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1.
Virol J ; 19(1): 67, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The newly discovered severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and four seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoVs) (HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1) still circulate worldwide. The early clinical symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal HCoV infections are similar, so rapid and accurate identification of the subtypes of HCoVs is crucial for early diagnosis, early treatment, prevention and control of these infections. However, current multiplex molecular diagnostic techniques for HCoV subtypes including SARS-CoV-2 are limited. METHODS: We designed primers and probes specific for the S and N genes of SARS-CoV-2, the N gene of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and the ORF1ab gene of four seasonal HCoVs, as well as the human B2M gene product. We developed and optimized a quadruple quantitative real-time PCR assay (qq-PCR) for simultaneous detection of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and four seasonal HCoVs. This assay was further tested for specificity and sensitivity, and validated using 184 clinical samples. RESULTS: The limit of detection of the qq-PCR assay was in the range 2.5 × 101 to 6.5 × 101 copies/µL for each gene and no cross-reactivity with other common respiratory viruses was observed. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 0.5-2%. The qq-PCR assay had a 91.9% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity for SARS-CoV-2 and a 95.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity for seasonal HCoVs, using the approved commercial kits as the reference. Compared to the commercial kits, total detection consistency was 98.4% (181/184) for SARS-CoV-2 and 98.6% (142/144) for seasonal HCoVs. CONCLUSION: With the advantages of sensitivity, specificity, rapid detection, cost-effectiveness, and convenience, this qq-PCR assay has potential for clinical use for rapid discrimination between SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and seasonal HCoVs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus NL63, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Humans , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 835333, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775667

ABSTRACT

Human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is the coronavirus most associated with "common colds", infections of the upper respiratory tract. Previously, we reported that direct interactions of nucleocapsid (N) protein and C-terminal domain of Spike protein (Spike CD) are essential for replication of SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV. Thus, we developed a novel ELISA-based strategy targeting these specific interactions to detect SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV. Here, we investigated whether the same principles apply to HCoV-OC43. We discovered that the S protein of HCoV-OC43 interacts with N protein and that cell penetrating Spike CD peptide inhibits virus protein expression and replication of HCoV-OC43. The interaction between HCoV-OC43 S and N proteins were recapitulated with a recombinant HCoV-OC43 Spike CD fusion protein and a recombinant HCoV-OC43 N fusion protein in vitro. By producing an anti-HCoV-OC43 N protein-specific monoclonal antibody, we established a virus detection system based on the interaction between recombinant Spike CD and N protein of HCoV-OC43. We suggest that the interaction between Spike CD and N protein is conserved in coronaviruses and therefore could be a target for therapeutics against both novel coronavirus and its variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins , Humans , Nucleocapsid Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 75(2): 121-126, 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756480

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are distributed globally and they cause a range of respiratory symptoms. Since HCoV infection usually causes mild upper respiratory tract disease and currently has no specific therapy, there are limited reports on its features, especially in adults. We aimed to evaluate the features of HCoV infections in clinical settings. Adult patients with respiratory symptoms from October 2014 to September 2019 at Nagasaki Genbaku Isahaya Hospital were enrolled. Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as performed for 15 viruses, including HCoVs, and eight bacterial species on the patients' respiratory specimens. A total of 121 cases were recruited with HKU1, OC43, 229E, and NL63 strains in 80, 21, 12, and 11 cases, respectively. The percentage of HCoV-infected patients peaked in winter (47.5%). Symptoms of fever (69.4%), cough (47.9%), and comorbidities of asthma/cough variant asthma (34.7%) were frequently observed. Lymphocytopenia and increased C-reactive protein levels were observed in laboratory tests. Co-infection with other viruses was identified in 38.8% of the cases. In the repeat-positive cases, 42% were repeat positive within 100 days. HCoV-infected patients showed winter seasonality with a high frequency of comorbidity with asthma and co-infections. Re-infection within an early period was suspected, but further consideration is required.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Coronavirus , Respiratory Tract Infections , Adult , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Humans
4.
Viral Immunol ; 35(2): 138-141, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758618

