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1.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 168-171, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623181

ABSTRACT

HCoV-OC43 is one of the mildly pathogenic coronaviruses with high infection rates in common population. Here, 43 HCoV-OC43 related cases with pneumonia were reported, corresponding genomes of HCoV-OC43 were obtained. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete genome, orf1ab and spike genes revealed that two novel genotypes of HCoV-OC43 have emerged in China. Obvious recombinant events also can be detected in the analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of novel HCoV-OC43 genotypes. Estimated divergence time analysis indicated that the two novel genotypes had apparently independent evolutionary routes. Efforts should be conducted for further investigation of genomic diversity and evolution analysis of mildly pathogenic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Common Cold/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Genome, Viral , Genotype , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Base Sequence , Bayes Theorem , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Common Cold/pathology , Common Cold/transmission , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/classification , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Epidemiological Monitoring , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Monte Carlo Method , Mutation , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recombination, Genetic
2.
Cell Rep ; 37(13): 110169, 2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616407

ABSTRACT

The importance of pre-existing immune responses to seasonal endemic coronaviruses (HCoVs) for the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the course of COVID-19 is the subject of an ongoing scientific debate. Recent studies postulate that immune responses to previous HCoV infections can either have a slightly protective or no effect on SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and, consequently, be neglected for COVID-19 risk stratification. Challenging this notion, we provide evidence that pre-existing, anti-nucleocapsid antibodies against endemic α-coronaviruses and S2 domain-specific anti-spike antibodies against ß-coronavirus HCoV-OC43 are elevated in patients with COVID-19 compared to pre-pandemic donors. This finding is particularly pronounced in males and in critically ill patients. Longitudinal evaluation reveals that antibody cross-reactivity or polyclonal stimulation by SARS-CoV-2 infection are unlikely to be confounders. Thus, specific pre-existing immunity to seasonal coronaviruses may increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and predispose individuals to an adverse COVID-19 outcome, guiding risk management and supporting the development of universal coronavirus vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Cross Reactions/immunology , Female , Germany , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Seasons , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576961

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the role of complement (C') in infections with highly prevalent circulating human coronaviruses such as OC43, a group of viruses of major public health concern. Treatment of OC43-infected human lung cells with human serum resulted in C3 deposition on their surfaces and generation of C5a, indicating robust C' activation. Real-time cell viability assays showed that in vitro C'-mediated lysis of OC43 infected cells requires C3, C5 and C6 but not C7, and was substantially delayed as compared to rapid C'-mediated killing of parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5)-infected cells. In cells co-infected with OC43 and PIV5, C'-mediated lysis was delayed, similar to OC43 infected cells alone, suggesting that OC43 infection induced dominant inhibitory signals. When OC43-infected cells were treated with human serum, their cell surfaces contained both Vitronectin (VN) and Clusterin (CLU), two host cell C' inhibitors that can alter membrane attack complex (MAC) formation and C'-mediated killing. VN and CLU were not bound to OC43-infected cells after treatment with antibody-depleted serum. Reconstitution experiments with purified IgG and VN showed that human antibodies are both necessary and sufficient for VN recruitment to OC43-infected lung cells-novel findings with implications for CoV pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/metabolism , Clusterin/metabolism , Complement Inactivator Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Lung/virology , Vitronectin/metabolism , Cell Line , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Survival/immunology , Complement Activation , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology
4.
Virol J ; 18(1): 166, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533268

ABSTRACT

The emergence of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and more recently, the independent evolution of multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants has generated renewed interest in virus evolution and cross-species transmission. While all known human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are speculated to have originated in animals, very little is known about their evolutionary history and factors that enable some CoVs to co-exist with humans as low pathogenic and endemic infections (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1), while others, such as SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 have evolved to cause severe disease. In this review, we highlight the origins of all known HCoVs and map positively selected for mutations within HCoV proteins to discuss the evolutionary trajectory of SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, we discuss emerging mutations within SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern (VOC), along with highlighting the demonstrated or speculated impact of these mutations on virus transmission, pathogenicity, and neutralization by natural or vaccine-mediated immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/transmission , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus NL63, Human/genetics , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Humans , Immunity , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488619

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection poses a serious threat to global public health and the economy. The enzymatic product of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H), 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), was reported to have potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity. Here, we found that the combination of 25-HC with EK1 peptide, a pan-coronavirus (CoV) fusion inhibitor, showed a synergistic antiviral activity. We then used the method of 25-HC modification to design and synthesize a series of 25-HC-modified peptides and found that a 25-HC-modified EK1 peptide (EK1P4HC) was highly effective against infections caused by SARS-CoV-2, its variants of concern (VOCs), and other human CoVs, such as HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-229E. EK1P4HC could protect newborn mice from lethal HCoV-OC43 infection, suggesting that conjugation of 25-HC with a peptide-based viral inhibitor was a feasible and universal strategy to improve its antiviral activity.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Hydroxycholesterols/chemistry , Lipopeptides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Body Weight/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Synergism , Humans , Hydroxycholesterols/pharmacology , Hydroxycholesterols/therapeutic use , Lipopeptides/pharmacology , Lipopeptides/therapeutic use , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Rate , Virus Internalization/drug effects
6.
Mol Cell Proteomics ; 20: 100120, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284342

