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2.
Breastfeed Med ; 15(8): 488-491, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628894

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited data are available on the perinatal and postnatal transmission of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) recommended breastfeeding with necessary precautions to mothers with COVID-19. Case Presentation: A 20-year-old pregnant woman with no symptoms of COVID-19 presented to the hospital for delivery at 39 weeks of gestation. She was tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) because her father had been diagnosed with COVID-19. A nasopharyngeal swab RT-PCR test was positive for SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, the baby and the mother were cared for separately after delivery. Breast milk obtained after first lactation was tested by real-time RT-PCR and was positive for SARS-CoV-2. Conclusions: In this article, we aimed to report the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in breast milk. Although further studies are needed, this situation may have an impact on breastfeeding recommendations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Breast Feeding , Coronavirus Infections , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Milk, Human/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases/therapy , Breast Feeding/adverse effects , Breast Feeding/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery, Obstetric , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology
3.
Virol Sin ; 35(3): 290-304, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618224

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has already affected a large population of the world. SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the same family of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). COVID-19 has a complex pathology involving severe acute respiratory infection, hyper-immune response, and coagulopathy. At present, there is no therapeutic drug or vaccine approved for the disease. There is an urgent need for an ideal animal model that can reflect clinical symptoms and underlying etiopathogenesis similar to COVID-19 patients which can be further used for evaluation of underlying mechanisms, potential vaccines, and therapeutic strategies. The current review provides a paramount insight into the available animal models of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV for the management of the diseases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS Virus , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Camelids, New World , Camelus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Swine
4.
Age Ageing ; 49(5): 696-700, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759920

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the response to the pandemic are combining to produce a tidal wave of need for rehabilitation. Rehabilitation will be needed for survivors of COVID-19, many of whom are older, with underlying health problems. In addition, rehabilitation will be needed for those who have become deconditioned as a result of movement restrictions, social isolation, and inability to access healthcare for pre-existing or new non-COVID-19 illnesses. Delivering rehabilitation in the same way as before the pandemic will not be practical, nor will this approach meet the likely scale of need for rehabilitation. This commentary reviews the likely rehabilitation needs of older people both with and without COVID-19 and discusses how strategies to deliver effective rehabilitation at scale can be designed and implemented in a world living with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Aging , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Rehabilitation , Aged , Aging/physiology , Aging/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/rehabilitation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Forecasting , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Physical Functional Performance , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/organization & administration , Rehabilitation/trends
6.
Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo ; 62: e65, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750871

