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1.
Viruses ; 12(6)2020 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726022

ABSTRACT

There is currently debate about human coronavirus (HCoV) seasonality and pathogenicity, as epidemiological data are scarce. Here, we provide epidemiological and clinical features of HCoV patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) examined in primary care general practice. We also describe HCoV seasonality over six influenza surveillance seasons (week 40 to 15 of each season) from the period 2014/2015 to 2019/2020 in Corsica (France). A sample of patients of all ages presenting for consultation for influenza-like illness (ILI) or ARI was included by physicians of the French Sentinelles Network during this period. Nasopharyngeal samples were tested for the presence of 21 respiratory pathogens by real-time RT-PCR. Among the 1389 ILI/ARI patients, 105 were positive for at least one HCoV (7.5%). On an annual basis, HCoVs circulated from week 48 (November) to weeks 14-15 (May) and peaked in week 6 (February). Overall, among the HCoV-positive patients detected in this study, HCoV-OC43 was the most commonly detected virus, followed by HCoV-NL63, HCoV-HKU1, and HCoV-229E. The HCoV detection rates varied significantly with age (p = 0.00005), with the age group 0-14 years accounting for 28.6% (n = 30) of HCoV-positive patients. Fever and malaise were less frequent in HCoV patients than in influenza patients, while sore throat, dyspnoea, rhinorrhoea, and conjunctivitis were more associated with HCoV positivity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HCoV subtypes appear in ARI/ILI patients seen in general practice, with characteristic outbreak patterns primarily in winter. This study also identified symptoms associated with HCoVs in patients with ARI/ILI. Further studies with representative samples should be conducted to provide additional insights into the epidemiology and clinical features of HCoVs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Primary Health Care , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Young Adult
2.
Molecules ; 26(22)2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512513

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 outbreak has highlighted the need for the development of new vaccines and drugs to combat Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Recently, various drugs have been proposed as potentially effective against COVID-19, such as remdesivir, infliximab and imatinib. Natural plants have been used as an alternative source of drugs for thousands of years, and some of them are effective for the treatment of various viral diseases. Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthracene-9,10-dione) is a biologically active anthraquinone with antiviral activity that is found in various plants. We studied the selectivity of electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions on an emodin core (halogenation, nitration and sulfonation), which resulted in a library of emodin derivatives. The main aim of this work was to carry out an initial evaluation of the potential to improve the activity of emodin against human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) and also to generate a set of initial SAR guidelines. We have prepared emodin derivatives which displayed significant anti-HCoV-NL63 activity. We observed that halogenation of emodin can improve its antiviral activity. The most active compound in this study was the iodinated emodin analogue E_3I, whose anti-HCoV-NL63 activity was comparable to that of remdesivir. Evaluation of the emodin analogues also revealed some unwanted toxicity to Vero cells. Since new synthetic routes are now available that allow modification of the emodin structure, it is reasonable to expect that analogues with significantly improved anti-HCoV-NL63 activity and lowered toxicity may thus be generated.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/drug effects , Emodin/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Emodin/chemical synthesis , Halogenation , Humans , Vero Cells
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20143, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462040

ABSTRACT

Rapid, high-throughput diagnostic tests are essential to decelerate the spread of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. While RT-PCR tests performed in centralized laboratories remain the gold standard, rapid point-of-care antigen tests might provide faster results. However, they are associated with markedly reduced sensitivity. Bedside breath gas analysis of volatile organic compounds detected by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) may enable a quick and sensitive point-of-care testing alternative. In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated whether gas analysis by IMS can discriminate severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from other respiratory viruses in an experimental set-up. Repeated gas analyses of air samples collected from the headspace of virus-infected in vitro cultures were performed for 5 days. A three-step decision tree using the intensities of four spectrometry peaks correlating to unidentified volatile organic compounds allowed the correct classification of SARS-CoV-2, human coronavirus-NL63, and influenza A virus H1N1 without misassignment when the calculation was performed with data 3 days post infection. The forward selection assignment model allowed the identification of SARS-CoV-2 with high sensitivity and specificity, with only one of 231 measurements (0.43%) being misclassified. Thus, volatile organic compound analysis by IMS allows highly accurate differentiation of SARS-CoV-2 from other respiratory viruses in an experimental set-up, supporting further research and evaluation in clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/isolation & purification , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Point-of-Care Testing , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/instrumentation , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Diagnosis, Differential , High-Throughput Screening Assays/instrumentation , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Ion Mobility Spectrometry , Proof of Concept Study , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vero Cells
4.
J Clin Virol ; 136: 104754, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385860

