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1.
Intern Med ; 61(20): 3053-3062, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079926

ABSTRACT

Objective To examine the continuation of antibody prevalence status after 12 months and background factors in antibody-positive subjects following asymptomatic infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Methods We initially determined the SARS-CoV-2 anti-nucleocapsid protein immunoglobulin G (anti-N IgG) antibody prevalence in 1,603 patients, doctors, and nurses at 65 medical institutions in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We then obtained consent from 33 of the 39 subjects who tested positive and performed follow-up for 12 months. Results Follow-up for up to 12 months showed that a long-term response of the anti-N IgG antibody could be detected in 6 of the 33 participants (18.2%). The proportions with hypertension, using an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and without a drinking habit were higher among the participants with a long-term anti-N IgG antibody response for up to 12 months than among those without a long-term antibody response. Conclusions The proportion of individuals with subclinical COVID-19 who continuously had a positive result for the anti-N IgG antibody at 12 months was low.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunoglobulin G , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Nature ; 609(7928): 785-792, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972633

ABSTRACT

Highly pathogenic coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (refs. 1,2) (SARS-CoV-2), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus3 (MERS-CoV) and SARS-CoV-1 (ref. 4), vary in their transmissibility and pathogenicity. However, infection by all three viruses results in substantial apoptosis in cell culture5-7 and in patient tissues8-10, suggesting a potential link between apoptosis and pathogenesis of coronaviruses. Here we show that caspase-6, a cysteine-aspartic protease of the apoptosis cascade, serves as an important host factor for efficient coronavirus replication. We demonstrate that caspase-6 cleaves coronavirus nucleocapsid proteins, generating fragments that serve as interferon antagonists, thus facilitating virus replication. Inhibition of caspase-6 substantially attenuates lung pathology and body weight loss in golden Syrian hamsters infected with SARS-CoV-2 and improves the survival of mice expressing human DPP4 that are infected with mouse-adapted MERS-CoV. Our study reveals how coronaviruses exploit a component of the host apoptosis cascade to facilitate virus replication.


Subject(s)
Aspartic Acid , Caspase 6 , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Cysteine , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Virus Replication , Animals , Apoptosis , Aspartic Acid/metabolism , Caspase 6/metabolism , Coronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Cricetinae , Cysteine/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Humans , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mesocricetus , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , Weight Loss
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0262591, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968842

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid (N) is the most abundant viral protein expressed in host samples and is an important antigen for diagnosis. N is a 45 kDa protein that does not present disulfide bonds. Intending to avoid non-specific binding of SARS-CoV-2 N to antibodies from patients who previously had different coronaviruses, a 35 kDa fragment of N was expressed without a conserved motif in E. coli as inclusion bodies (N122-419-IB). Culture media and IB washing conditions were chosen to obtain N122-419-IB with high yield (370 mg/L bacterial culture) and protein purity (90%). High pressure solubilizes protein aggregates by weakening hydrophobic and ionic interactions and alkaline pH promotes solubilization by electrostatic repulsion. The association of pH 9.0 and 2.4 kbar promoted efficient solubilization of N122-419-IB without loss of native-like tertiary structure that N presents in IB. N122-419 was refolded with a yield of 85% (326 mg/L culture) and 95% purity. The refolding process takes only 2 hours and the protein is ready for use after pH adjustment, avoiding the necessity of dialysis or purification. Antibody binding of COVID-19-positive patients sera to N122-419 was confirmed by Western blotting. ELISA using N122-419 is effective in distinguishing between sera presenting antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 from those who do not. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed condition for IB solubilization is one of the mildest described. It is possible that the refolding process can be extended to a wide range of proteins with high yields and purity, even those that are sensible to very alkaline pH.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antigens, Viral/chemistry , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Inclusion Bodies/chemistry , Protein Refolding , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Escherichia coli/genetics , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrostatic Pressure , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Solubility
4.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(9): 1859-1862, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963356

ABSTRACT

Given widespread use of spike antibody in generating coronavirus disease vaccines, SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antibodies are increasingly used to indicate previous infection in serologic surveys. However, longitudinal kinetics and seroreversion are poorly defined. We found substantial seroreversion of nucleocapsid total immunoglobulin, underscoring the need to account for seroreversion in seroepidemiologic studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Kinetics , Nucleocapsid , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies
5.
Biosci Rep ; 41(9)2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915305

