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1.
J Dairy Sci ; 104(2): 2151-2163, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1031655

ABSTRACT

The objective of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the effect of bovine coronavirus (BCoV), bovine rotavirus (BRoV), and Cryptosporidiumparvum on dairy calf health and performance and to determine the prevalence of these pathogens. A total of 198 male dairy calves housed at a grain-fed veal facility were examined from June 11, 2018, to October 9, 2018. Calves were fed milk replacer twice daily and housed individually until weaning at 56 d. Once weaned, calves were moved into groups of 5 until they were moved to a finishing facility at 77 d. At the grain-fed veal facility, calves were scored for fecal consistency for the first 28 d and had fecal samples taken on arrival and at 7 and 14 d. Fecal samples were frozen and submitted to a commercial laboratory, where they were tested for BCoV, C.parvum, and 2 groups of BRoV: group A (BRoV A) and group B (BRoV B). Calves were weighed on arrival and at 14, 49, 56, and 77 d using a digital body scale. Treatments for disease and mortalities that occurred over the 77 d were also recorded. Statistical models, including Cox proportional hazards and repeated measures models, were built to determine the effect of infection with 1 of the pathogens. Over the 3 sampling points, 151 (85.8%), 178 (94.2%), 3 (1.5%), and 97 (57.4%) calves tested positive at least once for BCoV, BRoV A, BRoV B, and C.parvum, respectively. The source of the calves and the level of serum total protein measured on arrival were associated with testing positive for a pathogen. Calves that tested positive for C.parvum had an increased proportion of days with diarrhea and severe diarrhea; calves that tested positive for BCoV and BRoV A had an increased proportion of days with severe diarrhea. In addition, calves that tested positive for C.parvum had a higher hazard of being treated for respiratory disease. With respect to body weight, calves that had diarrhea or severe diarrhea had lower body weight at 49, 56, and 77 d. Specifically, calves that had an increased proportion of days with diarrhea showed a reduction in weight gain of up to 15 kg compared to calves without diarrhea. Calves that tested positive for C.parvum had a lower body weight at 49, 56, and 77 d; calves that tested positive for BCoV had a lower body weight at 56 and 77 d. This study demonstrates that the prevalence of BCoV, BRoV A, and C.parvum infection is high in this population of calves and has significant effects on the occurrence of diarrhea and body weight gain. Future studies should evaluate approaches for minimizing the effect of infection with these pathogens to improve the welfare, health, and productivity of dairy calves.


Subject(s)
Cattle Diseases/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus, Bovine , Cryptosporidiosis/physiopathology , Cryptosporidium parvum , Rotavirus Infections/veterinary , Animals , Cattle , Cattle Diseases/epidemiology , Cattle Diseases/parasitology , Cattle Diseases/virology , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cryptosporidiosis/parasitology , Diarrhea/parasitology , Diarrhea/veterinary , Diarrhea/virology , Feces/chemistry , Feces/parasitology , Feces/virology , Male , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Diseases/therapy , Respiratory Tract Diseases/veterinary , Rotavirus , Rotavirus Infections/epidemiology , Rotavirus Infections/physiopathology , Weight Gain
4.
Lung ; 198(5): 771-775, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-756086

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate whether sarcoidosis patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at risk for adverse disease outcomes. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted in five hospitals within the Mount Sinai Health System during March 1, 2020 to July 29, 2020. All patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were included in the study. We identified sarcoidosis patients who met diagnostic criteria for sarcoidosis according to accepted guidelines. An adverse disease outcome was defined as the presence of intubation and mechanical ventilation or in-hospital mortality. In sarcoidosis patients, we reported (when available) the results of pulmonary function testing measured within 3 years prior to the time of SARS­CoV­2 infection. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to generate an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) to evaluate sarcoidosis as a risk factor for an adverse outcome. The same model was used to analyze sarcoidosis patients with moderate and/or severe impairment in pulmonary function. RESULTS: The study included 7337 patients, 37 of whom (0.5%) had sarcoidosis. The crude rate of developing an adverse outcome was significantly higher in patients with moderately and/or severely impaired pulmonary function (9/14 vs. 3/23, p = 0.003). While the diagnosis of sarcoidosis was not independently associated with risk of an adverse event, (aOR 1.8, 95% CI 0.9-3.6), the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in patients with moderately and/or severely impaired pulmonary function was associated with an adverse outcome (aOR 7.8, 95% CI 2.4-25.8). CONCLUSION: Moderate or severe impairment in pulmonary function is associated with mortality in sarcoidosis patients infected with SARS­CoV­2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/physiopathology , United States/epidemiology
5.
Emerg Med J ; 37(9): 565-566, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024248