ABSTRACT

This narrative review summarizes the main aspects underlying the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, its epidemiology, pathophysiology, pointing to differences of SARS-CoV-2 main receptors ACE2, in terms of expression and the amount of soluble ACE2 in the circulation of children, men and women, and also in those with risk factors such as the smokers and pregnant women or presenting with comorbidities (diabetes, obesity, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases, renal and CNS pre-existing diseases). Clinical manifestations in adults and children were also described, emphasizing the particularities already seen in children, regarding signs, symptoms, viral excretion time and the involvement of all organs and systems. The COVID-19 in the pediatric population was divided into two sections: one dedicated to previously healthy children and adolescents with COVID-19, and the other to those who live with comorbidities and acquired COVID-19. A few paragraphs were reserved to the recently described severe multisystemic inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19 (MIS-C) that shares certain characteristics with Kawasaki disease. Some studies on the infection in pregnant and postpartum women, as well as neonates were shown. This review has also covered the laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19, passing through the imaging diagnosis made by the chest tomography revealing ground glass patching opacities, and results of non-specific exams such as the total blood with lymphopenia, the coagulation tests with increased prothrombin times, as well as marked increments of the D-dimer, troponin and proinflammatory cytokines. In the section devoted to the specific laboratory diagnosis of COVID-19, the most used RT-PCR protocols were described and some studies on the serological diagnosis with IgA, IgM and IgG detection were detailed, including the use of rapid immunochromatographic assays and discussing the ideal period after the onset of symptoms to perform each type of test. In the end, the management of pediatric patients with COVID-19 based mainly on supportive measures has been briefly commented.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Child , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(8): e19642, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly in Wuhan and worldwide. However, previous studies on pregnant patients were limited. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of pregnant and nonpregnant women with COVID-19. METHODS: This study retrospectively collected epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, imaging, management, and outcome data of 43 childbearing-age women patients (including 17 pregnant and 26 nonpregnant patients) who presented with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China from January 19 to March 2, 2020. Clinical outcomes were followed up to March 28, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 43 childbearing-age women in this study, none developed a severe adverse illness or died. The median ages of pregnant and nonpregnant women were 33.0 and 33.5 years, respectively. Pregnant women had a markedly higher proportion of history exposure to hospitals within 2 weeks before onset compared to nonpregnant women (9/17, 53% vs 5/26, 19%, P=.02) and a lower proportion of other family members affected (4/17, 24% vs 19/26, 73%, P=.004). Fever (8/17, 47% vs 18/26, 69%) and cough (9/17, 53% vs 12/26, 46%) were common onsets of symptoms for the two groups. Abdominal pain (n=4, 24%), vaginal bleeding (n=1, 6%), reduced fetal movement (n=1, 6%), and increased fetal movement (n=2, 13%) were observed at onset in the 17 pregnant patients. Higher neutrophil and lower lymphocyte percent were observed in the pregnant group compared to the nonpregnant group (79% vs 56%, P<.001; 15% vs 33%, P<.001, respectively). In both groups, we observed an elevated concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Concentrations of alkaline phosphatase and D-dimer in the pregnant group were significantly higher than those of the nonpregnant group (119.0 vs 48.0 U/L, P<.001; 2.1 vs 0.3µg/mL, P<.001, respectively). Both pregnant (4/10, 40%) and nonpregnant (8/15, 53%) women tested positive for influenza A virus. A majority of pregnant and nonpregnant groups received antiviral (13/17, 76% vs 25/26, 96%) and antibiotic (13/17, 76% vs 23/26, 88%) therapy. Additionally, both pregnant (2/11, 18%) and nonpregnant (2/19, 11%) recovered women redetected positive for SARS-CoV-2 after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiology and clinical and laboratory features of pregnant women with COVID-19 were diverse and atypical, which increased the difficulty of diagnosis. Most pregnant women with COVID-19 were mild and moderate, and rarely developed severe pneumonia or severe adverse outcomes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adult , China , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(8): e21609, 2020 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750813

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has presented unique challenges for people with diabetes, in addition to their high-risk stratification for infection. Supporting people with diabetes to self-care has been critical to reduce their risk of severe infection. This global pandemic has presented an opportunity to digitalize diabetes care and rapidly implement virtual diabetes clinics, with the aim of optimizing diabetes management and well-being, while keeping patients safe. We performed a rapid review of the literature to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of virtual clinics in diabetes care before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and have combined these findings with our own reflections in practice. We identified examples demonstrating safety and feasibility of virtual diabetes clinics, which aligns with our own clinical experience during the pandemic. The advantages of virtual clinics include reduced treatment burden, improved therapeutic alliances, societal and psychological benefits, and in our experience, innovative solutions to overcome the challenges presented by the transition from in-person to virtual care. We have provided three infographics to illustrate lessons learned and key recommendations, including steps to establish a virtual diabetes clinic, a checklist guide for health care professionals conducting virtual clinics, and a patient guide for making the most out of the virtual clinic. It is important to continue adapting to this pandemic and to make technology a sustainable option for the future of diabetes care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Pandemics , United Kingdom
9.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 37(2): 302-311, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-749299