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused the global pandemic of the Coronavirus disease in late 2019 (COVID-19). Vaccine development efforts have predominantly been aimed at 'Extra-viral' Spike (S) protein as vaccine vehicles, but there are concerns regarding 'viral immune escape' since multiple mutations may enable the mutated virus strains to escape from immunity against S protein. The 'Intra-viral' Nucleocapsid (N-protein) is relatively conserved among mutant strains of coronaviruses during spread and evolution. Herein, we demonstrate novel vaccine candidates against SARS-CoV-2 by using the whole conserved N-protein or its fragment/peptides. Using ELISA assay, we showed that high titers of specific anti-N antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgM) were maintained for a reasonably long duration (> 5 months), suggesting that N-protein is an excellent immunogen to stimulate host immune system and robust B-cell activation. We synthesized three peptides located at the conserved regions of N-protein among CoVs. One peptide showed as a good immunogen for vaccination as well. Cytokine arrays on post-vaccination mouse sera showed progressive up-regulation of various cytokines such as IFN-γ and CCL5, suggesting that TH1 associated responses are also stimulated. Furthermore, vaccinated mice exhibited an elevated memory T cells population. Here, we propose an unconventional vaccine strategy targeting the conserved N-protein as an alternative vaccine target for coronaviruses. Moreover, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody specifically against an epitope shared between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, and we are currently developing the First-in-Class humanized anti-N-protein antibody to potentially treat patients infected by various CoVs in the future.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Mice , Models, Animal , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/genetics , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology
6.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 10366, 2022 06 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900657

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has resulted in over 6 million reported deaths worldwide being one of the biggest challenges the world faces today. Here we present optimizations of all steps of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based test to detect IgG, IgA and IgM against the trimeric spike (S) protein, receptor binding domain (RBD), and N terminal domain of the nucleocapsid (N-NTD) protein of SARS-CoV-2. We discuss how to determine specific thresholds for antibody positivity and its limitations according to the antigen used. We applied the assay to a cohort of 126 individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 23 PCR-positive individuals and 103 individuals without a confirmed diagnosis for SARS-CoV-2 infection. To illustrate the differences in serological responses to vaccinal immunization, we applied the test in 18 individuals from our cohort before and after receiving ChAdOx-1 nCoV-19 or CoronaVac vaccines. Taken together, our results show that the test can be customized at different stages depending on its application, enabling the user to analyze different cohorts, saving time, reagents, or samples. It is also a valuable tool for elucidating the immunological consequences of new viral strains and monitoring vaccination coverage and duration of response to different immunization regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Seroconversion , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Brazil , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
7.
EBioMedicine ; 75: 103805, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Two doses of mRNA vaccination have shown >94% efficacy at preventing COVID-19 mostly in naïve adults, but it is not clear if the second dose is needed to maximize effectiveness in those previously exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and what other factors affect responsiveness. METHODS: We measured IgA, IgG and IgM levels against SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) and nucleocapsid (N) antigens from the wild-type and S from the Alpha, Beta and Gamma variants of concern, after BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) or mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccination in a cohort of health care workers (N=578). Neutralizing capacity and antibody avidity were evaluated. Data were analyzed in relation to COVID-19 history, comorbidities, vaccine doses, brand and adverse events. FINDINGS: Vaccination induced robust IgA and IgG levels against all S antigens. Neutralization capacity and S IgA and IgG levels were higher in mRNA-1273 vaccinees, previously SARS-CoV-2 exposed, particularly if symptomatic, and in those experiencing systemic adverse effects (p<0·05). A second dose in pre-exposed did not increase antibody levels. Smoking and comorbidities were associated with 43% (95% CI, 19-59) and 45% (95% CI, 63-18) lower neutralization, respectively, and 35% (95% CI, 3-57%) and 55% (95% CI, 33-70%) lower antibody levels, respectively. Among fully vaccinated, 6·3% breakthroughs were detected up to 189 days post-vaccination. Among pre-exposed non-vaccinated, 90% were IgG seropositive more than 300 days post-infection. INTERPRETATION: Our data support administering a single-dose in pre-exposed healthy individuals as primary vaccination. However, heterogeneity of responses suggests that personalized recommendations may be necessary depending on COVID-19 history and life-style. Higher mRNA-1273 immunogenicity would be beneficial for those expected to respond worse to vaccination and in face of variants that escape immunity such as Omicron. Persistence of antibody levels in pre-exposed unvaccinated indicates maintenance of immunity up to one year. FUNDING: This work was supported by Institut de Salut Global de Barcelona (ISGlobal) internal funds, in-kind contributions from Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, the Fundació Privada Daniel Bravo Andreu, and European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) Health (grant number 20877), supported by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, a body of the European Union receiving support from the H2020 Research and Innovation Programme. We acknowledge support from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and State Research Agency through the "Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa 2019-2023" Program (CEX2018-000806-S), and support from the Generalitat de Catalunya through the CERCA Program. L. I. work was supported by PID2019-110810RB-I00 grant from the Spanish Ministry of Science & Innovation. Development of SARS-CoV-2 reagents was partially supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (contract number HHSN272201400008C). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, the decision to publish, or the preparation of the manuscript.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , Antibody Formation/drug effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , /immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
8.
BMC Microbiol ; 21(1): 351, 2021 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus (SARS-CoV-2) is a current worldwide threat for which the immunological features after infection need to be investigated. The aim of this study was to establish a highly sensitive and quantitative detection method for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody and to compare the antibody reaction difference in patients with different disease severity. RESULTS: Recombinant SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to establish an indirect IgG ELISA detection system. The sensitivity of the ELISA was 100% with a specificity of 96.8% and a 98.3% concordance when compared to a colloidal gold kit, in addition, the sensitivity of the ELISA was 100% with a specificity of 98.9% and a 99.4% concordance when compared to a SARS-CoV-2 spike S1 protein IgG antibody ELISA kit. The increased sensitivity resulted in a higher rate of IgG antibody detection for COVID-19 patients. Moreover, the quantitative detection can be conducted with a much higher serum dilution (1:400 vs 1:10, 1:400 vs 1:100). The antibody titers of 88 patients with differing COVID-19 severity at their early convalescence ranged from 800 to 102,400, and the geometric mean titer for severe and critical cases, moderate cases, asymptomatic and mild cases was 51,203, 20,912, and 9590 respectively. CONCLUSION: The development of a highly sensitive ELISA system for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies is described herein. This system enabled a quantitative study of rSARS-CoV-2-N IgG antibody titers in COVID-19 patients, the occurrence of higher IgG antibody titers were found to be correlated with more severe cases.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
9.
Viruses ; 14(5)2022 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820421

