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1.
Clin Immunol ; 223: 108652, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064949

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 reminds us that the emerging and reemerging respiratory virus infections pose a continuing threat to human life. Cytokine storm syndromes of viral origin seem to have a common pathogenesis of the imbalanced immune response with the exaggerated inflammatory reaction combined with the reduction and functional exhaustion of T cells. Immunomodulatory therapy is gaining interest in COVID-19, but this strategy has received less attention in other respiratory viral infections than it deserved. In this review we suggest that based on the similarities of the immune dysfunction in the severe cases of different respiratory viral infections, some lessons from the immunomodulatory therapy of COVID-19 (particularly regarding the choice of an immunomodulatory drug, the selection of patients and optimal time window for this kind of therapy) could be applied for some cases of severe influenza infection and probably for some future outbreaks of novel severe respiratory viral infections.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Immunotherapy/methods , Influenza, Human/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Orthomyxoviridae/physiology , SARS Virus/physiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunomodulation , Inflammation
2.
Science ; 371(6530): 735-741, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066809

ABSTRACT

Protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and SARS-related emergent zoonotic coronaviruses is urgently needed. We made homotypic nanoparticles displaying the receptor binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 or co-displaying SARS-CoV-2 RBD along with RBDs from animal betacoronaviruses that represent threats to humans (mosaic nanoparticles with four to eight distinct RBDs). Mice immunized with RBD nanoparticles, but not soluble antigen, elicited cross-reactive binding and neutralization responses. Mosaic RBD nanoparticles elicited antibodies with superior cross-reactive recognition of heterologous RBDs relative to sera from immunizations with homotypic SARS-CoV-2-RBD nanoparticles or COVID-19 convalescent human plasmas. Moreover, after priming, sera from mosaic RBD-immunized mice neutralized heterologous pseudotyped coronaviruses as well as or better than sera from homotypic SARS-CoV-2-RBD nanoparticle immunizations, demonstrating no loss of immunogenicity against particular RBDs resulting from co-display. A single immunization with mosaic RBD nanoparticles provides a potential strategy to simultaneously protect against SARS-CoV-2 and emerging zoonotic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Nanoparticles , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cross Reactions , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Immune Sera/immunology , Immunization , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , /virology
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055069

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel epidemic strain of Betacoronavirus that is responsible for the current viral pandemic, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a global health crisis. Other epidemic Betacoronaviruses include the 2003 SARS-CoV-1 and the 2009 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the genomes of which, particularly that of SARS-CoV-1, are similar to that of the 2019 SARS-CoV-2. In this extensive review, we document the most recent information on Coronavirus proteins, with emphasis on the membrane proteins in the Coronaviridae family. We include information on their structures, functions, and participation in pathogenesis. While the shared proteins among the different coronaviruses may vary in structure and function, they all seem to be multifunctional, a common theme interconnecting these viruses. Many transmembrane proteins encoded within the SARS-CoV-2 genome play important roles in the infection cycle while others have functions yet to be understood. We compare the various structural and nonstructural proteins within the Coronaviridae family to elucidate potential overlaps and parallels in function, focusing primarily on the transmembrane proteins and their influences on host membrane arrangements, secretory pathways, cellular growth inhibition, cell death and immune responses during the viral replication cycle. We also offer bioinformatic analyses of potential viroporin activities of the membrane proteins and their sequence similarities to the Envelope (E) protein. In the last major part of the review, we discuss complement, stimulation of inflammation, and immune evasion/suppression that leads to CoV-derived severe disease and mortality. The overall pathogenesis and disease progression of CoVs is put into perspective by indicating several stages in the resulting infection process in which both host and antiviral therapies could be targeted to block the viral cycle. Lastly, we discuss the development of adaptive immunity against various structural proteins, indicating specific vulnerable regions in the proteins. We discuss current CoV vaccine development approaches with purified proteins, attenuated viruses and DNA vaccines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , /metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Genome, Viral , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immune Evasion , Protein Interaction Maps , /immunology , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication
4.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8870425, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052344

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections are the three epidemiological diseases caused by the Coronaviridae family. Perceiving the immune responses in these infections and the escape of viruses could help us design drugs and vaccines for confronting these infections. This review investigates the innate and adaptive immune responses reported in the infections of the three coronaviruses SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. Moreover, the present study can trigger researchers to design and develop new vaccines and drugs based on immune system responses. In conclusion, due to the need for an effective and efficient immune stimulation against coronavirus, a combination of several strategies seems necessary for developing the vaccine.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control
5.
Cell Rep ; 34(7): 108737, 2021 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046536

