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1.
J Virol ; 94(13)2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583223

ABSTRACT

Fusion with, and subsequent entry into, the host cell is one of the critical steps in the life cycle of enveloped viruses. For Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the spike (S) protein is the main determinant of viral entry. Proteolytic cleavage of the S protein exposes its fusion peptide (FP), which initiates the process of membrane fusion. Previous studies on the related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) FP have shown that calcium ions (Ca2+) play an important role in fusogenic activity via a Ca2+ binding pocket with conserved glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues. SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV FPs share a high sequence homology, and here, we investigated whether Ca2+ is required for MERS-CoV fusion by screening a mutant array in which E and D residues in the MERS-CoV FP were substituted with neutrally charged alanines (A). Upon verifying mutant cell surface expression and proteolytic cleavage, we tested their ability to mediate pseudoparticle (PP) infection of host cells in modulating Ca2+ environments. Our results demonstrate that intracellular Ca2+ enhances MERS-CoV wild-type (WT) PP infection by approximately 2-fold and that E891 is a crucial residue for Ca2+ interaction. Subsequent electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments revealed that this enhancement could be attributed to Ca2+ increasing MERS-CoV FP fusion-relevant membrane ordering. Intriguingly, isothermal calorimetry showed an approximate 1:1 MERS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, as opposed to an 1:2 SARS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, suggesting significant differences in FP Ca2+ interactions of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV FP despite their high sequence similarity.IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a major emerging infectious disease with zoonotic potential and has reservoirs in dromedary camels and bats. Since its first outbreak in 2012, the virus has repeatedly transmitted from camels to humans, with 2,468 confirmed cases causing 851 deaths. To date, there are no efficacious drugs and vaccines against MERS-CoV, increasing its potential to cause a public health emergency. In order to develop novel drugs and vaccines, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that enable the virus to infect host cells. Our data have found that calcium is an important regulator of viral fusion by interacting with negatively charged residues in the MERS-CoV FP region. This information can guide therapeutic solutions to block this calcium interaction and also repurpose already approved drugs for this use for a fast response to MERS-CoV outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Ions/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Virus Internalization , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Proteolysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells , Virulence , Virus Assembly
2.
J Virol ; 95(16): e0018721, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486048

ABSTRACT

Subversion of the host cell cycle to facilitate viral replication is a common feature of coronavirus infections. Coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein can modulate the host cell cycle, but the mechanistic details remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) N protein on the cell cycle and the influence on viral replication. Results indicated that PEDV N induced Vero E6 cell cycle arrest at S-phase, which promoted viral replication (P < 0.05). S-phase arrest was dependent on the N protein nuclear localization signal S71NWHFYYLGTGPHADLRYRT90 and the interaction between N protein and p53. In the nucleus, the binding of N protein to p53 maintained consistently high-level expression of p53, which activated the p53-DREAM pathway. The key domain of the N protein interacting with p53 was revealed to be S171RGNSQNRGNNQGRGASQNRGGNN194 (NS171-N194), in which G183RG185 are core residues. NS171-N194 and G183RG185 were essential for N-induced S-phase arrest. Moreover, small molecular drugs targeting the NS171-N194 domain of the PEDV N protein were screened through molecular docking. Hyperoside could antagonize N protein-induced S-phase arrest by interfering with interaction between N protein and p53 and inhibit viral replication (P < 0.05). The above-described experiments were also validated in porcine intestinal cells, and data were in line with results in Vero E6 cells. Therefore, these results reveal the PEDV N protein interacts with p53 to activate the p53-DREAM pathway, and subsequently induces S-phase arrest to create a favorable environment for virus replication. These findings provide new insight into the PEDV-host interaction and the design of novel antiviral strategies against PEDV. IMPORTANCE Many viruses subvert the host cell cycle to create a cellular environment that promotes viral growth. PEDV, an emerging and reemerging coronavirus, has led to substantial economic loss in the global swine industry. Our study is the first to demonstrate that PEDV N-induced cell cycle arrest during the S-phase promotes viral replication. We identified a novel mechanism of PEDV N-induced S-phase arrest, where the binding of PEDV N protein to p53 maintains consistently high levels of p53 expression in the nucleus to mediate S-phase arrest by activating the p53-DREAM pathway. Furthermore, a small molecular compound, hyperoside, targeted the PEDV N protein, interfering with the interaction between the N protein and p53 and, importantly, inhibited PEDV replication by antagonizing cell cycle arrest. This study reveals a new mechanism of PEDV-host interaction and also provides a novel antiviral strategy for PEDV. These data provide a foundation for further research into coronavirus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nuclear Localization Signals , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacology , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Signal Transduction , Swine , Swine Diseases/drug therapy , Swine Diseases/genetics , Swine Diseases/metabolism , Swine Diseases/virology , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 16824, 2020 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387453

