepatoma cells (Huh-7.5) infected with HCoV-229E expressing Renilla luciferase (HCoV-229E-RLuc) and the kidney cell line HEK293 transfected with a SARS-CoV-1 replicon expressing Renilla luciferase (SARS-CoV-1-RLuc), followed by quantification of luminescence as a measure of viral replication. Results: Both CsA and ALV robustly inhibited viral replication in all models; both compounds decreased HCoV-229E RNA in phBECs and reduced luminescence in HCoV-229E-RLuc-infected Huh7.5 and SARS-CoV-1-RLuc replicon-transfected HEK293. In contrast, FK506 showed inconsistent and less pronounced effects in phBECs while strongly affecting coronavirus replication in Huh-7.5 and HEK293. Two non-immunosuppressive FK506 analogs had no antiviral effect in any infection model. Conclusion: The immunophilin inhibitors CsA and ALV display robust anti-coronaviral properties in multiple infection models, including phBECs, reflecting a primary site of HCoV infection. In contrast, FK506 displayed cell-type specific effects, strongly affecting CoV replication in Huh7.5 and HEK293, but inconsistently and less pronounced in phBECs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cyclophilins , Cyclosporine/chemistry , Cyclosporine/pharmacology , Cyclosporine/therapeutic use , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Luciferases, Renilla , Pharmaceutical Preparations , RNA , Tacrolimus/chemistry , Tacrolimus/pharmacology , Tacrolimus/therapeutic use , Tacrolimus Binding Proteins/pharmacology , Tacrolimus Binding Proteins/therapeutic use
2.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 12: 976137, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109734

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an enteric coronavirus that causes acute watery diarrhea and vomiting in unweaned piglets. Infections result in high mortality and serious economic losses to the swine industry. PEDV attenuated vaccine does not completely protect against all mutant wild-type strains, and PEDV infection can periodically occur. A sensitive, accurate, and simple detection method for PEDV is needed to reduce the occurrence of the disease. In this study, the CRISPR/Cas13a system was combined with recombinase aided amplification to develop a rapid diagnostic method to distinguish PEDV wild-type strains from attenuated vaccine strains. The method is based on isothermal detection at 37°C. The results are used for visual readout. The assay had high sensitivity and specificity, with a detection limit of 101 copies/µL for the gene of interest, and no cross-reactivity with other pathogens. The Cas13a detection worked well with clinical samples. This visual, sensitive, and specific nucleic acid detection method based on CRISPR/Cas13a should be a powerful tool for detecting PEDV.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Nucleic Acids , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , Swine Diseases , Animals , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Diarrhea , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Recombinases , Sensitivity and Specificity , Swine , Swine Diseases/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics
3.
EMBO Mol Med ; 12(5): e12481, 2020 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025763

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread to many countries around the world, but the infection and death rates vary widely. One country that appeared to have kept the infection under control despite limited societal restrictions is Japan. This commentary explores why Japan may have, up to now, been spared an escalation of the SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Culture , Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated , Genetic Variation , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Immunol ; 13: 881289, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1896683

ABSTRACT

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an emerging coronavirus which causes acute diarrhea and destroys gastrointestinal barrier function in neonatal pigs. Trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) is a protective peptide for maintaining the integrity of gastrointestinal mucosa and reducing intestinal inflammation. However, its role in protecting intestinal epithelium against PEDV infection is still unclear. In this study, we discovered that TFF1 expression was activated in the jejunum of pigs with PEDV infection and TFF1 is required for the growth of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. For instance, inhibited cell proliferation and cell arrest were observed when TFF1 is genetically knocked-out using CRISPR-Cas9. Additionally, TFF1 depletion increased viral copy number and PEDV titer, along with the elevated genes involved in antiviral and inflammatory cytokines. The decreased TFF1 mRNA expression is in line with hypermethylation on the gene promoter. Notably, the strong interactions of protein-DNA complexes containing CCAAT motif significantly increased C/EBPα accessibility, whereas hypermethylation of mC-6 loci decreased C/EBPα binding occupancies in TFF1 promoter. Overall, our findings show that PEDV triggers the C/EBPα-mediated epigenetic regulation of TFF1 in intestine epithelium and facilitates host resistance to PEDV and other Coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , Animals , CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-alpha , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Epigenesis, Genetic , Inflammation/genetics , Jejunum , Methylation , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Swine , Trefoil Factor-1/genetics
7.
Mol Biol Evol ; 39(7)2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890981