ABSTRACT

In the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there remain unanswered questions regarding the nature and significance of the humoral immune response toward other coronavirus infections. Here, we investigate the cross-reactivity of antibodies raised against the first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) for their reactivity toward SARS-CoV-2. We extensively characterize a selection of 10 antibodies covering all of the SARS-CoV structural proteins: spike, membrane, nucleocapsid, and envelope. Although nearly all of the examined SARS-CoV antibodies display some level of reactivity to SARS-CoV-2, we find only partial cross-neutralization for the spike antibodies. The implications of our work are two-fold. First, we establish a set of antibodies with known reactivity to both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, which will allow further study of both viruses. Second, we provide empirical evidence of the high propensity for antibody cross-reactivity between distinct strains of human coronaviruses, which is critical information for designing diagnostic and vaccine strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , /immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Reactions/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Pandemics , SARS Virus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
6.
J Exp Med ; 218(3)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044017

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has been responsible for over 42 million infections and 1 million deaths since its emergence in December 2019. There are few therapeutic options and no approved vaccines. Here, we examine the properties of highly potent human monoclonal antibodies (hu-mAbs) in a Syrian hamster model of SARS-CoV-2 and in a mouse-adapted model of SARS-CoV-2 infection (SARS-CoV-2 MA). Antibody combinations were effective for prevention and in therapy when administered early. However, in vitro antibody neutralization potency did not uniformly correlate with in vivo protection, and some hu-mAbs were more protective in combination in vivo. Analysis of antibody Fc regions revealed that binding to activating Fc receptors contributes to optimal protection against SARS-CoV-2 MA. The data indicate that intact effector function can affect hu-mAb protective activity and that in vivo testing is required to establish optimal hu-mAb combinations for COVID-19 prevention.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy
7.
Science ; 371(6530): 741-745, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029163

ABSTRACT

We are currently faced with the question of how the severity of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may change in the years ahead. Our analysis of immunological and epidemiological data on endemic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) shows that infection-blocking immunity wanes rapidly but that disease-reducing immunity is long-lived. Our model, incorporating these components of immunity, recapitulates both the current severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the benign nature of HCoVs, suggesting that once the endemic phase is reached and primary exposure is in childhood, SARS-CoV-2 may be no more virulent than the common cold. We predict a different outcome for an emergent coronavirus that causes severe disease in children. These results reinforce the importance of behavioral containment during pandemic vaccine rollout, while prompting us to evaluate scenarios for continuing vaccination in the endemic phase.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Endemic Diseases , Adaptive Immunity , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , /transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Endemic Diseases/prevention & control , Epidemics , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Infant , /pathogenicity , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Cell ; 182(4): 828-842.e16, 2020 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027977

ABSTRACT

Neutralizing antibody responses to coronaviruses mainly target the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the trimeric spike. Here, we characterized polyclonal immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) and Fabs from COVID-19 convalescent individuals for recognition of coronavirus spikes. Plasma IgGs differed in their focus on RBD epitopes, recognition of alpha- and beta-coronaviruses, and contributions of avidity to increased binding/neutralization of IgGs over Fabs. Using electron microscopy, we examined specificities of polyclonal plasma Fabs, revealing recognition of both S1A and RBD epitopes on SARS-CoV-2 spike. Moreover, a 3.4 Å cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a neutralizing monoclonal Fab-spike complex revealed an epitope that blocks ACE2 receptor binding. Modeling based on these structures suggested different potentials for inter-spike crosslinking by IgGs on viruses, and characterized IgGs would not be affected by identified SARS-CoV-2 spike mutations. Overall, our studies structurally define a recurrent anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody class derived from VH3-53/VH3-66 and similarity to a SARS-CoV VH3-30 antibody, providing criteria for evaluating vaccine-elicited antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/chemistry , Immunoglobulin G/chemistry , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross Reactions , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/blood , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/isolation & purification , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/ultrastructure , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/isolation & purification , Immunoglobulin G/ultrastructure , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/chemistry , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
11.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 44(8): 1793-1799, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023842