ABSTRACT

There are hundreds of coronaviruses, most of which circulate among animals, yet there are seven types that infect humans. Three of them can cause severe acute respiratory illness-SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and MERS-CoV. Other HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-NL63, and HCoV-HKU1 usually cause only mild to moderate upper respiratory tract infections. These four coronaviruses are called seasonal, because they are continuously circulating among human population and are responsible for up to 30% of all respiratory tract infections. Genetically, these low-pathogenic types are related to SARS-CoV-2. That is why questions concerning the cross-reactivity and cross-neutralization between antibodies against different types of coronaviruses have been raised. We addressed these questions by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). We established the upper respiratory infection etiology for three patients who had been vaccinated with Sputnik V and tested positive on anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The symptoms included sore throat, nasal congestion, and myalgia. Their blood serum was analyzed for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in dynamics: before vaccination, and after the first and second dose of the vaccine. After the second dose, all patients were positive for IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. The targeted NGS panel sequencing data analysis showed that these patients were infected with common coronavirus HCoV-OC43. These results suggest that S protein-targeted vaccine-induced antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 are not protective against seasonal coronavirus HCoV-OC43.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Vaccines , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons
5.
Commun Biol ; 5(1): 242, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751765

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has incited a global health crisis. Currently, there are limited therapeutic options for the prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infections. We evaluated the antiviral activity of sulforaphane (SFN), the principal biologically active phytochemical derived from glucoraphanin, the naturally occurring precursor present in high concentrations in cruciferous vegetables. SFN inhibited in vitro replication of six strains of SARS-CoV-2, including Delta and Omicron, as well as that of the seasonal coronavirus HCoV-OC43. Further, SFN and remdesivir interacted synergistically to inhibit coronavirus infection in vitro. Prophylactic administration of SFN to K18-hACE2 mice prior to intranasal SARS-CoV-2 infection significantly decreased the viral load in the lungs and upper respiratory tract and reduced lung injury and pulmonary pathology compared to untreated infected mice. SFN treatment diminished immune cell activation in the lungs, including significantly lower recruitment of myeloid cells and a reduction in T cell activation and cytokine production. Our results suggest that SFN should be explored as a potential agent for the prevention or treatment of coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Common Cold/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Isothiocyanates/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfoxides/therapeutic use , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Drug Synergism , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Male , Mice, Transgenic , Spleen/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vero Cells , Viral Load
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742485

ABSTRACT

The B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system are important for the control of most viral infections, including COVID-19. Identification of epitopes recognized by these cells is fundamental for understanding how the immune system detects and removes pathogens, and for antiviral vaccine design. Intriguingly, several cross-reactive T lymphocyte epitopes from SARS-CoV-2 with other betacoronaviruses responsible for the common cold have been identified. In addition, antibodies that cross-recognize the spike protein, but not the nucleoprotein (N protein), from different betacoronavirus have also been reported. Using a consensus of eight bioinformatic methods for predicting B-cell epitopes and the collection of experimentally detected epitopes for SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, we identified four surface-exposed, conserved, and hypothetical antigenic regions that are exclusive of the N protein. These regions were analyzed using ELISA assays with two cohorts: SARS-CoV-2 infected patients and pre-COVID-19 samples. Here we describe four epitopes from SARS-CoV-2 N protein that are recognized by the humoral response from multiple individuals infected with COVID-19, and are conserved in other human coronaviruses. Three of these linear surface-exposed sequences and their peptide homologs in SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-OC43 were also recognized by antibodies from pre-COVID-19 serum samples, indicating cross-reactivity of antibodies against coronavirus N proteins. Different conserved human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cross-reactive B epitopes against SARS-CoV-2 N protein are detected in a significant fraction of individuals not exposed to this pandemic virus. These results have potential clinical implications.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , Epitope Mapping/methods , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Amino Acid Sequence , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Cross Reactions/genetics , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
7.
Antiviral Res ; 200: 105278, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734184

ABSTRACT

The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, along with the likelihood that new coronavirus strains will appear in the nearby future, highlights the urgent need to develop new effective antiviral agents. In this scenario, emerging host-targeting antivirals (HTAs), which act on host-cell factors essential for viral replication, are a promising class of antiviral compounds. Here we show that a new class of HTAs targeting peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), a family of calcium-dependent enzymes catalyzing protein citrullination, is endowed with a potent inhibitory activity against human beta-coronaviruses (HCoVs). Specifically, we show that infection of human fetal lung fibroblasts with HCoV-OC43 leads to enhanced protein citrullination through transcriptional activation of PAD4, and that inhibition of PAD4-mediated citrullination with either of the two pan-PAD inhibitors Cl-A and BB-Cl or the PAD4-specific inhibitor GSK199 curbs HCoV-OC43 replication. Furthermore, we show that either Cl-A or BB-Cl treatment of African green monkey kidney Vero-E6 cells, a widely used cell system to study beta-CoV replication, potently suppresses HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2 replication. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential efficacy of PAD inhibitors, in suppressing HCoV infection, which may provide the rationale for the repurposing of this class of inhibitors for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Viruses ; 12(6)2020 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726022