ABSTRACT

During the first weeks of 2020, cases of SARS-CoV-2 began to be reported outside of China, with a rapid increase in cases and deaths worldwide. SARS-CoV-2 is a positive single-stranded RNA virus, encased in a lipid bilayer derived from the host cell membrane and consists of four structural proteins (S, M, E and N), plus a haemagglutinin-sterase. The binding of the S protein to the ECA2 receptor allows the entry of the virus into the host cell and is a potential therapeutic target. 81% of patients develop mild symptoms, 14% have severe symptoms and 5% require intensive care management. Fever is the most frequent symptom, followed by cough and dyspnea. Most patients do not present leukocytosis, but they do present lymphopenia with sputum cultures that do not show other pathogens. In lung biopsies of severe patients, the most noticeable finding is diffuse alveolar damage. Radiologically, ground glass and alveolar patterns are observed; the lesions being predominantly basal, subpleural, and posterior, with a multifocal peripheral distribution, more affecting the right lower lobe. There is a marked inflammatory response, up to the cytokine storm, in which anti-inflammatory treatment with pulse therapy with methylprednisolone would be indicated. Although there are no large-scale studies regarding the use of chloroquine / hydroxychloroquine, due to the global situation, its use has been authorized for its anti-SARS-CoV-2 and anti-inflammatory effect, which can be potentiated with the use of azithromycin.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Inflammation/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Inflammation/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology
10.
Lipids Health Dis ; 19(1): 204, 2020 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study is to describe the blood lipid levels of patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to analyze the correlation between blood lipid levels and the prognosis of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In the clinical retrospective analysis, a total of 228 adults infected with COVID-19 were enrolled between January 17, 2020 and March 14, 2020, in Changsha, China. One thousand one hundred and forty healthy participants with matched age and gender were used as control. Median with interquartile range and Mann-Whitney test were adopted to describe and analyze clinical data. The Kaplan-Meier (KM) curve and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze the correlation between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and the severity of COVID-19. RESULTS: Compared with control, COVID-19 patients showed significantly lower levels of total cholesterol (TC) [median, 3.76 vs 4.65 mmol/L, P = 0.031], triglyceride [median, 1.08 vs 1.21 mmol/L, P <  0.001], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) [median, 2.63 vs 2.83 mmol/L, P <  0.001], and HDL-C [median, 0.78 vs 1.37 mmol/L, P <  0.001], while compared with non-severe patients, severe COVID-19 patients only presented lower levels of HDL-C [median, 0.69 vs 0.79 mmol/L, P = 0.032]. In comparison with patients with high HDL-C, patients with low HDL-C showed a higher proportion of male (69.57% vs 45.60%, P = 0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (median, 27.83 vs 12.56 mg/L, P <  0.001) and higher proportion of severe events (36.96% vs 14.84%, P = 0.001). Moreover, patients with low HDL-C at admission showed a higher risk of developing severe events compared with those with high HDL-C (Log Rank P = 0.009). After adjusting for age, gender and underlying diseases, they still had elevated possibility of developing severe cases than those with high HDL-C (HR 2.827, 95% CI 1.190-6.714, P = 0.019). CONCLUSIONS: HDL-C level was lower in COVID-19 adult patients, and low HDL-C in COVID-19 patients was correlated with a higher risk of developing severe events.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adult , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , China , Cholesterol/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Triglycerides/blood
12.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 536-541, 2020 May 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745337