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The four seasonal coronaviruses 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1 are frequent causes of respiratory infections and show annual and seasonal variation. Increased understanding about these patterns could be informative about the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Results from PCR diagnostics for the seasonal coronaviruses, and other respiratory viruses, were obtained for 55,190 clinical samples analyzed at the Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, between 14 September 2009 and 2 April 2020. RESULTS: Seasonal coronaviruses were detected in 2130 samples (3.9 %) and constituted 8.1 % of all virus detections. OC43 was most commonly detected (28.4 % of detections), followed by NL63 (24.0 %), HKU1 (17.6 %), and 229E (15.3 %). The overall fraction of positive samples was similar between seasons, but at species level there were distinct biennial alternating peak seasons for the Alphacoronaviruses, 229E and NL63, and the Betacoronaviruses, OC43 and HKU1, respectively. The Betacoronaviruses peaked earlier in the winter season (Dec-Jan) than the Alphacoronaviruses (Feb-Mar). Coronaviruses were detected across all ages, but diagnostics were more frequently requested for paediatric patients than adults and the elderly. OC43 and 229E incidence was relatively constant across age strata, while that of NL63 and HKU1 decreased with age. CONCLUSIONS: Both the Alphacoronaviruses and Betacoronaviruses showed alternating biennial winter incidence peaks, which suggests some type of immune mediated interaction. Symptomatic reinfections in adults and the elderly appear relatively common. Both findings may be of relevance for the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Common Cold/epidemiology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Deltacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Sweden
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(25): e26446, 2021 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279283

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Viruses are the most common pathogens that can cause infection-related non-recurrent death after transplantation, occurring mostly from the early stages of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to within 1 year after transplantation. Human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 is a coronavirus that could cause mortality among patients with underlying disease complications. Serological tests are of limited diagnostic value in immunocompromised hosts and cases of latent infection reactivation. In contrast, macro-genomic high-throughput (DNA and RNA) sequencing allows for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infecting pathogens for targeted treatment. PATIENT CONCERNS: In this report, we describe a patient who exhibited acute B-lymphocytic leukemia and developed complicated pulmonary HCoV-NL63 infection after a second allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT). Six months after the second allo-HSCT, he developed sudden-onset hyperthermia and cough with decreased oxygen saturation. Chest computed tomography (CT) suggested bilateral multiple rounded ground-glass opacities with the pulmonary lobules as units. DIAGNOSES: HCoV-NL63 was detected by metagenomic next-generation sequencing (NGS), and HCoV-NL63 viral pneumonia was diagnosed. INTERVENTIONS: The treatment was mainly based on the use of antiviral therapy, hormone administration, and gamma-globulin. OUTCOMES: After the therapy, the body temperature returned to normal, the chest CT findings had improved on review, and the viral copy number eventually became negative. LESSONS: The latest NGS is an effective method for early infection diagnosis. The HCoV-NL63 virus can cause inflammatory factor storm and alter the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). This case suggests that the patient's NLR and cytokine levels could be monitored during the clinical treatment to assess the disease and its treatment outcome in a timely manner.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Leukemia, B-Cell/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Leukemia, B-Cell/immunology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Metagenomics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects , Young Adult , gamma-Globulins/administration & dosage
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 244, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257121

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) are responsible for significant proportions of illnesses and deaths annually. Most of ARIs are of viral etiology, with human coronaviruses (HCoVs) playing a key role. This study was conducted prior to the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) to provide evidence about the sero-epidemiology of HCoVs in rural areas of Ghana. METHODS: this was a cross-sectional study conducted as part of a large epidemiological study investigating the occurrence of respiratory viruses in 3 rural areas of Ghana; Buoyem, Kwamang and Forikrom. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of IgG-antibodies to three HCoVs; HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 using immunofluorescence assay. RESULTS: of 201 subjects enrolled into the study, 97 (48.3%) were positive for all three viruses. The most prevalent virus was HCoV-229E (23%; 95% CI: 17.2 - 29.3), followed by HCoV-OC43 (17%; 95% CI: 12.4 - 23.4), then HCoV-NL63 (8%, 95% CI: 4.6 - 12.6). Subjects in Kwamang had the highest sero-prevalence for HCoV-NL63 (68.8%). human coronaviruses-229E (41.3%) and HCoV-OC43 (45.7%) were much higher in Forikrom compared to the other study areas. There was however no statistical difference between place of origin and HCoVs positivity. Although blood group O+ and B+ were most common among the recruited subjects, there was no significant association (p = 0.163) between blood group and HCoV infection. CONCLUSION: this study reports a 48.3% sero-prevalence of HCoVs (OC43, NL63 and 229E) among rural communities in Ghana. The findings provide useful baseline data that could inform further sero-epidemiological studies on SARS-CoV-2 in Africa.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
7.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(3): e252-e255, 2021 06.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242314