ABSTRACT

We report the experience of prone ventilation in selected patients treated with helmet non-invasive ventilation (NIV) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute respiratory failure in COVID-19 pneumonia. Preliminary results showed an improvement in the PaO2 value and PaO2/FiO2 ratio after 1 hour of prone ventilation. No variation of the lung ultrasound pattern before and after prone ventilation has been detected. At the time of writing, we attempted proning with helmet NIV CPAP in 10 patients. In 4 out of 10 patients, the attempt failed due to lack of compliance of the patient, scarce pain control even with ongoing treatment and refusal by the patient to prone positioning.


Subject(s)
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Oxygen Consumption , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Patient Positioning , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Treatment Outcome
6.
Nat Biotechnol ; 38(8): 970-979, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023942

ABSTRACT

To investigate the immune response and mechanisms associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we performed single-cell RNA sequencing on nasopharyngeal and bronchial samples from 19 clinically well-characterized patients with moderate or critical disease and from five healthy controls. We identified airway epithelial cell types and states vulnerable to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In patients with COVID-19, epithelial cells showed an average three-fold increase in expression of the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor ACE2, which correlated with interferon signals by immune cells. Compared to moderate cases, critical cases exhibited stronger interactions between epithelial and immune cells, as indicated by ligand-receptor expression profiles, and activated immune cells, including inflammatory macrophages expressing CCL2, CCL3, CCL20, CXCL1, CXCL3, CXCL10, IL8, IL1B and TNF. The transcriptional differences in critical cases compared to moderate cases likely contribute to clinical observations of heightened inflammatory tissue damage, lung injury and respiratory failure. Our data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of the CCR1 and/or CCR5 pathways might suppress immune hyperactivation in critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiratory System/pathology , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Adult , Aged , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , Cell Communication , Cell Differentiation , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Immune System/pathology , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory System/immunology , Respiratory System/virology , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Br J Pharmacol ; 177(21): 4990-4994, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007351

ABSTRACT

Severe pneumonia which shares several of the features of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Coronavirus disease 19 (Covid-19) for which there is no effective treatment, so far. ARDS is caused and sustained by an uncontrolled inflammatory activation characterized by a massive release of cytokines (cytokine storm), diffuse lung oedema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and disseminated coagulation. Macrophage and T lymphocyte dysfunction plays a central role in this syndrome. In several experimental in vitro and in vivo models, many of these pathophysiological changes are triggered by stimulation of the P2X7 receptor. We hypothesize that this receptor might be an ideal candidate to target in Covid-19-associated severe pneumonia. LINKED ARTICLES: This article is part of a themed issue on The Pharmacology of COVID-19. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v177.21/issuetoc.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/drug effects , /drug therapy , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Macrophages/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/pathology
8.
J Gastrointestin Liver Dis ; 29(3): 473-475, 2020 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005155
9.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 16(10): 1811-1813, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005004

ABSTRACT

None: A middle-aged man with obstructive sleep apnea who had been treated with continuous positive airway pressure developed COVID-19. An analysis of airflow records from the continuous positive airway pressure machine revealed a rise in his respiratory rate on the night before the onset of COVID-19-related symptoms, while his nocturnal respiratory rate had been stable during the 18-month period prior to the presently reported episode. The present case suggests that a rise in respiratory rate detected using continuous positive airway pressure machine data could be an important sign of impending acute illness, such as COVID-19. Studies to elucidate the usefulness of this method are warranted.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiratory Rate/physiology , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Polysomnography/methods
10.
Medwave ; 20(10)30-11-2020.
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1000532

