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1.
Nurs Womens Health ; 24(5): 309-310, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386402

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic may have many of us feeling distraught, but there are still reasons to be hopeful about the future of health care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
3.
Rev. baiana enferm ; 34: e37097, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1328338

ABSTRACT

Objetivo relatar a experiência do uso de estratégia musical para cuidar de discentes de Enfermagem no enfrentamento da Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método trata-se de relato de experiência da construção de um vídeo musical, envolvendo 32 enfermeiros, docentes do curso de graduação em Enfermagem de uma Universidade pública do Sul do Brasil. Resultados o vídeo musical foi estruturado para que pudesse refletir a relevância dos discentes no cotidiano da Universidade. A música balizou os sentimentos que são necessários externalizar nesse período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostrou as mudanças abruptas relativas ao vivido. Conclusão a estratégia mostrou-se promotora de saúde e articuladora entre os docentes e discentes, apontando novas perspectivas de cuidado que ultrapassam as barreiras da presencialidade, vislumbrando o uso das tecnologias em prol da ampliação dos horizontes para o cuidado, em tempos de distanciamento social e quarentena.


Objetivo informar la experiencia del uso de la estrategia musical para el cuidado de los estudiantes de enfermería en el enfrentamiento de la Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método este es un informe de experiencia de la construcción de un video musical, en el que participan 32 enfermeras, docentes del curso de graduación en Enfermería de una Universidad Pública en el Sur de Brasil. Resultados el vídeo musical se estructuró para que pudiera reflejar la relevancia de los estudiantes en la vida cotidiana de la Universidad. La música sacudió los sentimientos que se necesitan externalización en este período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostró los cambios abruptos relacionados con el vivido. Conclusión la estrategia resultó ser promotora y articuladora de la salud entre docentes y estudiantes, señalando nuevas perspectivas de atención que superan las barreras del presencial, vislumbrando el uso de tecnologías en favor de ampliar los horizontes para el cuidado, en tiempos de distanciamiento social y cuarentena.


Objetivo relatar a experiência do uso de estratégia musical para cuidar de discentes de Enfermagem no enfrentamento da Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Método trata-se de relato de experiência da construção de um vídeo musical, envolvendo 32 enfermeiros, docentes do curso de graduação em Enfermagem de uma Universidade pública do Sul do Brasil. Resultados o vídeo musical foi estruturado para que pudesse refletir a relevância dos discentes no cotidiano da Universidade. A música balizou os sentimentos que são necessários externalizar nesse período de pandemia, que ocasionalmente mostrou as mudanças abruptas relativas ao vivido. Conclusão a estratégia mostrou-se promotora de saúde e articuladora entre os docentes e discentes, apontando novas perspectivas de cuidado que ultrapassam as barreiras da presencialidade, vislumbrando o uso das tecnologias em prol da ampliação dos horizontes para o cuidado, em tempos de distanciamento social e quarentena.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Students, Nursing/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Music Therapy , Video Recording , Health Promotion
4.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 67(3): 111-119, 2020 Jun.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231566

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic continues to have a global impact. This article describes the author's experience providing nursing care to a female patient who was diagnosed with COVID-19 after returning to Taiwan from overseas. During the patient's period of isolation (February 5th to February 29th, 2020), the author used Roy's adaptation model to perform first-level holistic physical, psychological, and social nursing assessments and collected health-problem information using face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, and observations via a remote monitoring system. A second level of assessment confirmed that the problems faced by the patient included (1) existing infections related to COVID-19 and (2) anxiety related to uncertainties about disease prognosis, forgiveness from the family, and potential violations of personal privacy by the media. Due to the special nature of the isolation ward, the author used a remote physiological monitoring system to monitor the vital signs, fever, and shortness of breath status of the patient to quickly decrease her physical discomfort and to improve her self-care ability during hospitalization. Environmental cleanliness was strictly maintained to reduce the risk of cross-infection and ensure patient safety. To alleviate patient anxiety, the author established a good therapeutic interpersonal relationship with the patient by making 10-60 minutes of caring calls to her each day, by providing individual care measures, and by using the Internet to play audio and video to teach mindfulness meditation. Caring for COVID-19 cases is a completely new experience. The author hopes that this experience may be used as a reference for caregivers.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Female , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(10): 783-787, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105012