ABSTRACT

Transcription regulatory sequences (TRSs), which occur upstream of structural and accessory genes as well as the 5' end of a coronavirus genome, play a critical role in discontinuous transcription in coronaviruses. We introduce two problems collectively aimed at identifying these regulatory sequences as well as their associated genes. First, we formulate the TRS Identification problem of identifying TRS sites in a coronavirus genome sequence with prescribed gene locations. We introduce CORSID-A, an algorithm that solves this problem to optimality in polynomial time. We demonstrate that CORSID-A outperforms existing motif-based methods in identifying TRS sites in coronaviruses. Second, we demonstrate for the first time how TRS sites can be leveraged to identify gene locations in the coronavirus genome. To that end, we formulate the TRS and Gene Identification problem of simultaneously identifying TRS sites and gene locations in unannotated coronavirus genomes. We introduce CORSID to solve this problem, which includes a web-based visualization tool to explore the space of near-optimal solutions. We show that CORSID outperforms state-of-the-art gene finding methods in coronavirus genomes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CORSID enables de novo identification of TRS sites and genes in previously unannotated coronavirus genomes. CORSID is the first method to perform accurate and simultaneous identification of TRS sites and genes in coronavirus genomes without the use of any prior information.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Humans , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Transcription, Genetic
9.
Viruses ; 14(4)2022 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792412

ABSTRACT

Porcine enteric coronaviruses have caused immense economic losses to the global pig industry, and pose a potential risk for cross-species transmission. The clinical symptoms of the porcine enteric coronaviruses (CoVs) are similar, making it difficult to distinguish between the specific pathogens by symptoms alone. Here, a multiplex nucleic acid detection platform based on CRISPR/Cas12a and multiplex reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was developed for the detection of four diarrhea CoVs: porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV), and swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV). With this strategy, we realized a visual colorimetric readout visible to the naked eye without specialized instrumentation by using a ROX-labeled single-stranded DNA-fluorescence-quenched (ssDNA-FQ) reporter. Our method achieved single-copy sensitivity with no cross-reactivity in the identification and detection of the target viruses. In addition, we successfully detected these four enteric CoVs from RNA of clinical samples. Thus, we established a rapid, sensitive, and on-site multiplex molecular differential diagnosis technology for porcine enteric CoVs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus , Swine Diseases , Alphacoronavirus , Animals , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Swine
10.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 9627961, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789057

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report the first complete fox coronavirus (CoV) genome sequence obtained through genome-wide amplifications and to understand the adaptive evolution of fox CoV. Methods: Anal swab samples were collected from 35 foxes to detect the presence of CoV and obtain the virus sequence. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted using MrBayes. The possibility of recombination within these sequences was assessed using GARD. Analysis of the levels of selection pressure experienced by these sequences was assessed using methods on both the PAML and Data Monkey platforms. Results: Of the 35 samples, two were positive, and complete genome sequences for the viruses were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis, using Bayesian methods, of these sequences, together with other CoV sequences, revealed that the fox CoV sequences clustered with canine coronavirus (CCoV) sequences, with sequences from other carnivores more distantly related. In contrast to the feline, ferret and mink CoV sequences that clustered into species-specific clades, the fox CoV fell within the CCoV clade. Minimal evidence for recombination was found among the sequences. A total of 7, 3, 14, and 2 positively selected sites were identified in the M, N, S, and 7B genes, respectively, with 99, 111, and 581 negatively selected sites identified in M, N, and S genes, respectively. Conclusion: The complete genome sequence of fox CoV has been obtained for the first time. The results suggest that the genome sequence of fox CoV may have experienced adaptive evolution in the genes replication, entry, and virulence. The number of sites in each gene that experienced negative selection is far greater than the number that underwent positive selection, suggesting that most of the sequence is highly conserved and important for viral survive. However, positive selection at a few sites likely aided these viruses to adapt to new environments.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus, Canine , Coronavirus , Animals , Bayes Theorem , Cats , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus, Canine/genetics , Dogs , Ferrets/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Phylogeny , Sequence Analysis, DNA
11.
J Virol ; 96(5): e0208621, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736026