ABSTRACT

Serological detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), and neutralizing antibodies (Abs) is commonly undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination. However, the relative efficiency of different SARS-CoV-2 Ab detection systems has not been extensively investigated. Here, we evaluated serological test systems in vaccinated Japanese. SARS-CoV-2 N, S, and neutralizing Abs in sera of 375 healthy subjects a mean 253 days after vaccination were assessed. The sensitivity of Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S (Roche S) and Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S IgG (Fujirebio S) was 100% and 98.9%, respectively, with a specificity of 100% for both. The sensitivity of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing Ab (MBL Neu) was 2.7%, and the specificity was 100%. Fujirebio S correlated with Roche S (rho = 0.9182, p = 3.97 × 10-152). Fujirebio S (rho = 0.1295, p = 0.0121) and Roche S (rho = 0.1232, p = 0.0170) correlated weakly with MBL Neu. However, Roche S did correlate with MBL Neu in patients with COVID-19 (rho = 0.8299, p = 1.01 × 10-12) and in healthy subjects more recently after vaccination (mean of 90 days, rho = 0.5306, p = 0.0003). Thus, the Fujirebio S and Roche S results were very similar, but neither correlated with neutralizing antibody titers by MBL Neu at a later time after vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Japan , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742485

ABSTRACT

The B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system are important for the control of most viral infections, including COVID-19. Identification of epitopes recognized by these cells is fundamental for understanding how the immune system detects and removes pathogens, and for antiviral vaccine design. Intriguingly, several cross-reactive T lymphocyte epitopes from SARS-CoV-2 with other betacoronaviruses responsible for the common cold have been identified. In addition, antibodies that cross-recognize the spike protein, but not the nucleoprotein (N protein), from different betacoronavirus have also been reported. Using a consensus of eight bioinformatic methods for predicting B-cell epitopes and the collection of experimentally detected epitopes for SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, we identified four surface-exposed, conserved, and hypothetical antigenic regions that are exclusive of the N protein. These regions were analyzed using ELISA assays with two cohorts: SARS-CoV-2 infected patients and pre-COVID-19 samples. Here we describe four epitopes from SARS-CoV-2 N protein that are recognized by the humoral response from multiple individuals infected with COVID-19, and are conserved in other human coronaviruses. Three of these linear surface-exposed sequences and their peptide homologs in SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-OC43 were also recognized by antibodies from pre-COVID-19 serum samples, indicating cross-reactivity of antibodies against coronavirus N proteins. Different conserved human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cross-reactive B epitopes against SARS-CoV-2 N protein are detected in a significant fraction of individuals not exposed to this pandemic virus. These results have potential clinical implications.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Epitope Mapping/methods , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Amino Acid Sequence , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Cross Reactions/genetics , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 820126, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715000