ABSTRACT

Introducción Desde el comienzo de la pandemia de COVID-19, se han desarrollado diversas investigaciones sobre el pronóstico de pacientes con SARS-CoV-2 asociado a factores como edad, condiciones biodemográficas, comorbilidades, factores sociales, parámetros clínicos, hematológicos, marcadores inflamatorios, de coagulación, bioquímicos y gasométricos, entre otros. Hasta ahora, existen escasos estudios que hayan abordado el tema en América Latina, por lo que es de interés conocer el comportamiento de la enfermedad en la región. Objetivo Evaluar el curso del COVID-19 en pacientes ingresados en un centro terciario en Chile y analizar factores predictores, medidos en el período cercano a la admisión, que se asocien al pronóstico vital y al uso de ventilación mecánica invasiva. Métodos Estudio de cohorte retrospectivo realizado en Clínica Indisa de Santiago, Chile. Participaron todos los pacientes de 15 años o más hospitalizados entre el 11 de marzo y el 25 de julio de 2020. Se analizó la letalidad hospitalaria, la complejidad de los casos y se aplicaron modelos de regresión logística para identificar predictores de las variables de resultado definidas. Resultados La muestra estuvo constituida por 785 sujetos. La edad media fue 59 años, 59% fueron hombres y 61,3% tenía comorbilidades. El 45% requirió cuidados intensivos y 24% ventilación mecánica invasiva. La letalidad hospitalaria global fue de 18,7%. En pacientes de unidad de cuidados intensivos fue 32,1% y en quienes recibieron ventilación mecánica invasiva 59,4%. Los factores de riesgo independientes de morir incluyeron la edad (Odds ratio 1,09; intervalo de confianza 95%: 1,07 a 1,12), diabetes (1,68; 1,06 a 2,67), enfermedad pulmonar crónica (2,80; 1,48 a 5,28) y mayores niveles de proteína C reactiva, creatinina y ferritina. No se demostró asociación con el sexo, pertenencia al seguro público de salud, antecedente de cardiopatía, obesidad, ni dímero D. Similares factores fueron predictores de ventilación mecánica invasiva. Conclusiones El pronóstico y factores predictores en esta cohorte de pacientes hospitalizados en Chile por COVID-19 fueron comparables en su mayoría a los reportados en estudios similares de países de mayores ingresos. El sexo masculino no fue un factor de mal pronóstico en este grupo de pacientes.


Introduction Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, extensive research has been done on the prognosis of patients with SARS-CoV-2 associated with age, biodemographic conditions, comorbidities, social factors, clinical parameters, inflammatory blood markers, coagulation, biochemical and blood gas parameters, among others. Few studies have addressed this problem in Latin America, so it is of interest to know how the disease plays out in this region. Objective The purpose of our study is to evaluate the course of COVID-19 in patients admitted to a tertiary center in Chile and to assess factors measured close to hospital admission that may be associated with death and the need for invasive mechanical ventilation. Methods We did a retrospective cohort study at Indisa Clinic in Santiago, Chile. We included all patients aged 15 years and older hospitalized between March 11 and July 25, 2020. Hospital mortality and severity of the cases were analyzed, and logistic regression models were applied to identify predictors of outcome variables. Results The sample included 785 subjects. The mean age was 59 years, 59% were men, and 61.3% had comorbidities. Forty five per cent required intensive care, and 24% invasive mechanical ventilation. The overall hospital fatality rate was 18.7%. In intensive care patients, the case fatality was 32.1%, and in those who received invasive mechanical ventilation, it was 59.4%. Independent risk factors for death included age (odds ratio 1.09; 95% confidence interval: 1.07 to 1.12), diabetes (1.68; 1.06 to 2.67), chronic lung disease (2.80; 1.48 to 5.28), increased C-reactive protein, creatinine, and ferritin. No association with sex, public health insurance, history of heart disease, oxygen saturation upon admission, or D-dimer was found. Similar factors were predictors of invasive mechanical ventilation. Discussion The prognosis and predictive factors in this cohort of patients hospitalized in Chile for COVID-19 were comparable to those reported in similar studies from higher-income countries. Male sex was not associated with a poor prognosis in this group of patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Chile , Sex Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Cohort Studies , Hospital Mortality , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers
11.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 227-236, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990291