ABSTRACT

The biological mechanisms involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection are only partially understood. Thus we explored the plasma metabolome of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 to search for diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers and to improve the knowledge of metabolic disturbance in this infection. We analyzed the plasma metabolome of 55 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 and 45 controls by LC-HRMS at the time of viral diagnosis (D0). We first evaluated the ability to predict the diagnosis from the metabotype at D0 in an independent population. Next, we assessed the feasibility of predicting the disease evolution at the 7th and 15th day. Plasma metabolome allowed us to generate a discriminant multivariate model to predict the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 in an independent population (accuracy > 74%, sensitivity, specificity > 75%). We identified the role of the cytosine and tryptophan-nicotinamide pathways in this discrimination. However, metabolomic exploration modestly explained the disease evolution. Here, we present the first metabolomic study in SARS-CoV-2 patients which showed a high reliable prediction of early diagnosis. We have highlighted the role of the tryptophan-nicotinamide pathway clearly linked to inflammatory signals and microbiota, and the involvement of cytosine, previously described as a coordinator of cell metabolism in SARS-CoV-2. These findings could open new therapeutic perspectives as indirect targets.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cytosine/blood , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , Niacinamide/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Tryptophan/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Early Diagnosis , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Fertil Steril ; 114(2): 223-232, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385570

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the susceptibility of the endometrium to infection by-and thereby potential damage from-SARS-CoV-2. DESIGN: Analysis of SARS-Cov-2 infection-related gene expression from endometrial transcriptomic data sets. SETTING: Infertility research department affiliated with a public hospital. PATIENT(S): Gene expression data from five studies in 112 patients with normal endometrium collected throughout the menstrual cycle. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Gene expression and correlation between viral infectivity genes and age throughout the menstrual cycle. RESULT(S): Gene expression was high for TMPRSS4, CTSL, CTSB, FURIN, MX1, and BSG; medium for TMPRSS2; and low for ACE2. ACE2, TMPRSS4, CTSB, CTSL, and MX1 expression increased toward the window of implantation. TMPRSS4 expression was positively correlated with ACE2, CTSB, CTSL, MX1, and FURIN during several cycle phases; TMPRSS2 was not statistically significantly altered across the cycle. ACE2, TMPRSS4, CTSB, CTSL, BSG, and MX1 expression increased with age, especially in early phases of the cycle. CONCLUSION(S): Endometrial tissue is likely safe from SARS-CoV-2 cell entry based on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression, but susceptibility increases with age. Further, TMPRSS4, along with BSG-mediated viral entry into cells, could imply a susceptible environment for SARS-CoV-2 entry via different mechanisms. Additional studies are warranted to determine the true risk of endometrial infection by SARS-CoV-2 and implications for fertility treatments.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endometrium/metabolism , Endometrium/virology , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Adult , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Female , Humans , Menstrual Cycle , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/biosynthesis , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
10.
Pharmacol Res Perspect ; 9(1): e00691, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384293

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses represent global health threat. In this century, they have already caused two epidemics and one serious pandemic. Although, at present, there are no approved drugs and therapies for the treatment and prevention of human coronaviruses, several agents, FDA-approved, and preclinical, have shown in vitro and/or in vivo antiviral activity. An in-depth analysis of the current situation leads to the identification of several potential drugs that could have an impact on the fight against coronaviruses infections. In this review, we discuss the virology of human coronaviruses highlighting the main biological targets and summarize the current state-of-the-art of possible therapeutic options to inhibit coronaviruses infections. We mostly focus on FDA-approved and preclinical drugs targeting viral conserved elements.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Azoles/administration & dosage , Azoles/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Humans , Isoindoles , Naphthoquinones/administration & dosage , Naphthoquinones/metabolism , Organoselenium Compounds/administration & dosage , Organoselenium Compounds/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy
11.
Viruses ; 12(10)2020 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389518