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe nurses' mental health status during the Covid-19 outbreak and to explore the factors that might accentuate the negative consequences on their mental health. METHODS: We conducted an online survey to evaluate demographic variables, working conditions, family dynamics, and mental health variables in nurses working in healthcare settings, in Portugal, during the Covid-19 outbreak. RESULTS: Portuguese nurses presented higher depression, anxiety and stress levels, when compared to the Portuguese general population, during the outbreak. Overall, nurses who did not consider the quantity and quality of personal protective equipment as adequate presented significantly higher levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that nurses' mental health status seems to be particularly affected by the Covid-19 outbreak and that some modifiable elements might accentuate the impacts on their mental health.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/physiopathology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Portugal , Prevalence , Sex Factors
10.
J Nurs Adm ; 50(11): 598-604, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066477

ABSTRACT

Congregate settings such as psychiatric units have an increased risk of disease transmission because of the milieu setting and the inability to isolate patients. Interventions to prevent infection and cross-contamination are discussed including monitoring of patient temperatures, personal protective equipment, remote care, monitoring of human resources, and reinforcement of infection prevention strategies. We discuss the effectiveness of those interventions and the lessons learned, including implications for psychiatric clinical care, during future pandemics or a next wave of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Cross Infection/nursing , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Infection Control/methods , Mental Disorders/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
11.
Inquiry ; 57: 46958020957114, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999403

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus pneumonia broke out and gradually developed into a global public health problem. Health care workers, especially nurses, suffered from great occupational pressure and psychological distress during the outbreak of infectious diseases. We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate the psychological status and self-efficacy of nurses in public hospital during COVID-19 outbreak between 16th and 25th February 2020. A total of 223 nurses participated in this study. The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms was 40.8% (CI 95%: 34.4%-47.2%) and 26.4% (CI 95%: 20.6%-42.2%), respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of anxiety symptoms among demographic variables. There was significant differences in the prevalence of depression symptoms according to professional titles (P = .020). The mean score of self-efficacy was 25.90 ± 7.55. The self-efficacy was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = -0.161, P < .05). The psychological status of nurses in public hospital during COVID-19 outbreak needs our attention. Improving nurses' self-efficacy in dealing with emerging infectious diseases may be helpful to their psychology.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 67(6): 104-110, 2020 Dec.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-994104

ABSTRACT

The author's experience caring for a patient with COVID-19 whose condition deteriorated rapidly into a critical illness in the negative pressure room of the intensive care unit is described in this article. The onset of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome led this patient to receive endotracheal intubation with mechanical ventilation and subsequent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for life support. He was isolated in the negative air pressure room in the intensive care unit for infection control for this emerging respiratory infectious disease. This patient was also confronted with emotional pressures arising from the general uncertainty regarding the progress of this novel disease and from being isolated from the outside world. The care period was from April 5th to May 12th, 2020. The data was collected through direct care, written conversations, physical communication, observation, medical record reviews, diagnosis reports, and nursing assessments of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distress. The health problems of this patient were identified as gas exchange disorder, infection, anxiety, and other problems. Our chest physiotherapy team comprised nurses, physicians, and respiratory therapists. After administering individualized treatments, including monitoring vital signs and installing an external life support system, the lung consolidation and lung collapse problems of the patient improved, allowing the ventilator to be removed. To address the patient's psychological problems, we used a humanoid diagram and whiteboard drawing as communication tools to explain to the patient the reasons for and functions of the different tubes on his body to reduce his anxiety and maintain the safe use of these tubes. Moreover, bedside care was replaced by mobile phone video and phone calls, allowing the patient to communicate with family members, which reduced his isolation-related anxiety and enhanced his compliance with treatment and care protocols. This experience supports the benefit of installing two-way video devices and viewing monitors in negative pressure rooms in the ICU to facilitate effective communications between patients, patient family members, and the medical team to reduce patient-perceived anxiety and social isolation. This case report provides a reference demonstrating a patient-centered caring model for treating COVID-19 patients in the ICU.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 67(6): 97-103, 2020 Dec.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-994103