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses have become an increasing threat to global health; three highly pathogenic strains have emerged since the early 2000s, including most recently SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of coronavirus pathogenesis is needed, including how these highly virulent strains differ from those that cause milder, common-cold-like disease. While significant progress has been made in understanding how SARS-CoV-2 proteins interact with the host cell, nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has largely been omitted from the analyses. Nsp3 is a viral protease with important roles in viral protein biogenesis, replication complex formation, and modulation of host ubiquitinylation and ISGylation. Herein, we use affinity purification-mass spectrometry to study the host-viral protein-protein interactome of nsp3 from five coronavirus strains: pathogenic strains SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV; and endemic common-cold strains hCoV-229E and hCoV-OC43. We divide each nsp3 into three fragments and use tandem mass tag technology to directly compare the interactors across the five strains for each fragment. We find that few interactors are common across all variants for a particular fragment, but we identify shared patterns between select variants, such as ribosomal proteins enriched in the N-terminal fragment (nsp3.1) data set for SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV. We also identify unique biological processes enriched for individual homologs, for instance, nuclear protein import for the middle fragment of hCoV-229E, as well as ribosome biogenesis of the MERS nsp3.2 homolog. Lastly, we further investigate the interaction of the SARS-CoV-2 nsp3 N-terminal fragment with ATF6, a regulator of the unfolded protein response. We show that SARS-CoV-2 nsp3.1 directly binds to ATF6 and can suppress the ATF6 stress response. Characterizing the host interactions of nsp3 widens our understanding of how coronaviruses co-opt cellular pathways and presents new avenues for host-targeted antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Activating Transcription Factor 6/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Coronavirus 229E, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus OC43, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
7.
Infect Genet Evol ; 93: 104944, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246087

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of their primitive strains, the complexity surrounding their pathogenesis, constant genetic mutation and translation are contributing factors to the scarcity of a successful vaccine for coronaviruses till moment. Although, the recent announcement of vaccine breakthrough for COVID-19 renews the hope, however, there remains a major challenge of accessibility to urgently match the rapid global therapeutic demand for curtailing the pandemic, thereby creating an impetus for further search. The reassessment of results from a stream of experiments is of enormous importance in identifying bona fide lead-like candidates to fulfil this quest. This review comprehensively highlights the common pathomechanisms and pharmacological targets of HCoV-OC43, SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, and potent therapeutic potentials from basic and clinical experimental investigations. The implicated targets for the prevention and treatment include the viral proteases (Mpro, PLpro, 3CLpro), viral structural proteins (S- and N-proteins), non-structural proteins (nsp 3, 8, 10, 14, 16), accessory protein (ns12.9), viroporins (3a, E, 8a), enzymes (RdRp, TMPRSS2, ADP-ribosyltransferase, MTase, 2'-O-MTase, TATase, furin, cathepsin, deamidated human triosephosphate isomerase), kinases (MAPK, ERK, PI3K, mTOR, AKT, Abl2), interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) and the human host receptor, ACE2. Notably among the 109 overviewed inhibitors include quercetin, eriodictyol, baicalin, luteolin, melatonin, resveratrol and berberine from natural products, GC373, NP164 and HR2P-M2 from peptides, 5F9, m336 and MERS-GD27 from specific human antibodies, imatinib, remdesivir, ivermectin, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, nafamostat, interferon-ß and HCQ from repurposing libraries, some iron chelators and traditional medicines. This review represents a model for further translational studies for effective anti-CoV therapeutic designs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
8.
Mol Cell ; 81(13): 2838-2850.e6, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202181

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is an RNA virus whose success as a pathogen relies on its abilities to repurpose host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and to evade antiviral RBPs. To uncover the SARS-CoV-2 RNA interactome, we here develop a robust ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture protocol and identify 109 host factors that directly bind to SARS-CoV-2 RNAs. Applying RNP capture on another coronavirus, HCoV-OC43, revealed evolutionarily conserved interactions between coronaviral RNAs and host proteins. Transcriptome analyses and knockdown experiments delineated 17 antiviral RBPs, including ZC3HAV1, TRIM25, PARP12, and SHFL, and 8 proviral RBPs, such as EIF3D and CSDE1, which are responsible for co-opting multiple steps of the mRNA life cycle. This also led to the identification of LARP1, a downstream target of the mTOR signaling pathway, as an antiviral host factor that interacts with the SARS-CoV-2 RNAs. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive list of RBPs regulating coronaviral replication and opens new avenues for therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Autoantigens/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Ribonucleoproteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/genetics , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Protein Binding/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Transcriptome/genetics , Tripartite Motif Proteins/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Virus Replication/genetics
9.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 1002-1007, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196430