ABSTRACT

There is currently debate about human coronavirus (HCoV) seasonality and pathogenicity, as epidemiological data are scarce. Here, we provide epidemiological and clinical features of HCoV patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) examined in primary care general practice. We also describe HCoV seasonality over six influenza surveillance seasons (week 40 to 15 of each season) from the period 2014/2015 to 2019/2020 in Corsica (France). A sample of patients of all ages presenting for consultation for influenza-like illness (ILI) or ARI was included by physicians of the French Sentinelles Network during this period. Nasopharyngeal samples were tested for the presence of 21 respiratory pathogens by real-time RT-PCR. Among the 1389 ILI/ARI patients, 105 were positive for at least one HCoV (7.5%). On an annual basis, HCoVs circulated from week 48 (November) to weeks 14-15 (May) and peaked in week 6 (February). Overall, among the HCoV-positive patients detected in this study, HCoV-OC43 was the most commonly detected virus, followed by HCoV-NL63, HCoV-HKU1, and HCoV-229E. The HCoV detection rates varied significantly with age (p = 0.00005), with the age group 0-14 years accounting for 28.6% (n = 30) of HCoV-positive patients. Fever and malaise were less frequent in HCoV patients than in influenza patients, while sore throat, dyspnoea, rhinorrhoea, and conjunctivitis were more associated with HCoV positivity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HCoV subtypes appear in ARI/ILI patients seen in general practice, with characteristic outbreak patterns primarily in winter. This study also identified symptoms associated with HCoVs in patients with ARI/ILI. Further studies with representative samples should be conducted to provide additional insights into the epidemiology and clinical features of HCoVs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus 229E, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/isolation & purification , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Primary Health Care , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Young Adult
9.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 18-22, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719333

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have detrimental impacts on neurological functions, and even to cause severe neurological damage. Very recently, coronaviruses (CoV), especially severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV 2 (SARS-CoV-2), exhibit neurotropic properties and may also cause neurological diseases. It is reported that CoV can be found in the brain or cerebrospinal fluid. The pathobiology of these neuroinvasive viruses is still incompletely known, and it is therefore important to explore the impact of CoV infections on the nervous system. Here, we review the research into neurological complications in CoV infections and the possible mechanisms of damage to the nervous system.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Consciousness Disorders/etiology , Consciousness Disorders/physiopathology , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus NL63, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Dysgeusia/etiology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Encephalitis/etiology , Encephalitis/physiopathology , Encephalitis, Viral/etiology , Encephalitis, Viral/physiopathology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neurotoxicity Syndromes/etiology , Neurotoxicity Syndromes/physiopathology , Neurotoxicity Syndromes/virology , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Polyneuropathies/etiology , Polyneuropathies/physiopathology , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/etiology , Seizures/physiopathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/physiopathology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/physiopathology
10.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1450-1456, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718389