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infections induce the expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that in cells infected with gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-8 were drastically upregulated, and the MAP kinase p38 and the integrated stress response pathways were implicated in this process. In this study, we report that coronavirus infection activates a negative regulatory loop that restricts the upregulation of a number of proinflammatory genes. As revealed by the initial transcriptomic and subsequent validation analyses, the anti-inflammatory adenine-uridine (AU)-rich element (ARE)-binding protein, zinc finger protein 36 (ZFP36), and its related family members were upregulated in cells infected with IBV and three other coronaviruses, alphacoronaviruses porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E), and betacoronavirus HCoV-OC43, respectively. Characterization of the functional roles of ZFP36 during IBV infection demonstrated that ZFP36 promoted the degradation of transcripts coding for IL-6, IL-8, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), through binding to AREs in these transcripts. Consistently, knockdown and inhibition of JNK and p38 kinase activities reduced the expression of ZFP36, as well as the expression of IL-6 and IL-8. On the contrary, overexpression of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) and MAPKAP kinase-2 (MK2), the upstream and downstream kinases of p38, respectively, increased the expression of ZFP36 and decreased the expression of IL-8. Taken together, this study reveals an important regulatory role of the MKK3-p38-MK2-ZFP36 axis in coronavirus infection-induced proinflammatory response. IMPORTANCE Excessive and uncontrolled induction and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, the so-called cytokine release syndrome (CRS), would cause life-threatening complications and multiple organ failure in severe coronavirus infections, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and COVID-19. This study reveals that coronavirus infection also induces the expression of ZFP36, an anti-inflammatory ARE-binding protein, promoting the degradation of ARE-containing transcripts coding for IL-6 and IL-8 as well as a number of other proteins related to inflammatory response. Furthermore, the p38 MAP kinase, its upstream kinase MKK3 and downstream kinase MK2 were shown to play a regulatory role in upregulation of ZFP36 during coronavirus infection cycles. This MKK3-p38-MK2-ZFP36 axis would constitute a potential therapeutic target for severe coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Interleukin-8/metabolism , Tristetraprolin/metabolism , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Adenine/metabolism , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Infectious bronchitis virus/metabolism , Infectious bronchitis virus/pathogenicity , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-8/genetics , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Transcriptional Activation , Up-Regulation , Uridine/metabolism , Vero Cells
12.
Viruses ; 12(5)2020 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726011