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has spread rapidly in China and many other countries. The rapid increase in the number of cases has caused widespread panic among people and has become the main public health problem in the world. Severe patients often have difficult breathing and/or hypoxemia after 1 week of onset. A few critically ill patients may not only rapidly develop into acute respiratory distress syndrome, but also may cause coagulopathy, as well as multiple organs failure (such as heart, liver and kidney) or even death. This article is to analyze the predictive role of clinical features in patients with COVID-19 for severe disease, so as to help doctor monitor the severity-related features, restrain the disease progress, and provide a reference for improvement of medical treatment. METHODS: The clinical data of 208 patients with COVID-19 who were isolated and treated in Changsha Public Health Treatment Center from January 17, 2020 to March 14, 2020 were collected. All patients were the mild and ordinary adult patients on admission, including 105 males and 103 females from 19 to 84 (median age 44) years old. According to the "Program for the diagnosis and treatment of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infected pneumonia (Trial version 7)" issued by the General Office of National Health Committee and Office of State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine as the diagnostic and typing criteria. According to progression from mild to severe disease during hospitalization, the patients were divided into a mild group (n=183) and a severe transformation group (n=25). The clinical features such as age, underlying disease, blood routine, coagulation function, blood biochemistry, oxygenation index, and so on were analyzed. Among them, laboratory tests included white blood cell (WBC), lymphocytes (LYM), neutrophil (NEU), hemoglobin (Hb), platelet (PLT), prothrombin time (PT), plasma fibrinogen (Fib), activated partial prothrombin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), D-dimer, total bilirubin (TBIL), albumin (ALB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), and oxygen partial pressure in arterial blood. Partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fractional concentration of inspiratory oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) was calculated. The variables with statistical significance were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients in the severe transformation group had more combined underlying diseases than those in the mild group (P<0.05). From the perspective of disease distribution, patients in the severe transformation group had more combined hypertension (P<0.05). In the severe transformation group, PT was significantly longer, the levels of Fib, ALT, AST, CK, LDH, and CRP were significantly higher than those in the mild group (P<0.05 or P<0.001), while LYM, ALB, and PaO2/FiO2 were significantly lower than those in the mild group (P<0.05 or P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis was performed on clinical features with statistically significant differences. Combined with hypertension, LYM, PT, Fib, ALB, ALT, AST, CK, LDH, and CRP as independent variables, and having severe disease or not was the dependent variable. The results show that combined hypertension, decreased LYM, longer PT, and increased CK level were independent risk factors that affected the severity of COVID-19 (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The patients with mild COVID-19 who are apt to develop severe diseases may be related to combined hypertension, decreased LYM, and longer PT, and increased CK level. For the mild patients with these clinical features, early intervention may effectively prevent the progression to severe diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
13.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 542-548, 2020 May 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745328