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2), has hit the world very hard by affecting millions of people across countries hence posing a major health threat on a global scale. This novel virus is thought to enter and cause infection in its host through the attachment of its structural protein known as the S-glycoprotein to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Given the rapid spread of COVID-19 with its consequences globally, it is mandatory that health caregivers and researchers across all disciplines abreast themselves with the potential effects that this novel virus may have on their fields and the medical society at large. During the infection, the cardiovascular system is affected by unknown pathomechanistic processes, hence accounting for an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among COVID-19 patients. As cardiovascular researchers, we are more concerned about the cardiovascular aspect of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. Hence, this concise review addresses these aspects where CVD as a risk factor of COVID-19, the prevalence of CVDs in COVID-19, and the potential cardiovascular disorders which may evolve owing to COVID-19 are discussed. A better understanding of these issues will be pivotal to improve cardiovascular health during this SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , /metabolism , /physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Renin-Angiotensin System
12.
Rev Bras Ter Intensiva ; 32(3): 354-362, 2020.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983019

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spreads worldwide and is considered a pandemic. The most common manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 infection (coronavirus disease 2019 - COVID-19) is viral pneumonia with varying degrees of respiratory compromise and up to 40% of hospitalized patients might develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. Several clinical trials evaluated the role of corticosteroids in non-COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome with conflicting results. We designed a trial to evaluate the effectiveness of early intravenous dexamethasone administration on the number of days alive and free of mechanical ventilation within 28 days after randomization in adult patients with moderate or severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to confirmed or probable COVID-19. METHODS: This is a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, stratified, multicenter, open-label, controlled trial including 350 patients with early-onset (less than 48 hours before randomization) moderate or severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, defined by the Berlin criteria, due to COVID-19. Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to either standard treatment plus dexamethasone (Intervention Group) or standard treatment without dexamethasone (Control Group). Patients in the intervention group will receive dexamethasone 20mg intravenous once daily for 5 days, followed by dexamethasone 10mg IV once daily for additional 5 days or until intensive care unit discharge, whichever occurs first. The primary outcome is ventilator-free days within 28 days after randomization, defined as days alive and free from invasive mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes are all-cause mortality rates at day 28, evaluation of the clinical status at day 15 assessed with a 6-level ordinal scale, mechanical ventilation duration from randomization to day 28, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score evaluation at 48 hours, 72 hours and 7 days and intensive care unit -free days within 28.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , /drug therapy , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Time Factors
13.
Rev Bras Ter Intensiva ; 32(3): 348-353, 2020.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983018

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A novel coronavirus emerged this year as a cause of viral pneumonia. The main characteristics of the virus are rapid transmission, high contagion capacity and potential severity. The objective of this case series study is to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19) admitted to different intensive care units in Argentina for mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A descriptive, prospective, multicenter case series study was conducted between April 1 and May 8, 2020. Data from patients older than 18 years who were admitted to the intensive care unit for mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure with a positive diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. RESULTS: The variables for 47 patients from 31 intensive care units were recorded: 78.7% were men (median age of 61 years), with a SAPS II score of 43 and a Charlson index score of 3. The initial ventilatory mode was volume control - continuous mandatory ventilation with a tidal volume less than 8mL/kg in 100% of cases, with a median positive end-expiratory pressure of 10.5cmH2O. At the end of the study, 29 patients died, 8 were discharged, and 10 remained hospitalized. The SAPS II score was higher among patients who died (p = 0.046). Charlson comorbidity index was associated with higher mortality (OR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.13 - 4.55, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 and on mechanical ventilation in this series presented clinical variables similar to those described to date in other international reports. Our findings provide data that may predict outcomes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Adult , Aged , Argentina , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Tidal Volume
14.
Rev Bras Ter Intensiva ; 32(3): 337-347, 2020.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982723