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is due to infection caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus that impacts the lower respiratory tract. The spectrum of symptoms ranges from asymptomatic infections to mild respiratory symptoms to the lethal form of COVID-19 which is associated with severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress, and fatality. To address this global crisis, up-to-date information on viral genomics and transcriptomics is crucial for understanding the origins and global dispersion of the virus, providing insights into viral pathogenicity, transmission, and epidemiology, and enabling strategies for therapeutic interventions, drug discovery, and vaccine development. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive overview of COVID-19 epidemiology, genomic etiology, findings from recent transcriptomic map analysis, viral-human protein interactions, molecular diagnostics, and the current status of vaccine and novel therapeutic intervention development. Moreover, we provide an extensive list of resources that will help the scientific community access numerous types of databases related to SARS-CoV-2 OMICs and approaches to therapeutics related to COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Genomics , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Vaccines/immunology
13.
Chin Med J (Engl) ; 133(9): 1039-1043, 2020 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A patient's infectivity is determined by the presence of the virus in different body fluids, secretions, and excreta. The persistence and clearance of viral RNA from different specimens of patients with 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) remain unclear. This study analyzed the clearance time and factors influencing 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) RNA in different samples from patients with COVID-19, providing further evidence to improve the management of patients during convalescence. METHODS: The clinical data and laboratory test results of convalescent patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to from January 20, 2020 to February 10, 2020 were collected retrospectively. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results for patients' oropharyngeal swab, stool, urine, and serum samples were collected and analyzed. Convalescent patients refer to recovered non-febrile patients without respiratory symptoms who had two successive (minimum 24 h sampling interval) negative RT-PCR results for viral RNA from oropharyngeal swabs. The effects of cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)+ T lymphocytes, inflammatory indicators, and glucocorticoid treatment on viral nucleic acid clearance were analyzed. RESULTS: In the 292 confirmed cases, 66 patients recovered after treatment and were included in our study. In total, 28 (42.4%) women and 38 men (57.6%) with a median age of 44.0 (34.0-62.0) years were analyzed. After in-hospital treatment, patients' inflammatory indicators decreased with improved clinical condition. The median time from the onset of symptoms to first negative RT-PCR results for oropharyngeal swabs in convalescent patients was 9.5 (6.0-11.0) days. By February 10, 2020, 11 convalescent patients (16.7%) still tested positive for viral RNA from stool specimens and the other 55 patients' stool specimens were negative for 2019-nCoV following a median duration of 11.0 (9.0-16.0) days after symptom onset. Among these 55 patients, 43 had a longer duration until stool specimens were negative for viral RNA than for throat swabs, with a median delay of 2.0 (1.0-4.0) days. Results for only four (6.9%) urine samples were positive for viral nucleic acid out of 58 cases; viral RNA was still present in three patients' urine specimens after throat swabs were negative. Using a multiple linear regression model (F = 2.669, P = 0.044, and adjusted R = 0.122), the analysis showed that the CD4+ T lymphocyte count may help predict the duration of viral RNA detection in patients' stools (t = -2.699, P = 0.010). The duration of viral RNA detection from oropharyngeal swabs and fecal samples in the glucocorticoid treatment group was longer than that in the non-glucocorticoid treatment group (15 days vs. 8.0 days, respectively; t = 2.550, P = 0.013) and the duration of viral RNA detection in fecal samples in the glucocorticoid treatment group was longer than that in the non-glucocorticoid treatment group (20 days vs. 11 days, respectively; t = 4.631, P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in inflammatory indicators between patients with positive fecal viral RNA test results and those with negative results (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In brief, as the clearance of viral RNA in patients' stools was delayed compared to that in oropharyngeal swabs, it is important to identify viral RNA in feces during convalescence. Because of the delayed clearance of viral RNA in the glucocorticoid treatment group, glucocorticoids are not recommended in the treatment of COVID-19, especially for mild disease. The duration of RNA detection may relate to host cell immunity.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Cell Host Microbe ; 27(6): 879-882.e2, 2020 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719463

ABSTRACT

The inflammatory response to SARS-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is thought to underpin COVID-19 pathogenesis. We conducted daily transcriptomic profiling of three COVID-19 cases and found that the early immune response in COVID-19 patients is highly dynamic. Patient throat swabs were tested daily for SARS-CoV-2, with the virus persisting for 3 to 4 weeks in all three patients. Cytokine analyses of whole blood revealed increased cytokine expression in the single most severe case. However, most inflammatory gene expression peaked after respiratory function nadir, except expression in the IL1 pathway. Parallel analyses of CD4 and CD8 expression suggested that the pro-inflammatory response may be intertwined with T cell activation that could exacerbate disease or prolong the infection. Collectively, these findings hint at the possibility that IL1 and related pro-inflammatory pathways may be prognostic and serve as therapeutic targets for COVID-19. This work may also guide future studies to illuminate COVID-19 pathogenesis and develop host-directed therapies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Aged , Biological Variation, Individual , COVID-19 , Cluster Analysis , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Transcriptome , Up-Regulation
15.
J Virol ; 96(4): e0195521, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701123