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for severe events of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in elderly patients. METHODS: Retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of all elderly COVID- 19 patients treated in Changsha Public Health Treatment Center from January 17, 2020 to March 15, 2020, which included basic diseases, symptoms, test results, and other clinical characteristics, and prognostic indicators such as severity of illness, length of hospital stay, virus shedding time and mortality rate. The differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic indicators between elderly, middle-aged, and young COVID-19 patients were also analyzed. Logistic regression model was used to conduct univariate and multivariate analysis of risk factors for developing severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients; receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the prediction efficacy. RESULTS: Of the 230 COVID-19 adult patients, 34 were young patients (14.8%), 136 were middle-aged patients (59.1%), and 60 were elderly (26.1%). Among the 60 elderly patients, 23 were male (38.3%) and 37 were female (61.7%), with a medium age of 66 years old. Common symptoms were fever (66.7%), cough (50.0%), and fatigue (41.7%). C reactive protein (CRP) was increased significantly. The proportion of severe cases was 31.7%, and mortality was 1.7%. The median length of hospitalization and median virus shedding time were 18.5 days and 21 days, respectively. Compared with the young and the middle-aged patients, the elderly had a higher proportion of hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, more common shortness of breath, higher proportions of pneumonia and severe cases (all P<0.05), and the decreased lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage (both P<0.05), as well as higher CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels (both P<0.05). Compared with non-severe cases, severe elderly patients demonstrated higher CRP and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels (all P<0.05), the reduced lymphocyte count (P<0.05), and the prolonged length of hospitalization and virus shedding duration (both P<0.05). Univariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the lymphocytes proportion, CRP and AST levels were significantly correlated with the risk for developing severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression found that severe events in elderly patients with COVID-19 were significantly correlated with CRP level (OR=1.041, P=0.013). ROC curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (AUC) for CRP to diagnose severe events in elderly COVID 19 patients was 0.851. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of severe cases in elderly COVID-19 patients is higher than that in young and middle-aged patients. CRP level has a good predictive value for the possibility of severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
14.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 560-564, 2020 May 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical characteristics of fecal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleic acid-positive in patients with coronavirus dasease 2019 (COVID-19) and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of this disease. METHODS: The clinical data of 16 patients with fecal SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid positive, who hospitalized in the North Branch of the First Hospital of Changsha (Changsha Public Health Rescue Center) from January to February 2020, were retrospectively analyzed. Their clinical manifestations, laboratory data and imaging data were summarized. RESULTS: Among the 16 patients, there were 9 males (56.25%) and 7 females (43.75%), the ratio of males to females was 1∶1.29. The age of onset was (43.3±14.6) years. There were 15 patients with contact history of Wuhan, 1 patient with contact history of local patient.Twelve patients were common type (75%), and 4 patients were severe type (25%). Clinical symptoms included fever in 14 patients (87.5%), cough in 12 patients (75%), shortness of breath in 5 patients (31.25%), pharyngalgia in 10 patients (62.5%), fatigue in 7 patients (43.75%), and diarrhea in 4 patients (25%). There were 14 patients (87.5%) with normal or decreased white blood cell count, 11 patients (68.75%) with decreased lymphocyte count, 15 patients (93.75%) with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, 13 patients (81.25%) with increased hypersensitivity C-reactive protein, 5 patients (31.25%) with increased procalcitonin, and 8 patients (50%) with increased serum ferritin in peripheral blood, and stool routine was basically normal. Compared with the common type, there was significant difference in the white blood cell and lymphocyte counts in the severe type (P<0.01); the infection indicators, such as hypersensitivity C-reactive protein and serum ferritin, were significantly increased, with significant difference (all P<0.01); but the procalcitonin and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was not significantly different (both P>0.05). Chest CT mainly showed patchy shadows and interstitial changes. According to imaging examination, 4 patients (25%) showed unilateral pneumonia and 12 patients (75%) showed bilateral pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: The patients have the clinical symptoms of COVID-19, but gastrointestinal symptoms (such as diarrhea) are more common, and the changes of white blood cell count, lymphocyte count, hypersensitivity C-reactive protein, ferritin are more obvious in severe patients.The positivity of fecal nucleic acid suggests the possibility of digestive tract transmission of SARS-CoV-2, and fecal nucleic acid testing can be used as a routine testing method in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , China , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diarrhea/virology , Feces/virology , Female , Ferritins/analysis , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies
15.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(7): 790-796, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical characteristics of 71 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The general data, epidemiological data, laboratory tests, imaging examinations, and treatment of 71 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Sixth People's Hospital of Zhengzhou from January 19, 2020 to March 3, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 71 COVID-19 patients, the ages were 4-84 (41.29±15.21) years, 38 (53.5%) patients were male, 33 (46.5%) were female, and 52 (73.2%) were in 22 clusters. The main clinical manifestations were fever (78.9%), cough (64.8%), and sputum (38.0%). The fever was mainly low and moderate, with 49 patients (69.0%) at 37.3-39.0 ℃. Most of the leukocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were normal, accounting for 47 (66.2%), 51 (71.8%), and 51 (71.8%) patients, respectively; a few of them were decreased, accounting for 21 (29.6%), 16 (22.5%), and 20 (28.2%) patients, respectively. There were 38 (53.5%) and 31 (43.7%) patients with the decreased CD4+ and CD8+ T cell counts, respectively. There were 41 (57.7%), 38 (53.5%), 32 (45.1%), 26(36.6%), 22 (31.0%), 20 (28.2%), 14 (19.7%), 14 (19.7%), and 9 (12.7%) patients with the increased levels of C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, procalcitonin, fibrinogen,interleukin 6, lactate dehydrogenase,D-dimer,alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. Of the 71 patients, the lung was involved in 60 (84.5%) patients, the double lung was involved in 47 (66.2%) patients, and the single lung was involved in 13 (18.3%) patients. The course of the disease was long, and the time from symptom onset to the second severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleic acid negative transformation was (17.22±6.34) days.There were no significant differences in the incubation period (t=-0.453, P>0.05), the complicates (χ2=0.042, P>0.05), and the time from symptom onset to diagnosis (t=-1.330, P>0.05) in patients between the non-severe group and the severe group. The onset age, gender, SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid negative time, lymphocyte count, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, calcium ion, CD4+ T cell count, CD8+ T cell count, calcitonin, procalcitonin, and troponin were significantly different between the severe group and the non-severe group (all P<0.05). Among the 71 patients, 4 (5.6%) patients were mild, 59 (83.1%) were normal, and 8 (11.3%) were severe or critical. CONCLUSIONS: The aggregation phenomenon of COVID-19 is obvious. Fever and cough are the main clinical manifestations. White blood cells, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the most patients in the early onset are normal. Most COVID-19 patients are light and ordinary type, with good prognosis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Cough/virology , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
16.
World J Gastroenterol ; 26(31): 4694-4702, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a worldwide pandemic. We investigated the clinical characteristics and risk factors for liver injury in COVID-19 patients in Wuhan by retrospectively analyzing the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory data for 218 COVID-19 patients and identifying the risk factors for liver injury by multivariate analysis. AIM: To investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for liver injury in COVID-19 patients in Wuhan. METHODS: The 218 patients included 94 males (43.1%), aged 22 to 94 (50.1 ± 18.4) years. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were present in 42 (53.2%) and 36 (45.6%) cases, respectively, and 79 (36.2%) patients had abnormally elevated transaminase levels at admission. Patients with liver injury were older than those with normal liver function by a median of 12 years, with a significantly higher frequency of males (68.4% vs 28.8%, P < 0.001) and more coexisting illnesses (48.1% vs 27.3%, P = 0.002). Significantly more patients had fever and shortness of breath (87.3% vs 69.8% and 29.1% vs 14.4%, respectively) in the liver injury group. Only 12 (15.2%) patients had elevated total bilirubin. ALT and AST levels were mildly elevated [1-3 × upper limit of normal (ULN)] in 86.1% and 92.9% of cases, respectively. Only two (2.5%) patients had an ALT or AST level > 5 × ULN. Elevated γ-glutamyl transpeptidase was present in 45 (57.0%) patients, and 86.7% of these had a γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase level < 135 U/L (3 × ULN). Serum alkaline phosphatase levels were almost normal in all patients. Patients with severe liver injury had a significantly higher frequency of abnormal transaminases than non-severe patients, but only one case had very high levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex, high D-dimer level, and high neutrophil percentage were linked to a higher risk of liver injury. The early stage of COVID-19 may be associated with mildly elevated aminotransferase levels in patients in Wuhan. Male sex and high D-dimer level and neutrophil percentage may be important predictors of liver injury in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Male sex and high D-dimer level and neutrophil percentage may be important predictors of liver injury in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Liver Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
17.
World J Gastroenterol ; 26(31): 4579-4588, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745191

