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1.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(6): 465-466, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401973
5.
Plast Surg Nurs ; 41(1): 27-33, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099659

ABSTRACT

The readability of letters sent to patients plays a pivotal role in facilitating joint decision making and positive health outcomes. Guidance suggests that all correspondence should be directed to patients. Covid-19 led to an increase in direct-to-patient communication. This study aims to determine the quantity and quality of plastic surgery clinic letters sent to patients before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. A total of 127 pre-Covid clinic letters from November to December 2019 and 103 peri-Covid clinic letters from April to May 2020 were identified and assessed for readability. Text was analyzed using a standardized set of commonly used readability formulae, including SMOG, Flesch Reading Ease, and the Coleman-Liao Index. A total of 100 pre-Covid and 58 peri-Covid letters were suitable for inclusion. Median results for formulae that output a U.S. grade score ranged between 9 and 12.9 for letters written prior to Covid-19 and 9 and 13.2 for those written during Covid-19. Eight percent of letters were sent to patients pre-Covid, increasing to 28% during the pandemic. Letters sent to patients had a median grade score of between 8 and 12 prior to Covid-19 and 8 and 10.6 during Covid-19. Letters sent to clinicians ranged between 9 and 13 and 9 and 13.3, respectively. Outpatient plastic surgery letters are written at a readability level too high to facilitate understanding among the general population. The increase in direct-to-patient contact during the Covid-19 outbreak has not led to a significant improvement in the readability of clinic letters. The authors suggest an increase in letter standardization and raising awareness of readability when writing clinic letters.


Subject(s)
Comprehension , Correspondence as Topic , Health Literacy , Patient Participation/methods , Professional-Patient Relations , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Writing/standards , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/standards , Humans , United Kingdom
6.
Appl Psychol Health Well Being ; 13(2): 406-418, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087971

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is spreading across the world, threatening not only physical health but also psychological well-being. We reasoned that a broadened temporal perspective may attenuate current mental distress and tested a letter-writing manipulation designed to connect people to their post-COVID-19 future selves. We conducted an online experiment with 738 Japanese participants recruited from two common survey platforms. They were randomly assigned to either send a letter to their future self (letter-to-future) condition, send a letter to present self from the perspective of future self (letter-from-future) condition, or a control condition. Participants in both letter-writing conditions showed immediate decrease in negative affect and increase in positive affect relative to the control condition. These effects were mediated by temporal distancing from the current situation. These findings suggest that taking a broader temporal perspective can be achieved by letter writing with a future self and may offer an effective means of regulating negative affect in a stressful present time such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Affect , COVID-19/psychology , Correspondence as Topic , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Emotional Adjustment , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Psychological Distress , Time Factors , Young Adult
7.
Ther Innov Regul Sci ; 55(1): 239-244, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created a global setting of clinical crisis and human anxiety. Without available safe and effective vaccines and cures, an unscrupulous marketplace has emerged selling COVID-19 quackery (fraudulent misrepresentation of preventions and treatments). METHODS: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Warning Letters issued from March 2020 to July 2020 were analyzed for themes pertaining to unapproved, adulterated, and misbranded COVID-19 products. RESULTS: During this period, the FDA issued 3,139 Warning Letters of which 98 (3.14%) of these were focused on COVID-19-related drugs, devices, biologics, and dietary supplements (products and ingredients). Specifically, these Warning Letters revealed regulatory nonconformities involving 40 identified herbs, 22 minerals/compounds, 6 devices and biologicals, and 3 vitamins. Products included hand sanitizers; COVID-19 antibody test kits; herbal teas and tinctures; nasal gel; toothpaste; and 1 vaccine. Nine Warning Letters were issued for products being sold via the Amazon online shopping platform. CONCLUSION: A small percentage of FDA Warning Letters recently have been focused on COVID-19. These Letters expose the blatant and potentially harmful quackery of vendors across the world who prioritize financial gain over clinical beneficence. Patient history-taking should include queries about non-traditional and unapproved products to identify, document, and report potentially harmful quackery. FDA Warning Letters are a component of meaningful corrective action; however, greater effort in spreading awareness of such misrepresented, unapproved, and adulterated products is needed to deter purchases of such products.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fraud , Quackery , SARS-CoV-2 , United States Food and Drug Administration , Correspondence as Topic , Databases, Factual , Government Regulation , Humans , United States
8.
Am J Med ; 133(10): 1223-1226.e6, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638322

ABSTRACT

This statement was released in June 2020 by the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to provide guidance for the 2020-2021 residency application cycle in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. While many of the recommendations are specific to this cycle, others, such as the Department Summary Letter of Evaluation, are meant to be an enduring change to the internal medicine residency application process. AAIM realizes that some schools may not yet have the tools or resources to implement the template fully this cycle and look toward collaboration within the internal medicine education community to facilitate adoption in the cycles to come.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Correspondence as Topic , Internal Medicine/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Job Application , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans
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