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infections (CoV) are common in pediatric patients. In general, they produce a mild clinical presentation consisting of an upper respiratory tract infection that does not usually infect the lungs, with the exception of preterm infants and children with chronic diseases. These infections exceptionally affect other organs (heart, brain, gastrointestinal tract), thus increasing their severity. In relation to the temporal coincidence with the beginning of the current situation of pandemic by the new beta coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 responsible for its associated disease (COVID-19), this study presents a clinical case of a 5-year-old patient showing multiple-organ failure and neurological sequelae due to bulbar injury and vascular thrombosis caused by an alpha coronavirus (CoV-NL63) due to its severity and exceptionality.


Las infecciones por coronavirus son habituales en los pacientes pediátricos. Por lo general, producen un cuadro clínico leve de infección del tracto respiratorio superior que no suele afectar a los pulmones, salvo en prematuros y niños con enfermedades crónicas de base. Excepcionalmente, afectan a otros órganos (corazón, cerebro, tracto gastrointestinal) e incrementan su gravedad. En relación con la coincidencia temporal con el inicio de la actual pandemia por el nuevo beta coronavirus (SARSCoV- 2), responsable de su enfermedad asociada (COVID-19), se presenta el caso clínico de un paciente de 5 años con fracaso multiorgánico y secuelas neurológicas por afectación bulbar y trombosis vascular ocasionados por un alfa coronavirus (CoVNL63) debido a su gravedad y excepcionalidad.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications
8.
Virol J ; 18(1): 89, 2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209064

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerging has put global public health institutes on high alert. Little is known about the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of human coronaviruses infections in relation to infections with other respiratory viruses. METHODS: From February 2017 to December 2019, 3660 respiratory samples submitted to Zhejiang Children Hospital with acute respiratory symptoms were tested for four human coronaviruses RNA by a novel two-tube multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Samples were also screened for the occurrence of SARS-CoV-2 by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. RESULTS: Coronavirus RNAs were detected in 144 (3.93%) specimens: HCoV-HKU1 in 38 specimens, HCoV-NL63 in 62 specimens, HCoV-OC43 in 38 specimens and HCoV-229E in 8 specimens. Genomes for SARS-CoV-2 were absent in all specimens by RT-PCR analysis during the study period. The majority of HCoV infections occurred during fall months. No significant differences in gender, sample type, year were seen across species. 37.5 to 52.6% of coronaviruses detected were in specimens testing positive for other respiratory viruses. Phylogenic analysis identified that Zhejiang coronaviruses belong to multiple lineages of the coronaviruses circulating in other countries and areas. CONCLUSION: Common HCoVs may have annual peaks of circulation in fall months in the Zhejiang province, China. Genetic relatedness to the coronaviruses in other regions suggests further surveillance on human coronaviruses in clinical samples are clearly needed to understand their patterns of activity and role in the emergence of novel coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Phylogeny , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
9.
Virol J ; 18(1): 93, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208555