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a newly identified ß-coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged as a dire health problem, causing a massive crisis for global health. Primary method of transmission was firstly thought to be animal to human transmission. However, it has been observed that the virus is transmitted from human to human via respiratory droplets. Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 ribonucleic acid (RNA) has been isolated from patient stools, suggesting a possible gastrointestinal (GI) involvement. Most commonly reported clinical manifestations are fever, fatigue and dry cough. Interestingly, a small percentage of patients experience GI symptoms with the most common being anorexia, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. The presence of viral RNA in stools is also common and fecal tests can be positive even after negative respiratory samples. The exact incidence of digestive symptoms is a matter of debate. The distribution of Angiotensin converting enzyme type 2 receptors in multiple organs in the body provides a possible explanation for the digestive symptoms' mechanism. Cases with solely GI symptoms have been reported in both adults and children. Viral RNA has also been detected in stool and blood samples, indicating the possibility of liver damage, which has been reported in COVID-19 patients. The presence of chronic liver disease appears to be a risk factor for severe complications and a poorer prognosis, however data from these cases is lacking. The aim of this review is firstly, to briefly update what is known about the origin and the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, but mainly to focus on the manifestations of the GI tract and their pathophysiological background, so that physicians on the one hand, not to underestimate or disregard digestive symptoms due to the small number of patients exhibiting exclusively this symptomatology and on the other, to have SARS-CoV-2 on their mind when the "gastroenteritis" type symptoms predominate.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Liver Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adult , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology , Global Health , Humans , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Factors
18.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 20(1): 511, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744979