ABSTRACT

The receptor binding domain (RBD) of the coronavirus spike protein (S) has been verified to be the main target for potent neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in most coronaviruses, and the N-terminal domain (NTD) of some betacoronaviruses has also been indicated to induce nAbs. For alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E, its RBD has been shown to have neutralizing epitopes, and these epitopes could change over time. However, whether neutralizing epitopes exist on the NTD and whether these epitopes change like those of the RBD are still unknown. Here, we verified that neutralizing epitopes exist on the NTD of HCoV-229E. Furthermore, we characterized an NTD targeting nAb 5H10, which could neutralize both pseudotyped and authentic HCoV-229E VR740 in vitro. Epitope mapping indicated that 5H10 targeted motif E1 (147-167 aa) and identified F159 as critical for 5H10 binding. More importantly, our results revealed that motif E1 was highly conserved among clinical isolates except for F159. Further data proved that mutations at position 159 gradually appeared over time and could completely abolish the neutralizing ability of 5H10, supporting the notion that position 159 may be under selective pressure during the human epidemic. In addition, we also found that contemporary clinical serum has a stronger binding capacity for the NTD of contemporary strains than historic strains, proving that the epitope on the NTD could change over time. In summary, these findings define a novel neutralizing epitope on the NTD of HCoV-229E S and provide a theoretical basis for the design of vaccines against HCoV-229E or related coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Characterization of the neutralizing epitope of the spike (S) protein, the major invasion protein of coronaviruses, can help us better understand the evolutionary characteristics of these viruses and promote vaccine development. To date, the neutralizing epitope distribution of alphacoronaviruses is not well known. Here, we identified a neutralizing antibody that targeted the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the alphacoronavirus HCoV-229E S protein. Epitope mapping revealed a novel epitope that was not previously discovered in HCoV-229E. Further studies identified an important residue, F159. Mutations that gradually appeared over time at this site abolished the neutralizing ability of 5H10, indicating that selective pressure occurred at this position in the spread of HCoV-229E. Furthermore, we found that the epitopes within the NTD also changed over time. Taken together, our findings defined a novel neutralizing epitope and highlighted the role of the NTD in the future prevention and control of HCoV-229E or related coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections , Epitopes , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Amino Acid Motifs , Animals , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0278021, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700612

ABSTRACT

Understanding the immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is critical to overcome the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Efforts are being made to understand the potential cross-protective immunity of memory T cells, induced by prior encounters with seasonal coronaviruses, in providing protection against severe COVID-19. In this study we assessed T-cell responses directed against highly conserved regions of SARS-CoV-2. Epitope mapping revealed 16 CD8+ T-cell epitopes across the nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), and open reading frame (ORF)3a proteins of SARS-CoV-2 and five CD8+ T-cell epitopes encoded within the highly conserved regions of the ORF1ab polyprotein of SARS-CoV-2. Comparative sequence analysis showed high conservation of SARS-CoV-2 ORF1ab T-cell epitopes in seasonal coronaviruses. Paradoxically, the immune responses directed against the conserved ORF1ab epitopes were infrequent and subdominant in both convalescent and unexposed participants. This subdominant immune response was consistent with a low abundance of ORF1ab encoded proteins in SARS-CoV-2 infected cells. Overall, these observations suggest that while cross-reactive CD8+ T cells likely exist in unexposed individuals, they are not common and therefore are unlikely to play a significant role in providing broad preexisting immunity in the community. IMPORTANCE T cells play a critical role in protection against SARS-CoV-2. Despite being highly topical, the protective role of preexisting memory CD8+ T cells, induced by prior exposure to circulating common coronavirus strains, remains less clear. In this study, we established a robust approach to specifically assess T cell responses to highly conserved regions within SARS-CoV-2. Consistent with recent observations we demonstrate that recognition of these highly conserved regions is associated with an increased likelihood of milder disease. However, extending these observations we observed that recognition of these conserved regions is rare in both exposed and unexposed volunteers, which we believe is associated with the low abundance of these proteins in SARS-CoV-2 infected cells. These observations have important implications for the likely role preexisting immunity plays in controlling severe disease, further emphasizing the importance of vaccination to generate the immunodominant T cells required for immune protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Conserved Sequence , Coronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Reactions , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/genetics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
Arch Microbiol ; 204(1): 77, 2021 Dec 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588812