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pro-inflammatory markers play a significant role in the disease severity of patients with COVID-19. Thus, anti-inflammatory therapies are attractive agents for potentially combating the uncontrolled inflammatory cascade in these patients. We designed a trial testing tocilizumab versus standard of care intending to improve the outcomes by inhibiting interleukin-6, an important inflammatory mediator in COVID-19. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This open-label multicentre randomized controlled trial will compare clinical outcomes of tocilizumab plus standard of care versus standard of care alone in patients with moderate to severe COVID-19. Two of the following four criteria are required for protocol enrolment: D-dimer > 1,000ng/mL; C reactive protein > 5mg/dL, ferritin > 300mg/dL, and lactate dehydrogenase > upper limit of normal. The primary objective will be to compare the clinical status on day 15, as measured by a 7-point ordinal scale applied in COVID-19 trials worldwide. The primary endpoint will be assessed by an ordinal logistic regression assuming proportional odds ratios adjusted for stratification variables (age and sex). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The TOCIBRAS protocol was approved by local and central (national) ethical committees in Brazil following current national and international guidelines/directives. Each participating center had the study protocol approved by their institutional review boards before initiating protocol enrolment. The data derived from this trial will be published regardless of the results. If proven active, this strategy could alleviate the consequences of the inflammatory response in COVID-19 patients and improve their clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Brazil , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(2): 291-299, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-980830

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize symptoms and disease severity among pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, along with laboratory findings, imaging, and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Pregnant women with COVID-19 infection were identified at two affiliated hospitals in New York City from March 13 to April 19, 2020, for this case series study. Women were diagnosed with COVID-19 infection based on either universal testing on admission or testing because of COVID-19-related symptoms. Disease was classified as either 1) asymptomatic or mild or 2) moderate or severe based on dyspnea, tachypnea, or hypoxia. Clinical and demographic risk factors for moderate or severe disease were analyzed and calculated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs. Laboratory findings and associated symptoms were compared between those with mild or asymptomatic and moderate or severe disease. The clinical courses and associated complications of women hospitalized with moderate and severe disease are described. RESULTS: Of 158 pregnant women with COVID-19 infection, 124 (78%) had mild or asymptomatic disease and 34 (22%) had moderate or severe disease. Of 15 hospitalized women with moderate or severe disease, 10 received respiratory support with supplemental oxygen and one required intubation. Women with moderate or severe disease had a higher likelihood of having an underlying medical comorbidity (50% vs 27%, OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.26-6.02). Asthma was more common among those with moderate or severe disease (24% vs 8%, OR 3.51, 95% CI 1.26-9.75). Women with moderate or severe disease were significantly more likely to have leukopenia and elevated aspartate transaminase and ferritin. Women with moderate or severe disease were at significantly higher risk for cough and chest pain and pressure. Nine women received ICU or step-down-level care, including four for 9 days or longer. Two women underwent preterm delivery because their clinical status deteriorated. CONCLUSION: One in five pregnant women who contracted COVID-19 infection developed moderate or severe disease, including a small proportion with prolonged critical illness who received ICU or step-down-level care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Intensive Care Units , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Tachypnea/etiology , Young Adult
17.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 28(8): 1378-1381, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-980210

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) originated in China in late 2019 and has since spread rapidly to every continent in the world. This pandemic continues to cause widespread personal suffering, along with severe pressure on medical and health care providers. The symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 and the subsequent prognosis are worsened in individuals who have preexisting comorbidities prior to infection by the virus. Individuals with obesity or overweight, insulin resistance, and diabetes typically have chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by increased levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and the inflammasome; this state predisposes to greater risk for infection along with more adverse outcomes. Here, we consider whether a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness induced by prior exercise training may confer some innate immune protection against COVID-19 by attenuating the "cytokine storm syndrome" often experienced by "at risk" individuals.