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that colchicine may have metabolic and cardiovascular and benefits in at-risk patients; however, the mechanisms through which colchicine may improve outcomes are still unclear. We sought to examine colchicine's effects on circulating inflammatory and metabolic molecules in adults with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected pre- and post-intervention during a double-blind randomized controlled trial in which 40 adults with obesity and MetS were randomized to colchicine 0.6 mg or placebo twice-daily for 3 months. Serum samples were analyzed for 1305 circulating factors using the SomaScan Platform. The Benjamini-Hochberg procedure was used to adjust the false discovery rate (FDR) for multiple testing. RESULTS: At baseline, age (48.0 ± 13.8 vs. 44.7 ± 10.3 years) and BMI (39.8 ± 6.4 vs. 41.8 ± 8.2 kg/m2) were not different between groups. After controlling for the FDR, 34 molecules were significantly changed by colchicine. Colchicine decreased concentrations of multiple inflammatory molecules, including C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, and resistin, in addition to vascular-related proteins (e.g., oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor, phosphodiesterase 5A). Conversely, relative to placebo, colchicine significantly increased concentrations of eight molecules including secreted factors associated with metabolism and anti-thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: In adults with obesity, colchicine significantly affected concentrations of proteins involved in the innate immune system, endothelial function and atherosclerosis, uncovering new mechanisms behind its cardiometabolic effects. Further research is warranted to investigate whether colchicine's IL-6 suppressive effects may be beneficial in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Colchicine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/immunology , Obesity/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , C-Reactive Protein , Colchicine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Interleukin-6 , Male , Metabolic Syndrome/drug therapy , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
13.
Life Sci ; 253: 117723, 2020 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023706

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has quickly progressed to a global health emergency. Respiratory illness is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients with the disease spectrum ranging from asymptomatic subclinical infection, to severe pneumonia progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is growing evidence describing pathophysiological resemblance of SARS-CoV-2 infection with other coronavirus infections such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-2 receptors play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the virus. Disruption of this receptor leads to cardiomyopathy, cardiac dysfunction, and heart failure. Patients with cardiovascular disease are more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 and they are more likely to develop severe symptoms. Hypertension, arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are amongst major cardiovascular disease comorbidities seen in severe cases of COVID-19. There is growing literature exploring cardiac involvement in SARS-CoV-2. Myocardial injury is one of the important pathogenic features of COVID-19. As a surrogate for myocardial injury, multiple studies have shown increased cardiac biomarkers mainly cardiac troponins I and T in the infected patients especially those with severe disease. Myocarditis is depicted as another cause of morbidity amongst COVID-19 patients. The exact mechanisms of how SARS-CoV-2 can cause myocardial injury are not clearly understood. The proposed mechanisms of myocardial injury are direct damage to the cardiomyocytes, systemic inflammation, myocardial interstitial fibrosis, interferon mediated immune response, exaggerated cytokine response by Type 1 and 2 helper T cells, in addition to coronary plaque destabilization, and hypoxia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Myocarditis/virology , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology
15.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 19, 2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024366

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cross-reactivity to SARS-CoV-2 from exposure to endemic human coronaviruses (eHCoV) is gaining increasing attention as a possible driver of both protection against infection and COVID-19 severity. Here we explore the potential role of cross-reactivity induced by eHCoVs on age-specific COVID-19 severity in a mathematical model of eHCoV and SARS-CoV-2 transmission. METHODS: We use an individual-based model, calibrated to prior knowledge of eHCoV dynamics, to fully track individual histories of exposure to eHCoVs. We also model the emergent dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 and the risk of hospitalisation upon infection. RESULTS: We hypothesise that primary exposure with any eHCoV confers temporary cross-protection against severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, while life-long re-exposure to the same eHCoV diminishes cross-protection, and increases the potential for disease severity. We show numerically that our proposed mechanism can explain age patterns of COVID-19 hospitalisation in EU/EEA countries and the UK. We further show that some of the observed variation in health care capacity and testing efforts is compatible with country-specific differences in hospitalisation rates under this model. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a "proof of possibility" for certain biological and epidemiological mechanisms that could potentially drive COVID-19-related variation across age groups. Our findings call for further research on the role of cross-reactivity to eHCoVs and highlight data interpretation challenges arising from health care capacity and SARS-CoV-2 testing.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Cross Protection/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , /immunology , Age Factors , /immunology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Endemic Diseases , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunity, Heterologous/immunology , Patient-Specific Modeling , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Nat Biotechnol ; 38(9): 1073-1078, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023948

ABSTRACT

A robust serological test to detect neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is urgently needed to determine not only the infection rate, herd immunity and predicted humoral protection, but also vaccine efficacy during clinical trials and after large-scale vaccination. The current gold standard is the conventional virus neutralization test requiring live pathogen and a biosafety level 3 laboratory. Here, we report a SARS-CoV-2 surrogate virus neutralization test that detects total immunodominant neutralizing antibodies targeting the viral spike (S) protein receptor-binding domain in an isotype- and species-independent manner. Our simple and rapid test is based on antibody-mediated blockage of the interaction between the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor protein and the receptor-binding domain. The test, which has been validated with two cohorts of patients with COVID-19 in two different countries, achieves 99.93% specificity and 95-100% sensitivity, and differentiates antibody responses to several human coronaviruses. The surrogate virus neutralization test does not require biosafety level 3 containment, making it broadly accessible to the wider community for both research and clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Antibodies/immunology , Antibodies/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
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