ABSTRACT

This study aims to assess the immunological response and impact on virological control of the mRNA vaccines for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among people living with HIV (PLWH). In this single-center observational study, all PLWH were offered vaccination with mRNA1273 or BNT162b2. Both anti-N and anti-S1-receptor binding domain (RBD) antibodies were measured together with HIV-1 RNA levels after the first dose (M0) and then at 1 (M1), 2 (M2) and 6 (M6) months later. A total of 131 individuals (median age: 54 years [IQR: 47.0-60.5]; male: 70.2%; median baseline CD4 T-cell: 602/µl [IQR 445.0-825.5]; median nadir CD4 T-cells 223/µl [IQR 111.0-330.0]) were included. All participants were positive for anti-RBD antibodies at 30 days, 60 days and 6 months after the first dose, with no statistical difference between those with HIV-1 RNA below or >20 copies/ml. HIV-1 RNA data were collected for 128 patients at baseline and 30 days after the first dose; for 124 individuals, 30 days after the second dose; and for 83 patients, 6 months after the first dose. Nineteen (14.8%) of 128 had detectable HIV-1 RNA (>20 copies/ml) at M0, 13/128 (10.2%) at M1 (among which 5 were newly detectable), 15/124 (12.1%) at M2 (among which 5 were newly detectable), and 8/83 (9.6%) at M6. No serious adverse effects were reported. All participants elicited antibodies after two doses of mRNA vaccines, with only a minor impact on HIV-1 RNA levels over a 6-month period.


Subject(s)
/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV-1/physiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Formation , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Heterologous , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
13.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258819, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706233

ABSTRACT

Inexpensive, simple, rapid diagnostics are necessary for efficient detection, treatment, and mitigation of COVID-19. Assays for SARS-CoV2 using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) offer good sensitivity and excellent specificity, but are expensive, slowed by transport to centralized testing laboratories, and often unavailable. Antigen-based assays are inexpensive and can be rapidly mass-produced and deployed at point-of-care, with lateral flow assays (LFAs) being the most common format. While various manufacturers have produced commercially available SARS-Cov2 antigen LFAs, access to validated tests remains difficult or cost prohibitive in low-and middle-income countries. Herein, we present a visually read open-access LFA (OA-LFA) using commercially-available antibodies and materials for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. The LFA yielded a Limit of Detection (LOD) of 4 TCID50/swab of gamma irradiated SARS-CoV-2 virus, meeting the acceptable analytical sensitivity outlined by in World Health Organization target product profile. The open-source architecture presented in this manuscript provides a template for manufacturers around the globe to rapidly design a SARS-CoV2 antigen test.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Limit of Detection , Point-of-Care Systems , RNA, Viral/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity
14.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 915, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703249

ABSTRACT

Quantitative or qualitative differences in immunity may drive clinical severity in COVID-19. Although longitudinal studies to record the course of immunological changes are ample, they do not necessarily predict clinical progression at the time of hospital admission. Here we show, by a machine learning approach using serum pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral cytokine and anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody measurements as input data, that COVID-19 patients cluster into three distinct immune phenotype groups. These immune-types, determined by unsupervised hierarchical clustering that is agnostic to severity, predict clinical course. The identified immune-types do not associate with disease duration at hospital admittance, but rather reflect variations in the nature and kinetics of individual patient's immune response. Thus, our work provides an immune-type based scheme to stratify COVID-19 patients at hospital admittance into high and low risk clinical categories with distinct cytokine and antibody profiles that may guide personalized therapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunophenotyping/methods , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology
15.
Front Immunol ; 13: 776861, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701723