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an overwhelming crisis across the world. Human Coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is a Betacoronavirus responsible mostly for mild respiratory symptoms. Since the presentations of HCoV-OC43 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) are believed to resemble a lot, the aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of HCoV-OC43 in the current pandemic and the rate of coinfection for the two viruses. One hundred and seventeen patients referred to Children's Medical Center, Tehran, Iran with respiratory symptoms were included. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods were performed for the detection of HCoV-OC43 and SARS-COV-2. Totally, 23 (20%) had a positive RT-PCR for HCoV-OC43 and 25 (21%) were positive for SARS-COV-2. Two patients (2%) had a positive PCR for both HCoV-OC43 and SARS-COV-2. The two groups showed significant differences in having contact with family members with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 (p = 0.017), fever (p = 0.02), edema (p = 0.036), vomiting (p < 0.001), abdominal complaints (p = 0.005), and myalgia (p = 0.02). The median level of lymphocyte count in patients with HCoV-OC43 was significantly lower than patients with SARS-COV-2 infection (p = 0.039). The same frequency of SARS-COV-2 and HCoV-OC43 was found in children with respiratory symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. The rate of coinfection of SARS-COV-2 with HCoV-OC43 in our study was 0.08. Further research into the cocirculation of endemic coronaviruses, such as HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV2, in different regions, is highly recommended. Attempts to determine the geographic distribution and recruit more flexible test panel designs are also highly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Iran , Male , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods
11.
Lancet Microbe ; 2(12): e666-e675, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Among the most consequential unknowns of the devastating COVID-19 pandemic are the durability of immunity and time to likely reinfection. There are limited direct data on SARS-CoV-2 long-term immune responses and reinfection. The aim of this study is to use data on the durability of immunity among evolutionarily close coronavirus relatives of SARS-CoV-2 to estimate times to reinfection by a comparative evolutionary analysis of related viruses SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, human coronavirus (HCoV)-229E, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-NL63. METHODS: We conducted phylogenetic analyses of the S, M, and ORF1b genes to reconstruct a maximum-likelihood molecular phylogeny of human-infecting coronaviruses. This phylogeny enabled comparative analyses of peak-normalised nucleocapsid protein, spike protein, and whole-virus lysate IgG antibody optical density levels, in conjunction with reinfection data on endemic human-infecting coronaviruses. We performed ancestral and descendent states analyses to estimate the expected declines in antibody levels over time, the probabilities of reinfection based on antibody level, and the anticipated times to reinfection after recovery under conditions of endemic transmission for SARS-CoV-2, as well as the other human-infecting coronaviruses. FINDINGS: We obtained antibody optical density data for six human-infecting coronaviruses, extending from 128 days to 28 years after infection between 1984 and 2020. These data provided a means to estimate profiles of the typical antibody decline and probabilities of reinfection over time under endemic conditions. Reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 under endemic conditions would likely occur between 3 months and 5·1 years after peak antibody response, with a median of 16 months. This protection is less than half the duration revealed for the endemic coronaviruses circulating among humans (5-95% quantiles 15 months to 10 years for HCoV-OC43, 31 months to 12 years for HCoV-NL63, and 16 months to 12 years for HCoV-229E). For SARS-CoV, the 5-95% quantiles were 4 months to 6 years, whereas the 95% quantiles for MERS-CoV were inconsistent by dataset. INTERPRETATION: The timeframe for reinfection is fundamental to numerous aspects of public health decision making. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, reinfection is likely to become increasingly common. Maintaining public health measures that curb transmission-including among individuals who were previously infected with SARS-CoV-2-coupled with persistent efforts to accelerate vaccination worldwide is critical to the prevention of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. FUNDING: US National Science Foundation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus NL63, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Reactions , Humans , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Reinfection/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
12.
J Photochem Photobiol B ; 227: 112378, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654818

ABSTRACT

In a recent study, we showed that pulsed blue light (PBL) inactivates as much as 52.3% of human beta coronavirus HCoV-OC43, a surrogate of SARS-CoV-2, and one of the major strains of viruses responsible for the annual epidemic of the common cold. Since curcumin and saliva are similarly antiviral and curcumin acts as blue light photosensitizer, we used Qubit fluorometry and WarmStart RT-LAMP assays to study the effect of combining 405 nm, 410 nm, 425 nm or 450 nm wavelengths of PBL with curcumin, saliva or a combination of curcumin and saliva against human beta coronavirus HCoV-OC43. The results showed that PBL, curcumin and saliva independently and collectively inactivate HCoV-OC43. Without saliva or curcumin supplementation 21.6 J/cm2 PBL reduced HCoV-OC43 RNA concentration a maximum of 32.8% (log10 = 2.13). Saliva supplementation alone inactivated the virus, reducing its RNA concentration by 61% (log10 = 2.23); with irradiation the reduction was as much as 79.1%. Curcumin supplementation alone decreased viral RNA 71.1%, and a maximum of 87.8% with irradiation. The combination of saliva and curcumin reduced viral RNA to 83.1% and decreased the RNA up to 90.2% with irradiation. The reduced levels could not be detected with qPCR. These findings show that PBL in the range of 405 nm to 450 nm wavelength is antiviral against human coronavirus HCoV-OC43, a surrogate of the COVID-19 virus. Further, it shows that with curcumin as a photosensitizer, it is possible to photodynamically inactivate the virus beyond qPCR detectable level using PBL. Since HCoV-OC43 is of the same beta coronavirus family as SARS-CoV-2, has the same genomic size, and is often used as its surrogate, these findings heighten the prospect of similarly inactivating novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/therapy , Curcumin/pharmacology , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Saliva/chemistry , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Humans , Light , Photochemical Processes , Photochemotherapy , RNA, Viral
13.
Molecules ; 27(3)2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649980