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viral infection can cause severe disease and hospitalization, especially among children, the elderly, and patients with comorbidities. In Brazil, the official surveillance system of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) investigates influenza A (IAV) and B (IBV) viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (HAdV), and parainfluenza viruses (hPIV 1-3). In Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, many fatalities associated with SARI between 2013 and 2017 occurred among patients without underlying diseases and for whom the causative agent had not been identified using official protocols. This cross-sectional study analyzed the presence of coronaviruses (HCoV), bocavirus (HBoV), metapneumovirus (hMPV), and rhinovirus in patients who died of SARI despite not having comorbidities, and that were negative for IAV, IBV, RSV, HAdV, and hPIV. Nasopharyngeal aspirates/swabs from patients were used for nucleic acid extraction. The presence of HCoVs OC43, HKU1, NL63, and 229E; HBoV; hMPV; and rhinovirus was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Clinical data were also analyzed. Between 2013 and 2017, 16 225 cases of SARI were reported in RS; 9.8% of the patients died; 20% of all fatal cases were patients without comorbidities and for whom no pathogen was detected using standard protocols. Analysis of 271 of these cases identified HCoV in nine cases; HBoV, hMPV, and rhinovirus were detected in 3, 3, and 10 cases, respectively. Of note, patients infected with HCoV were adults. Results reinforce the importance of including coronaviruses in diagnostic panels used by official surveillance systems because besides their pandemic potential, endemic HCoVs are associated to severe disease in healthy adults.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Brazil/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Common Cold/epidemiology , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Rhinovirus/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
10.
Lett Appl Microbiol ; 72(6): 725-729, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096912

ABSTRACT

There does not appear to be any studies in the published literature on the stability of SARS-CoV-2 in climbing chalk powder (magnesium carbonate and/or calcium carbonate), which has been hypothesized to pose a potential risk of fomite transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) within climbing gyms. The aim of this study was to determine the infectivity of a model human coronavirus HCoV-OC43 in the presence of climbing chalk powder on a dry plastic surface. The stability of HCoV-OC43 on a plastic surface dusted with climbing chalk powders (magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate or a blended chalk) was determined by titration on BHK-21 fibroblast cells. No chalk and no virus controls were included. HCoV-OC43 was stable on the plastic surface for 48 h. The stability of HCoV-OC43 was significantly (P ≤ 0·05) reduced in the presence of magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate and the chalk blend; the infectivity was reduced by ≥2·29 log10 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50 ) immediately upon on contact and by ≥2·46 log10 TCID50 within 1 h of contact. These findings suggest that the infectivity of coronaviruses is reduced by climbing chalk, limiting the risk of potential fomite transmission.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Animals , Calcium Carbonate , Cell Line , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Cricetinae , Fibroblasts/drug effects , Fibroblasts/virology , Fomites , Powders
11.
ACS Infect Dis ; 6(12): 3174-3189, 2020 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954597

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses (hCoVs) have become a threat to global health and society, as evident from the SARS outbreak in 2002 caused by SARS-CoV-1 and the most recent COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. Despite a high sequence similarity between SARS-CoV-1 and -2, each strain has a distinctive virulence. A better understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms mediating changes in virulence is needed. Here, we profile the virus-host protein-protein interactions of two hCoV nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are critical for virus replication. We use tandem mass tag-multiplexed quantitative proteomics to sensitively compare and contrast the interactomes of nsp2 and nsp4 from three betacoronavirus strains: SARS-CoV-1, SARS-CoV-2, and hCoV-OC43-an endemic strain associated with the common cold. This approach enables the identification of both unique and shared host cell protein binding partners and the ability to further compare the enrichment of common interactions across homologues from related strains. We identify common nsp2 interactors involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ signaling and mitochondria biogenesis. We also identify nsp4 interactors unique to each strain, such as E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes for SARS-CoV-1 and ER homeostasis factors for SARS-CoV-2. Common nsp4 interactors include N-linked glycosylation machinery, unfolded protein response associated proteins, and antiviral innate immune signaling factors. Both nsp2 and nsp4 interactors are strongly enriched in proteins localized at mitochondria-associated ER membranes suggesting a new functional role for modulating host processes, such as calcium homeostasis, at these organelle contact sites. Our results shed light on the role these hCoV proteins play in the infection cycle, as well as host factors that may mediate the divergent pathogenesis of OC43 from SARS strains. Our mass spectrometry workflow enables rapid and robust comparisons of multiple bait proteins, which can be applied to additional viral proteins. Furthermore, the identified common interactions may present new targets for exploration by host-directed antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mitochondria/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Transfection , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virulence/genetics , Virus Replication/genetics
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