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular dysfunction and disease are common and frequently fatal complications of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Indeed, from early on during the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic it was recognized that cardiac complications may occur, even in patients with no underlying cardiac disorders, as part of the acute infection, and that these were associated with more severe disease and increased morbidity and mortality. The most common cardiac complication is acute cardiac injury, defined by significant elevation of cardiac troponins. The potential mechanisms of cardiovascular complications include direct viral myocardial injury, systemic inflammation induced by the virus, sepsis, arrhythmia, myocardial oxygen supply-demand mismatch, electrolyte abnormalities, and hypercoagulability. This review is focused on the prevalence, risk factors and clinical course of COVID-19-related myocardial injury, as well as on current data with regard to disease pathogenesis, specifically the interaction of platelets with the vascular endothelium. The latter section includes consideration of the role of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in triggering development of a generalized endotheliitis that, in turn, drives intense activation of platelets. Most prominently, SARS-CoV-2-induced endotheliitis involves interaction of the viral spike protein with endothelial angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) together with alternative mechanisms that involve the nucleocapsid and viroporin. In addition, the mechanisms by which activated platelets intensify endothelial activation and dysfunction, seemingly driven by release of the platelet-derived calcium-binding proteins, SA100A8 and SA100A9, are described. These events create a SARS-CoV-2-driven cycle of intravascular inflammation and coagulation, which contributes significantly to a poor clinical outcome in patients with severe disease.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Platelet Activation/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Myocardium/pathology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
16.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(1): e0256321, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700249

ABSTRACT

We have previously used composite reference standards and latent class analysis (LCA) to evaluate the performance of laboratory assays in the presence of tarnished gold standards. Here, we apply these techniques to repeated, cross-sectional study of Canadian blood donors, whose sera underwent parallel testing with four separate SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays. We designed a repeated cross-sectional design with random cross-sectional sampling of all available retention samples (n = 1500/month) for a 12 -month period from April 2020 until March 2021. Each sample was evaluated for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies using four assays an Abbott Architect assay targeting the nucleocapsid antigen (Abbott-NP, Abbott, Chicago IL) and three in-house IgG ELISAs recognizing distinct recombinant viral antigens: full-length spike glycoprotein (Spike), spike glycoprotein receptor binding domain (RBD) and nucleocapsid (NP). We used two analytic approaches to estimate SAR-CoV-2 seroprevalence: a composite reference standard and LCA. Using LCA to estimate true seropositivity status based on the results of the four antibody tests, we estimated that seroprevalence increased from 0.8% (95% CI: 0.5-1.4%) in April 2020 to 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6%) in March 2021. Our study provides further support for the use of LCA in upcoming public health crises, epidemics, and pandemics when a gold standard assay may not be available or identifiable. IMPORTANCE Here, we describe an approach to estimating seroprevalence in a low prevalence setting when multiple assays are available and yet no known gold standard exists. Because serological studies identify cases through both diagnostic testing and surveillance, and otherwise silent, unrecognized infections, serological data can be used to estimate the true infection fatality ratio of a disease. However, seroprevalence studies rely on assays with imperfect sensitivity and specificity. Seroreversion (loss of antibody response) also occurs over time, and with the advent of vaccination, distinction of antibody response resulting from vaccination as opposed to antibody response due to infection has posed an additional challenge. Our approach indicates that seroprevalence on Canadian blood donors by the end of March 2021was less than 10%. Our study supports the use of latent class analysis in upcoming public health crises, epidemics, and pandemics when a gold standard assay may not be available or identifiable.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Donors/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Canada/epidemiology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
17.
Front Immunol ; 13: 817905, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699973

ABSTRACT

The duration of humoral and cellular immune memory following SARS-CoV-2 infection in populations in least developed countries remains understudied but is key to overcome the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Sixty-four Cambodian individuals with laboratory-confirmed infection with asymptomatic or mild/moderate clinical presentation were evaluated for Spike (S)-binding and neutralizing antibodies and antibody effector functions during acute phase of infection and at 6-9 months follow-up. Antigen-specific B cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were characterized, and T cells were interrogated for functionality at late convalescence. Anti-S antibody titers decreased over time, but effector functions mediated by S-specific antibodies remained stable. S- and nucleocapsid (N)-specific B cells could be detected in late convalescence in the activated memory B cell compartment and are mostly IgG+. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune memory was maintained to S and membrane (M) protein. Asymptomatic infection resulted in decreased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and frequency of SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells at late convalescence. Whereas anti-S antibodies correlated with S-specific B cells, there was no correlation between T cell response and humoral immune memory. Hence, all aspects of a protective immune response are maintained up to nine months after SARS-CoV-2 infection and in the absence of re-infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cambodia , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(8): 10844-10855, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692677