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread around the world and caused serious public health and social problems. Although several vaccines have been authorized for emergency use, new effective antiviral drugs are still needed. Some repurposed drugs including Chloroquine, Hydroxychloroquine and Remdesivir were immediately used to treat COVID-19 after the pandemic. However, the therapeutic effects of these drugs have not been fully demonstrated in clinical studies. In this paper, we found an antimalarial drug, Naphthoquine, showed good broad-spectrum anti-coronavirus activity. Naphthoquineinhibited HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro, with IC50 = 2.05 ± 1.44 µM, 5.83 ± 0.74 µM, and 2.01 ± 0.38 µM, respectively. Time-of-addition assay was also performed to explore at which stage Naphthoquine functions during SARS-CoV-2 replication. The results suggested that Naphthoquine may influence virus entry and post-entry replication. Considering the safety of Naphthoquine was even better than that of Chloroquine, we think Naphthoquine has the potential to be used as a broad-spectrum drug for coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
1-Naphthylamine/analogs & derivatives , Aminoquinolines/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , 1-Naphthylamine/pharmacology , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus NL63, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
J Med Virol ; 94(5): 2188-2200, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648458

ABSTRACT

Brilacidin, a mimetic of host defense peptides (HDPs), is currently in Phase 2 clinical trial as an antibiotic drug candidate. A recent study reported that brilacidin has antiviral activity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by inactivating the virus. In this study, we discovered an additional mechanism of action of brilacidin by targeting heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the host cell surface. Brilacidin, but not acetyl brilacidin, inhibits the entry of SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus into multiple cell lines, and heparin, an HSPG mimetic, abolishes the inhibitory activity of brilacidin on SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus cell entry. In addition, we found that brilacidin has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against multiple human coronaviruses (HCoVs) including HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, and HCoV-NL63. Mechanistic studies revealed that brilacidin has a dual antiviral mechanism of action including virucidal activity and binding to coronavirus attachment factor HSPGs on the host cell surface. Brilacidin partially loses its antiviral activity when heparin was included in the cell cultures, supporting the host-targeting mechanism. Drug combination therapy showed that brilacidin has a strong synergistic effect with remdesivir against HCoV-OC43 in cell culture. Taken together, this study provides appealing findings for the translational potential of brilacidin as a broad-spectrum antiviral for coronaviruses including SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Guanidines , Humans , Pyrimidines , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Infect Dis ; 116: 68-73, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunoglobulin products (for intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration) prepared from geographically diverse plasma pools were tested for activity against common human coronaviruses (HCoVs). Products from plasma obtained from Germany, Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, USA and Spain were tested for antibodies to common HCoVs: 229E, OC43, NL63 and HKU1. As these products are manufactured from pooled plasma from thousands of donors, the antibodies therein are representative of HCoV exposure in the population at large. METHODS: Immunoglobulin products were tested for antibodies to four common HCoVs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Neutralization assays were conducted using HCoV-229E cultured on to MRC5 cells. RESULTS: ELISAs showed that when expressed as specific activity (anti-HCoV activity/mg immunoglobulin), similar activity against the four common HCoVs was seen across the immunoglobulin products regardless of concentration or geographic origin. Highest anti-HCoV activity was seen against HCoV-229E, followed by HCoV-OC43, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1. The neutralization assays showed similar potency for two immunoglobulin products prepared by different processes. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of antibodies to common HCoVs in immunoglobulin products. These results may explain the cross-reactivity seen with pre-pandemic immunoglobulin products and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, and contribute to differences in severity of illness between patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus 229E, Human , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 168-171, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623181

ABSTRACT

HCoV-OC43 is one of the mildly pathogenic coronaviruses with high infection rates in common population. Here, 43 HCoV-OC43 related cases with pneumonia were reported, corresponding genomes of HCoV-OC43 were obtained. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete genome, orf1ab and spike genes revealed that two novel genotypes of HCoV-OC43 have emerged in China. Obvious recombinant events also can be detected in the analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of novel HCoV-OC43 genotypes. Estimated divergence time analysis indicated that the two novel genotypes had apparently independent evolutionary routes. Efforts should be conducted for further investigation of genomic diversity and evolution analysis of mildly pathogenic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Common Cold/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Genome, Viral , Genotype , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Base Sequence , Bayes Theorem , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Common Cold/pathology , Common Cold/transmission , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/classification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Monte Carlo Method , Mutation , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recombination, Genetic
17.
Cell Rep ; 37(13): 110169, 2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616407