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection can present with a broad clinical differential that includes many other respiratory viruses; therefore, accurate tests are crucial to distinguish true COVID-19 cases from pathogens that do not require urgent public health interventions. Co-circulation of other respiratory viruses is largely unknown during the COVID-19 pandemic but would inform strategies to rapidly and accurately test patients with respiratory symptoms. METHODS: This study retrospectively examined 298,415 respiratory specimens collected from symptomatic patients for SARS-CoV-2 testing in the three months since COVID-19 was initially documented in the province of Alberta, Canada (March-May, 2020). By focusing on 52,285 specimens that were also tested with the Luminex Respiratory Pathogen Panel for 17 other pathogens, this study examines the prevalence of 18 potentially co-circulating pathogens and their relative rates in prior years versus since COVID-19 emerged, including four endemic coronaviruses. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was identified in 2.2% of all specimens. Parallel broad multiplex testing detected additional pathogens in only 3.4% of these SARS-CoV-2-positive specimens: significantly less than in SARS-CoV-2-negative specimens (p < 0.0001), suggesting very low rates of SARS-CoV-2 co-infection. Furthermore, the overall co-infection rate was significantly lower among specimens with SARS-CoV-2 detected (p < 0.0001). Finally, less than 0.005% of all specimens tested positive for both SARS-CoV-2 and any of the four endemic coronaviruses tested, strongly suggesting neither co-infection nor cross-reactivity between these coronaviruses. CONCLUSIONS: Broad respiratory pathogen testing rarely detected additional pathogens in SARS-CoV-2-positive specimens. While helpful to understand co-circulation of respiratory viruses causing similar symptoms as COVID-19, ultimately these broad tests were resource-intensive and inflexible in a time when clinical laboratories face unprecedented demand for respiratory virus testing, with further increases expected during influenza season. A transition from broad, multiplex tests toward streamlined diagnostic algorithms targeting respiratory pathogens of public health concern could simultaneously reduce the overall burden on clinical laboratories while prioritizing testing of pathogens of public health importance. This is particularly valuable with ongoing strains on testing resources, exacerbated during influenza seasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Alberta/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification , Pandemics , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 246-255, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-774889

ABSTRACT

Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is primarily associated with common cold in children, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Outbreaks caused by HCoV-NL63 are rare. Here we report a cluster of HCoV-NL63 cases with severe lower respiratory tract infection that arose in Guangzhou, China, in 2018. Twenty-three hospitalized children were confirmed to be HCoV-NL63 positive, and most of whom were hospitalized with severe pneumonia or acute bronchitis. Whole genomes of HCoV-NL63 were obtained using next-generation sequencing. Phylogenetic and single amino acid polymorphism analyses showed that this outbreak was associated with two subgenotypes (C3 and B) of HCoV-NL63. Half of patients were identified to be related to a new subgenotype C3. One unique amino acid mutation at I507 L in spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD) was detected, which segregated this subgenotype C3 from other known subgenotypes. Pseudotyped virus bearing the I507 L mutation in RBD showed enhanced entry into host cells as compared to the prototype virus. This study proved that HCoV-NL63 was undergoing continuous mutation and has the potential to cause severe lower respiratory disease in humans.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Child, Preschool , China , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Genotype , Humans , Infant , Phylogeny
11.
Biomolecules ; 10(3)2020 02 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-13514

ABSTRACT

Strobilanthes cusia (Nees) Kuntze is a Chinese herbal medicine used in the treatment of respiratory virus infections. The methanol extract of S. cusia leaf contains chemical components such as ß-sitosterol, indirubin, tryptanthrin, betulin, indigodole A, and indigodole B that have diverse biological activities. However, the antiviral action of S. cusia leaf and its components against human coronavirus remains to be elucidated. Human coronavirus NL63 infection is frequent among immunocompromised individuals, young children, and in the elderly. This study investigated the anti-Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) activity of the methanol extract of S. cusia leaf and its major components. The methanol extract of S. cusia leaf effectively inhibited the cytopathic effect (CPE) and virus yield (IC50 = 0.64 µg/mL) in HCoV-NL63-infected cells. Moreover, this extract potently inhibited the HCoV-NL63 infection in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the six components identified in the methanol extract of S. cusia leaf, tryptanthrin and indigodole B (5aR-ethyltryptanthrin) exhibited potent antiviral activity in reducing the CPE and progeny virus production. The IC50 values against virus yield were 1.52 µM and 2.60 µM for tryptanthrin and indigodole B, respectively. Different modes of time-of-addition/removal assay indicated that tryptanthrin prevented the early and late stages of HCoV-NL63 replication, particularly by blocking viral RNA genome synthesis and papain-like protease 2 activity. Notably, tryptanthrin (IC50 = 0.06 µM) and indigodole B (IC50 = 2.09 µM) exhibited strong virucidal activity as well. This study identified tryptanthrin as the key active component of S. cusia leaf methanol extract that acted against HCoV-NL63 in a cell-type independent manner. The results specify that tryptanthrin possesses antiviral potential against HCoV-NL63 infection.


Subject(s)
Acanthaceae/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/physiology , Quinazolines/pharmacology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Acanthaceae/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Leaves/chemistry , Plant Leaves/metabolism , Quinazolines/chemistry , Quinazolines/isolation & purification , Quinazolines/therapeutic use
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