ABSTRACT

The widespread and long-lasting effect of the COVID-19 pandemic has called attention to the significance of technological advances in the rapid diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 virus. This study reports the use of a highly stable buffer-based zinc oxide/reduced graphene oxide (bbZnO/rGO) nanocomposite coated on carbon screen-printed electrodes for electrochemical immuno-biosensing of SARS-CoV-2 nuelocapsid (N-) protein antigens in spiked and clinical samples. The incorporation of a salt-based (ionic) matrix for uniform dispersion of the nanomixture eliminates multistep nanomaterial synthesis on the surface of the electrode and enables a stable single-step sensor nanocoating. The immuno-biosensor provides a limit of detection of 21 fg/mL over a linear range of 1-10 000 pg/mL and exhibits a sensitivity of 32.07 ohms·mL/pg·mm2 for detection of N-protein in spiked samples. The N-protein biosensor is successful in discriminating positive and negative clinical samples within 15 min, demonstrating its proof of concept used as a COVID-19 rapid antigen test.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/analysis , Graphite/chemistry , Nanocomposites/chemistry , Zinc Oxide/chemistry , Antibodies, Immobilized/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , Biosensing Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Electrochemical Techniques/instrumentation , Electrochemical Techniques/methods , Electrodes , Humans , Immunoassay/instrumentation , Immunoassay/methods , Limit of Detection , Phosphoproteins/analysis , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Proof of Concept Study , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry
19.
Front Immunol ; 13: 816220, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686484

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) can trigger severe endemic waves and vaccine breakthrough infections (VBI). We analyzed the cellular and humoral immune response in 8 patients infected with the alpha variant, resulting in moderate to fatal COVID-19 disease manifestation, after double mRNA-based anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. In contrast to the uninfected vaccinated control cohort, the diseased individuals had no detectable high-avidity spike (S)-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against the alpha variant and wild type (WT) at disease onset, whereas a robust CD4+ T-cell response against the N- and M-proteins was generated. Furthermore, a delayed alpha S-reactive high-avidity CD4+ T-cell response was mounted during disease progression. Compared to the vaccinated control donors, these patients also had lower neutralizing antibody titers against the alpha variant at disease onset. The delayed development of alpha S-specific cellular and humoral immunity upon VBI indicates reduced immunogenicity against the S-protein of the alpha VOC, while there was a higher and earlier N- and M-reactive T-cell response. Our findings do not undermine the current vaccination strategies but underline a potential need for the inclusion of VBI patients in alternative vaccination strategies and additional antigenic targets in next-generation SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Affinity/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Coronavirus M Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
20.
Front Immunol ; 13: 811952, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674342

ABSTRACT

Numerous studies have suggested that the titers of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 are associated with the COVID-19 severity, however, the types of antibodies associated with the disease maximum severity and the timing at which the associations are best observed, especially within one week after symptom onset, remain controversial. We attempted to elucidate the antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 that are associated with the maximum severity of COVID-19 in the early phase of the disease, and to investigate whether antibody testing might contribute to prediction of the disease maximum severity in COVID-19 patients. We classified the patients into four groups according to the disease maximum severity (severity group 1 (did not require oxygen supplementation), severity group 2a (required oxygen supplementation at low flow rates), severity group 2b (required oxygen supplementation at relatively high flow rates), and severity group 3 (required mechanical ventilatory support)), and serially measured the titers of IgM, IgG, and IgA against the nucleocapsid protein, spike protein, and receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 until day 12 after symptom onset. The titers of all the measured antibody responses were higher in severity group 2b and 3, especially severity group 2b, as early as at one week after symptom onset. Addition of data obtained from antibody testing improved the ability of analysis models constructed using a machine learning technique to distinguish severity group 2b and 3 from severity group 1 and 2a. These models constructed with non-vaccinated COVID-19 patients could not be applied to the cases of breakthrough infections. These results suggest that antibody testing might help physicians identify non-vaccinated COVID-19 patients who are likely to require admission to an intensive care unit.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/blood , COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Machine Learning , Protein Domains/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors , Vaccination
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