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that pregnant women and their fetuses may be particularly at risk for poor outcomes due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. From the few case series that are available in the literature, women with high risk pregnancies have been associated with higher morbidity. It has been suggested that pregnancy induced immune responses and cardio-vascular changes can exaggerate the course of the COVID-19 infection. CASE PRESENTATION: A 26-year old Somalian woman (G2P1) presented with a nine-day history of shortness of breath, dry cough, myalgia, nausea, abdominal pain and fever. A nasopharyngeal swab returned positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Her condition rapidly worsened leading to severe liver and coagulation impairment. An emergency Caesarean section was performed at gestational week 32 + 6 after which the patient made a rapid recovery. Severe COVID-19 promptly improved by the termination of the pregnancy or atypical HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes and Low Platelet Count) exacerbated by concomitant COVID-19 infection could not be ruled out. There was no evidence of vertical transmission. CONCLUSIONS: This case adds to the growing body of evidence which raises concerns about the possible negative maternal outcomes of COVID-19 infection during pregnancy and advocates for pregnant women to be recognized as a vulnerable group during the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Cesarean Section , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Liver Diseases/blood , Obesity, Maternal , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Adult , Antithrombin III/metabolism , Apgar Score , Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , HELLP Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Liver Diseases/etiology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Pandemics , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Sweden , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 647, 2020 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The family cluster is one of most important modes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission throughout China, and more details are needed about how family clusters cause the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). CASE PRESENTATION: We retrospectively reviewed 7 confirmed cases from one family cluster. Both clinical features and laboratory examination results were described. Patient 1 had been in close contact with someone who was later confirmed to have COVID-19 in Wuhan City before he returned back to his hometown. He had dinner with 6 other members in his family. All the persons developed COVID-19 successively except for one older woman who neither had dinner with them nor shared a sleeping room with her husband. Six patients had mild or moderate COVID-19 but one older man with underlying diseases progressed into the severe type. After general and symptomatic treatments, all the patients recovered. CONCLUSIONS: In a family cluster, having dinner together may be an important mode for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In this setting, most cases are mild with a favorable prognosis, while elderly patients with underlying diseases may progress into the severe type. For someone who has close contact with a confirmed case, 14-day isolation is necessary to contain virus transmission.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Family Health , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Child , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies
20.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 44(4): 545-549, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744895

ABSTRACT

It is important to reinforce physiology and pathophysiology concepts during clinical rotations, which traditionally occur after the foundational sciences in the US medical school system. We took an opportunistic approach when the COVID-19 pandemic forced our content into virtual delivery mode, as clinical medical education required a shift to nonpatient contact. We describe our experience in building a 2-wk course that consisted of online small groups during week 1 and panels and cases during week 2. The physiology content involved faculty-vetted resources, along with both discrete and open-ended focus questions for each learning objective. The course also included mechanical ventilation, and the physiologist utilized discussion points and developed a formative quiz to emphasize the physiology correlates, in addition to the very clinical aspects of mechanical ventilation. There were pathophysiology opportunities with pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and multiple-organ system dysfunction among the clinical correlates. Review and recall of the foundational sciences occurred, allowing links between the pre-clerkship and clerkship years that were previously undiscovered in our institution. This virtually delivered medical curriculum related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19 is timely, carries high student interest, and can benefit medical students and the communities they serve.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Lung/physiopathology , Physiology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Schools, Medical
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