ABSTRACT

The focus of this article is on a male patient with hearing loss who was diagnosed with COVID-19 after returning to Taiwan from overseas. Due to the severe pneumonia infiltration, the patient received the clinical-trial treatment Remdesivir. In addition to facing the isolation and new-drug-related anxieties of the patient, the medical team faced difficulties in communicating effectively with the patient and in helping him through the isolation period. During the period of hospitalization (March 14th to April 13th, 2020), the author used Roy's adaptation model to perform a nursing assessment, which confirmed that the patient faced the following problems: (1) ineffective breathing pattern related to COVID-19, (2) impaired verbal communication related to hearing impairment, and (3) social isolation related to the isolation experience and the communication barrier with healthcare workers. During the nursing care process, the author helped the patient receive the antiviral treatment and taught him how to do diaphragmatic breathing in a comfortable, recumbent position to improve his breathing pattern. To reduce the difficulty of communication, the author made a pile of cards with common care-related words, provided pen and paper to write, and used a mobile-phone-based social-networking application to communicate with the patient. The author used writing to communicate with the patient and learned some simple signs from him to enable interaction. Moreover, the intervention helped him adapt to the isolation and treatment protocols to reach holistic nursing care. Based on this experience, the author suggests that hospitals cooperate with sign language organizations to teach healthcare workers simple communication skills, including sign language and cards to provide more complete care for patients with hearing loss during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Hearing Loss , Patient-Centered Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Taiwan , Treatment Outcome
14.
Pflege ; 33(4): 247-255, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982157

ABSTRACT

Between dream and distress - Setting up and running a cohort ward for COVID-19 Patients at an acute hospital - A case study Abstract. Background: In the context of the pandemic, hospitals must be able to care for COVID-19 patients within a very short timeframe. OBJECTIVE: Description of the setting up of a cohort ward for patients with COVID-19 on a surgical ward including the development of the nursing team. METHODS: The intrinsic retrospective case study describes the situation, identifies special phenomena in a reflective manner and links them to existing knowledge. Data were anecdotal, routine data were collected in the context of nursing practice development. RESULTS: Setting up the cohort ward in a Swiss hospital consisted of structural and technical planning, infection control measures, the establishment of interprofessional structures, and internal communication. During the four-week operation, 71 patients were treated. The use of practice development methodology initiated a cultural change. The reflection describes a field of tension between "dream and distress": As a dream, the lived experience of optimal care, with well-functioning processes, sufficient material, sufficient personnel and a very good interprofessional cooperation was evaluated. Distress in the form of high infection rates as well as psychological and physical stress did not occur. After the cohort ward was closed, there was a risk working back in normal operations based on existing economical and organizational conditions, with the knowledge that a different cooperation and organization is possible. CONCLUSIONS: Positive experiences from the "crisis mode" should be used to further develop essential operations during normal times.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Retrospective Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology
15.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(11): 526-530, 2020 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916555

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by Covid-19 has long term ramifications for many, especially those patients who have experienced an intensive care unit (ICU) admission including ventilation and sedation. This paper will explore aspects of care delivery in the ICU regarding the current pandemic and the impact of such on the mental health of some of these patients. Post discharge, patients will be returning to a very different community incorporating social distancing, and in some cases, social isolation and/or shielding. Many may experience a multitude of physical and mental health complications which can ultimately impact upon each other, therefore a bio-psycho-pharmaco-social approach to discharge, case management, risk assessment and positive behavioural support planning is recommended.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Critical Care/psychology , Deep Sedation/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Respiration, Artificial/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Palliat Nurs ; 26(7): 336-340, 2020 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895729

ABSTRACT

This narrative describes the experiences of an inner city respiratory unit that was transformed to treat COVID-19 patients with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation who were not scheduled for any further escalation in treatment. The high mortality rate and unconventional way of dying led to the creation of local guidance for removing assisted ventilation when the treatment ceased to be effective. We reflect on the specific challenges that caring for these patients holistically has presented and how we have learnt to deliver good palliative care in a unique set of circumstances. We also consider the impact of the pandemic on our team and how the development of a multidisciplinary support system has improved team dynamics and ultimately patient care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Masks , Palliative Care , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
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