ABSTRACT

To address the expression pattern of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor ACE2 and the viral priming protease TMPRSS2 in the respiratory tract, this study investigated RNA sequencing transcriptome profiling of samples of airway and oral mucosa. As shown, ACE2 has medium levels of expression in both small airway epithelium and masticatory mucosa, and high levels of expression in nasal epithelium. The expression of ACE2 is low in mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and cannot be detected in alveolar macrophages. TMPRSS2 is highly expressed in small airway epithelium and nasal epithelium and has lower expression in masticatory mucosa. Our results provide the molecular basis that the nasal mucosa is the most susceptible locus in the respiratory tract for SARS-CoV-2 infection and consequently for subsequent droplet transmission and should be the focus for protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/biosynthesis , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelium/metabolism , Epithelium/virology , Gene Expression , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Nasal Mucosa/metabolism , Nasal Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory System/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
12.
Molecules ; 25(12)2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389454

ABSTRACT

Viruses can be spread from one person to another; therefore, they may cause disorders in many people, sometimes leading to epidemics and even pandemics. New, previously unstudied viruses and some specific mutant or recombinant variants of known viruses constantly appear. An example is a variant of coronaviruses (CoV) causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), named SARS-CoV-2. Some antiviral drugs, such as remdesivir as well as antiretroviral drugs including darunavir, lopinavir, and ritonavir are suggested to be effective in treating disorders caused by SARS-CoV-2. There are data on the utilization of antiretroviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Since there are many studies aimed at the identification of the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and the development of novel therapeutic approaches against HIV-1, we used HIV-1 for our case study to identify possible molecular pathways shared by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We applied a text and data mining workflow and identified a list of 46 targets, which can be essential for the development of infections caused by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We show that SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1 share some molecular pathways involved in inflammation, immune response, cell cycle regulation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Data Mining/methods , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antigens, Differentiation/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Complement System Proteins/genetics , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Regulation , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV-1/drug effects , HIV-1/immunology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Inflammation , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Interleukins/genetics , Interleukins/immunology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/immunology
15.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5148, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376197

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infection in humans is usually associated to respiratory tract illnesses, ranging in severity from mild to life-threatening respiratory failure. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) was recently identified as a host factor for Zika and dengue viruses; AHR antagonists boost antiviral immunity, decrease viral titers and ameliorate Zika-induced pathology in vivo. Here we report that AHR is activated by infection with different coronaviruses, potentially impacting antiviral immunity and lung epithelial cells. Indeed, the analysis of single-cell RNA-seq from lung tissue detected increased expression of AHR and AHR transcriptional targets, suggesting AHR signaling activation in SARS-CoV-2-infected epithelial cells from COVID-19 patients. Moreover, we detected an association between AHR expression and viral load in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. Finally, we found that the pharmacological inhibition of AHR suppressed the replication in vitro of one of the causative agents of the common cold, HCoV-229E, and the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2. Taken together, these findings suggest that AHR activation is a common strategy used by coronaviruses to evade antiviral immunity and promote viral replication, which may also contribute to lung pathology. Future studies should further evaluate the potential of AHR as a target for host-directed antiviral therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus/physiology , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Signal Transduction , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
16.
Cells ; 10(8)2021 08 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348606

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has instantaneously emerged as a worldwide pandemic. However, humans encountered other coronaviruses in the past, and they caused a broad range of symptoms, from mild to life-threatening, depending on the virus and immunocompetence of the host. Most human coronaviruses interact with the proteins and/or double-membrane vesicles of autophagy, the membrane trafficking pathway that degrades and recycles the intracellular protein aggregates, organelles, and pathogens, including viruses. However, coronaviruses often neutralize and hijack this pathway to complete their life cycle. In this review, we discuss the interactions of human coronaviruses and autophagy, including recent data from SARS-CoV-2-related studies. Some of these interactions (for example, viral block of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion), while being conserved across multiple coronaviruses, are accomplished via different molecular mechanisms. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular interplay between human coronaviruses and autophagy for developing efficient therapies against coronaviral diseases.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Humans , Lysosomes , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
17.
Elife ; 92020 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344522