Subject(s)
Cardiorespiratory Fitness , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cytokines/immunology , Health Status , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , China , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Disease Progression , Exercise , Humans , Inflammation , Insulin Resistance , Obesity/complications , Overweight/complications , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk
18.
Chest ; 158(1): 97-105, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-980155

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global health emergency. The cumulative number of new confirmed cases and deaths are still increasing out of China. Independent predicted factors associated with fatal outcomes remain uncertain. RESEARCH QUESTION: The goal of the current study was to investigate the potential risk factors associated with fatal outcomes from COVID-19 through a multivariate Cox regression analysis and a nomogram model. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 1,590 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 throughout China was established. The prognostic effects of variables, including clinical features and laboratory findings, were analyzed by using Kaplan-Meier methods and a Cox proportional hazards model. A prognostic nomogram was formulated to predict the survival of patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: In this nationwide cohort, nonsurvivors included a higher incidence of elderly people and subjects with coexisting chronic illness, dyspnea, and laboratory abnormalities on admission compared with survivors. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that age ≥ 75 years (hazard ratio [HR], 7.86; 95% CI, 2.44-25.35), age between 65 and 74 years (HR, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.24-9.5), coronary heart disease (HR, 4.28; 95% CI, 1.14-16.13), cerebrovascular disease (HR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.07-8.94), dyspnea (HR, 3.96; 95% CI, 1.42-11), procalcitonin level > 0.5 ng/mL (HR, 8.72; 95% CI, 3.42-22.28), and aspartate aminotransferase level > 40 U/L (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-6.73) were independent risk factors associated with fatal outcome. A nomogram was established based on the results of multivariate analysis. The internal bootstrap resampling approach suggested the nomogram has sufficient discriminatory power with a C-index of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.85-0.97). The calibration plots also showed good consistency between the prediction and the observation. INTERPRETATION: The proposed nomogram accurately predicted clinical outcomes of patients with COVID-19 based on individual characteristics. Earlier identification, more intensive surveillance, and appropriate therapy should be considered in patients at high risk.


Subject(s)
Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Dyspnea , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Correlation of Data , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Nomograms , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prognosis , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Survival Analysis
20.
IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control ; 67(11): 2230-2240, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978669

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in December of 2019, clinicians and scientists all over the world have faced overwhelming new challenges that not only threaten their own communities and countries but also the world at large. These challenges have been enormous and debilitating, as the infrastructure of many countries, including developing ones, had little or no resources to deal with the crisis. Even in developed countries, such as Italy, health systems have been so inundated by cases that health care facilities became oversaturated and could not accommodate the unexpected influx of patients to be tested. Initially, resources were focused on testing to identify those who were infected. When it became clear that the virus mainly attacks the lungs by causing parenchymal changes in the form of multifocal pneumonia of different levels of severity, imaging became paramount in the assessment of disease severity, progression, and even response to treatment. As a result, there was a need to establish protocols for imaging of the lungs in these patients. In North America, the focus was on chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) as these are widely available and accessible at most health facilities. However, in Europe and China, this was not the case, and a cost-effective and relatively fast imaging modality was needed to scan a large number of sick patients promptly. Hence, ultrasound (US) found its way into the hands of Chinese and European physicians and has since become an important imaging modality in those locations. US is a highly versatile, portable, and inexpensive imaging modality that has application across a broad spectrum of conditions and, in this way, is ideally suited to assess the lungs of COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This bedside test can be done with little to no movement of the patients from the unit that keeps them in their isolated rooms, thereby limiting further exposure to other health personnel. This article presents a basic introduction to COVID-19 and the use of the US for lung imaging. It further provides a high-level overview of the existing US technologies that are driving development in current and potential future US imaging systems for lung, with a specific emphasis on portable and 3-D systems.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Betacoronavirus , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Imaging, Three-Dimensional , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology
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