ABSTRACT

The importance of pre-existing immune responses to seasonal endemic coronaviruses (HCoVs) for the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the course of COVID-19 is the subject of an ongoing scientific debate. Recent studies postulate that immune responses to previous HCoV infections can either have a slightly protective or no effect on SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and, consequently, be neglected for COVID-19 risk stratification. Challenging this notion, we provide evidence that pre-existing, anti-nucleocapsid antibodies against endemic α-coronaviruses and S2 domain-specific anti-spike antibodies against ß-coronavirus HCoV-OC43 are elevated in patients with COVID-19 compared to pre-pandemic donors. This finding is particularly pronounced in males and in critically ill patients. Longitudinal evaluation reveals that antibody cross-reactivity or polyclonal stimulation by SARS-CoV-2 infection are unlikely to be confounders. Thus, specific pre-existing immunity to seasonal coronaviruses may increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and predispose individuals to an adverse COVID-19 outcome, guiding risk management and supporting the development of universal coronavirus vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Cross Reactions/immunology , Female , Germany , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Seasons , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 40-49, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585824

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection is generally mild or asymptomatic in children but a biological basis for this outcome is unclear. Here we compare antibody and cellular immunity in children (aged 3-11 years) and adults. Antibody responses against spike protein were high in children and seroconversion boosted responses against seasonal Beta-coronaviruses through cross-recognition of the S2 domain. Neutralization of viral variants was comparable between children and adults. Spike-specific T cell responses were more than twice as high in children and were also detected in many seronegative children, indicating pre-existing cross-reactive responses to seasonal coronaviruses. Importantly, children retained antibody and cellular responses 6 months after infection, whereas relative waning occurred in adults. Spike-specific responses were also broadly stable beyond 12 months. Therefore, children generate robust, cross-reactive and sustained immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 with focused specificity for the spike protein. These findings provide insight into the relative clinical protection that occurs in most children and might help to guide the design of pediatric vaccination regimens.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Cross Protection/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross Reactions/immunology , Humans
19.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580427

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a huge number of deaths from 2020 to 2021; however, effective antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2 are currently under development. Recent studies have demonstrated that green tea polyphenols, particularly EGCG, inhibit coronavirus enzymes as well as coronavirus replication in vitro. Herein, we examined the inhibitory effect of green tea polyphenols on coronavirus replication in a mouse model. We used epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea polyphenols containing more than 60% catechin (GTP60) and human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) as a surrogate for SARS-CoV-2. Scanning electron microscopy analysis results showed that HCoV-OC43 infection resulted in virion particle production in infected cells. EGCG and GTP60 treatment reduced coronavirus protein and virus production in the cells. Finally, EGCG- and GTP60-fed mice exhibited reduced levels of coronavirus RNA in mouse lungs. These results demonstrate that green tea polyphenol treatment is effective in decreasing the level of coronavirus in vivo.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Tea/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Catechin/pharmacology , Catechin/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Mice , Polyphenols/chemistry , Polyphenols/therapeutic use
20.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576961

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the role of complement (C') in infections with highly prevalent circulating human coronaviruses such as OC43, a group of viruses of major public health concern. Treatment of OC43-infected human lung cells with human serum resulted in C3 deposition on their surfaces and generation of C5a, indicating robust C' activation. Real-time cell viability assays showed that in vitro C'-mediated lysis of OC43 infected cells requires C3, C5 and C6 but not C7, and was substantially delayed as compared to rapid C'-mediated killing of parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5)-infected cells. In cells co-infected with OC43 and PIV5, C'-mediated lysis was delayed, similar to OC43 infected cells alone, suggesting that OC43 infection induced dominant inhibitory signals. When OC43-infected cells were treated with human serum, their cell surfaces contained both Vitronectin (VN) and Clusterin (CLU), two host cell C' inhibitors that can alter membrane attack complex (MAC) formation and C'-mediated killing. VN and CLU were not bound to OC43-infected cells after treatment with antibody-depleted serum. Reconstitution experiments with purified IgG and VN showed that human antibodies are both necessary and sufficient for VN recruitment to OC43-infected lung cells-novel findings with implications for CoV pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/metabolism , Clusterin/metabolism , Complement Inactivator Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Lung/virology , Vitronectin/metabolism , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Survival/immunology , Complement Activation , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology
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