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients can present with pulmonary edema early in disease. We propose that this is due to a local vascular problem because of activation of bradykinin 1 receptor (B1R) and B2R on endothelial cells in the lungs. SARS-CoV-2 enters the cell via ACE2 that next to its role in RAAS is needed to inactivate des-Arg9 bradykinin, the potent ligand of the B1R. Without ACE2 acting as a guardian to inactivate the ligands of B1R, the lung environment is prone for local vascular leakage leading to angioedema. Here, we hypothesize that a kinin-dependent local lung angioedema via B1R and eventually B2R is an important feature of COVID-19. We propose that blocking the B2R and inhibiting plasma kallikrein activity might have an ameliorating effect on early disease caused by COVID-19 and might prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition, this pathway might indirectly be responsive to anti-inflammatory agents.


The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented threat to global health. Millions of cases have been confirmed around the world, and hundreds of thousands of people have lost their lives. Common symptoms include a fever and persistent cough and COVID-19 patients also often experience an excess of fluid in the lungs, which makes it difficult to breathe. In some cases, this develops into a life-threatening condition whereby the lungs cannot provide the body's vital organs with enough oxygen. The SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, enters the lining of the lungs via an enzyme called the ACE2 receptor, which is present on the outer surface of the lungs' cells. The related coronavirus that was responsible for the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s also needs the ACE2 receptor to enter the cells of the lungs. In SARS, the levels of ACE2 in the lung decline during the infection. Studies with mice have previously revealed that a shortage of ACE2 leads to increased levels of a hormone called angiotensin II, which regulates blood pressure. As a result, much attention has turned to the potential link between this hormone system in relation to COVID-19. However, other mouse studies have shown that ACE2 protects against a build-up of fluid in the lungs caused by a different molecule made by the body. This molecule, which is actually a small fragment of a protein, lowers blood pressure and causes fluid to leak out of blood vessels. It belongs to a family of molecules known as kinins, and ACE2 is known to inactivate certain kinins. This led van de Veerdonk et al. to propose that the excess of fluid in the lungs seen in COVID-19 patients may be because kinins are not being neutralized due to the shortage of the ACE2 receptor. This had not been hypothesized before, even though the mechanism could be the same in SARS which has been researched for the past 17 years. If this hypothesis is correct, it would mean that directly inhibiting the receptor for the kinins (or the proteins that they come from) may be the only way to stop fluid leaking into the lungs of COVID-19 patients in the early stage of disease. This hypothesis is unproven, and more work is needed to see if it is clinically relevant. If that work provides a proof of concept, it means that existing treatments and registered drugs could potentially help patients with COVID-19, by preventing the need for mechanical ventilation and saving many lives.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Drug Development , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Angioedema/drug therapy , Angioedema/metabolism , Angioedema/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Bradykinin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Kallikreins/metabolism , Kinins/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptor, Bradykinin B1/metabolism , Receptor, Bradykinin B2/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction
19.
Genes Dev ; 35(13-14): 1005-1019, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334329

ABSTRACT

N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant internal RNA modification, influencing transcript fate and function in uninfected and virus-infected cells. Installation of m6A by the nuclear RNA methyltransferase METTL3 occurs cotranscriptionally; however, the genomes of some cytoplasmic RNA viruses are also m6A-modified. How the cellular m6A modification machinery impacts coronavirus replication, which occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm, is unknown. Here we show that replication of SARS-CoV-2, the agent responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, and a seasonal human ß-coronavirus HCoV-OC43, can be suppressed by depletion of METTL3 or cytoplasmic m6A reader proteins YTHDF1 and YTHDF3 and by a highly specific small molecule METTL3 inhibitor. Reduction of infectious titer correlates with decreased synthesis of viral RNAs and the essential nucleocapsid (N) protein. Sites of m6A modification on genomic and subgenomic RNAs of both viruses were mapped by methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (meRIP-seq). Levels of host factors involved in m6A installation, removal, and recognition were unchanged by HCoV-OC43 infection; however, nuclear localization of METTL3 and cytoplasmic m6A readers YTHDF1 and YTHDF2 increased. This establishes that coronavirus RNAs are m6A-modified and host m6A pathway components control ß-coronavirus replication. Moreover, it illustrates the therapeutic potential of targeting the m6A pathway to restrict coronavirus reproduction.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/genetics , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Nucleocapsid Proteins , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
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