ABSTRACT

The aim of this scoping review was to identify knowledge gaps and to describe the current state of the research on the association between TMPRSS2 and the essential beta coronaviruses (Beta-CoVs) infection and the molecular mechanisms for this association. We searched MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). We included 13 studies. Evidence shows an essential role of TMPRSS2 in Spike protein activation, entry, and spread into host cells. Co-expression of TMPRSS2 with cell surface receptors (ACE2 or DPP4) increased virus entry. This serine protease is involved in the formation of large syncytia between infected cells. TMPRSS2 cleaved the Spike protein of SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and MERS-CoV, and increased virus propagation. Accumulating evidence suggests that TMPRSS2 is an essential protease for virus replication. We highlighted its critical molecular role in membrane fusion and the impact in viral mRNA replication, then promoting/driving pathogenesis and resistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Line , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Virus Internalization
19.
BMC Med Genomics ; 14(Suppl 6): 289, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virus screening and viral genome reconstruction are urgent and crucial for the rapid identification of viral pathogens, i.e., tracing the source and understanding the pathogenesis when a viral outbreak occurs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides an efficient and unbiased way to identify viral pathogens in host-associated and environmental samples without prior knowledge. Despite the availability of software, data analysis still requires human operations. A mature pipeline is urgently needed when thousands of viral pathogen and viral genome reconstruction samples need to be rapidly identified. RESULTS: In this paper, we present a rapid and accurate workflow to screen metagenomics sequencing data for viral pathogens and other compositions, as well as enable a reference-based assembler to reconstruct viral genomes. Moreover, we tested our workflow on several metagenomics datasets, including a SARS-CoV-2 patient sample with NGS data, pangolins tissues with NGS data, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-infected cells with NGS data, etc. Our workflow demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency when identifying target viruses from large scale NGS metagenomics data. Our workflow was flexible when working with a broad range of NGS datasets from small (kb) to large (100 Gb). This took from a few minutes to a few hours to complete each task. At the same time, our workflow automatically generates reports that incorporate visualized feedback (e.g., metagenomics data quality statistics, host and viral sequence compositions, details about each of the identified viral pathogens and their coverages, and reassembled viral pathogen sequences based on their closest references). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our system enabled the rapid screening and identification of viral pathogens from metagenomics data, providing an important piece to support viral pathogen research during a pandemic. The visualized report contains information from raw sequence quality to a reconstructed viral sequence, which allows non-professional people to screen their samples for viruses by themselves (Additional file 1).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Computational Biology/methods , Genome, Viral , Genomics , Metagenomics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Algorithms , Animals , Automation , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Pandemics , Pangolins , Reference Values , Software , Transcriptome , Workflow
20.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(11): e1009560, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523396

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of COVID-19, is of zoonotic origin. Evolutionary analyses assessing whether coronaviruses similar to SARS-CoV-2 infected ancestral species of modern-day animal hosts could be useful in identifying additional reservoirs of potentially dangerous coronaviruses. We reasoned that if a clade of species has been repeatedly exposed to a virus, then their proteins relevant for viral entry may exhibit adaptations that affect host susceptibility or response. We perform comparative analyses across the mammalian phylogeny of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cellular receptor for SARS-CoV-2, in order to uncover evidence for selection acting at its binding interface with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We uncover that in rodents there is evidence for adaptive amino acid substitutions at positions comprising the ACE2-spike interaction interface, whereas the variation within ACE2 proteins in primates and some other mammalian clades is not consistent with evolutionary adaptations. We also analyze aminopeptidase N (APN), the receptor for the human coronavirus 229E, a virus that causes the common cold, and find evidence for adaptation in primates. Altogether, our results suggest that the rodent and primate lineages may have had ancient exposures to viruses similar to SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-229E, respectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adaptation, Physiological/genetics , Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , CD13 Antigens/genetics , CD13 Antigens/physiology , Common Cold/genetics , Common Cold/virology , Computational Biology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Evolution, Molecular , Genomics , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Host Specificity/genetics , Host Specificity/physiology , Humans , Mammals/genetics , Mammals/virology , Phylogeny , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Selection, Genetic , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Virus Internalization
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