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1.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2288, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384306

ABSTRACT

SARS Coronavirus-2 is one of the most widespread viruses globally during the 21st century, whose severity and ability to cause severe pneumonia and death vary. We performed a comprehensive systematic review of all studies that met our standardised criteria and then extracted data on the age, symptoms, and different treatments of Covid-19 patients and the prognosis of this disease during follow-up. Cases in this study were divided according to severity and death status and meta-analysed separately using raw mean and single proportion methods. We included 171 complete studies including 62,909 confirmed cases of Covid-19, of which 148 studies were meta-analysed. Symptoms clearly emerged in an escalating manner from mild-moderate symptoms, pneumonia, severe-critical to the group of non-survivors. Hypertension (Pooled proportion (PP): 0.48 [95% Confident interval (CI): 0.35-0.61]), diabetes (PP: 0.23 [95% CI: 0.16-0.33]) and smoking (PP: 0.12 [95% CI: 0.03-0.38]) were highest regarding pre-infection comorbidities in the non-survivor group. While acute respiratory distress syndrome (PP: 0.49 [95% CI: 0.29-0.78]), (PP: 0.63 [95% CI: 0.34-0.97]) remained one of the most common complications in the severe and death group respectively. Bilateral ground-glass opacification (PP: 0.68 [95% CI: 0.59-0.75]) was the most visible radiological image. The mortality rates estimated (PP: 0.11 [95% CI: 0.06-0.19]), (PP: 0.03 [95% CI: 0.01-0.05]), and (PP: 0.01 [95% CI: 0-0.3]) in severe-critical, pneumonia and mild-moderate groups respectively. This study can serve as a high evidence guideline for different clinical presentations of Covid-19, graded from mild to severe, and for special forms like pneumonia and death groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cough/pathology , Dyspnea/pathology , Fatigue/pathology , Fever/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/mortality , Cough/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/mortality , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue/drug therapy , Fatigue/mortality , Fatigue/virology , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/mortality , Fever/virology , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/physiopathology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Smoking/physiopathology , Survival Analysis
2.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256429, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367707

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic since its outbreak in Wuhan, China. It is an urgent task to prevent and treat COVID-19 effectively early. In China's experience combating the COVID-19 pandemic, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has played an indispensable role. A large number of epidemiological investigations have shown that mild to moderate COVID-19 accounts for the largest proportion of cases. It is of great importance to treat such COVID-19 cases, which can help control epidemic progression. Many trials have shown that CHM combined with conventional therapy in the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 was superior to conventional therapy alone. This review was designed to evaluate the add-on effect of CHM in the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19. METHODS: Eight electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Clinical Trials.gov website, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP), Wanfang Database and China Biology Medicine (CBM) were searched from December 2019 to March 2021 without language restrictions. Two reviewers searched and selected studies, and extracted data according to inclusion and exclusion criteria independently. Cochrane Risk of Bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the included RCTs. Review Manager 5.3.0 software was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Twelve eligible RCTs including 1393 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Our meta-analyses found that lung CT parameters [RR = 1.26, 95% CI (1.15, 1.38), P<0.00001] and the clinical cure rate [RR = 1.26, 95%CI (1.16, 1.38), P<0.00001] of CHM combined with conventional therapy in the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 were better than those of conventional therapy. The rate of conversion to severe cases [RR = 0.48, 95%CI (0.32, 0.73), P = 0.0005], TCM symptom score of fever [MD = -0.62, 95%CI (-0.79, -0.45), P<0.00001], cough cases [RR = 1.43, 95%CI (1.16, 1.75), P = 0.0006], TCM symptom score of cough[MD = -1.07, 95%CI (-1.29, -0.85), P<0.00001], TCM symptom score of fatigue[MD = -0.66, 95%CI (-1.05, -0.28), P = 0.0007], and CRP[MD = -5.46, 95%CI (-8.19, -2.72), P<0.0001] of combination therapy was significantly lower than that of conventional therapy. The WBC count was significantly higher than that of conventional therapy[MD = 0.38, 95%CI (0.31, 0.44), P<0.00001]. Our meta-analysis results were robust through sensitivity analysis. CONCLUSION: Chinese herbal medicine combined with conventional therapy may be effective and safe in the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19. More high-quality RCTs are needed in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/etiology , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Diarrhea/chemically induced , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Nausea/chemically induced , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome , Vomiting/chemically induced
4.
Int J Nanomedicine ; 16: 4063-4072, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ivermectin is an FDA-approved broad-spectrum anti-parasitic agent that has been shown to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of ivermectin mucoadhesive nanosuspension intranasal spray in treatment of patients with mild COVID-19. METHODS: This clinical trial included 114 patients diagnosed as mild COVID-19. Patients were divided randomly into two age and sex-matched groups; group A comprising 57 patients received ivermectin nanosuspension nasal spray twice daily plus the Egyptian protocol of treatment for mild COVID-19 and group B comprising 57 patients received the Egyptian protocol for mild COVID-19 only. Evaluation of the patients was performed depending on improvement of presenting manifestations, negativity of two consecutive pharyngeal swabs for the COVID-19 nucleic acid via rRT-PCR and assessments of hematological and biochemical parameters in the form of complete blood counts, C-reactive protein, serum ferritin and d-dimer which were performed at presentation and 7 days later. RESULTS: Of the included patients confirmed with mild COVID-19, 82 were males (71.9%) and 32 females (28.1%) with mean age 45.1 ± 18.9. In group A, 54 patients (94.7%) achieved 2 consecutive negative PCR nasopharyngeal swabs in comparison to 43 patients (75.4%) in group B with P = 0.004. The durations of fever, cough, dyspnea and anosmia were significantly shorter in group A than group B, without significant difference regarding the duration of gastrointestinal symptoms. Duration taken for nasopharyngeal swab to be negative was significantly shorter in group A than in group B (8.3± 2.8 days versus 12.9 ± 4.3 days; P = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Local use of ivermectin mucoadhesive nanosuspension nasal spray is safe and effective in treatment of patients with mild COVID-19 with rapid viral clearance and shortening the anosmia duration. CLINICALTRIALSGOV IDENTIFIER: NCT04716569; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04716569.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Ivermectin/therapeutic use , Respiratory Tract Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Egypt , Female , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Ivermectin/administration & dosage , Ivermectin/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Nanostructures/administration & dosage , Nanostructures/chemistry , Nasal Sprays , Nasopharynx/virology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Diseases/etiology , Respiratory Tract Diseases/virology , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 1230-1235, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254219

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Covid-19 is a contagious disease, and it is characterised by different symptoms such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Rising concerns about Covid-19 have severely affected the healthcare system in all countries as the Covid-19 outbreak has developed at a rapid rate all around the globe. Intriguing, a clinically used drug, acetazolamide (a specific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, CA, EC 4.2.1.1), is used to treat high-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), showing a high degree of clinical similarities with the pulmonary disease caused by Covid-19. In this context, this preliminary study aims to provide insights into some factors affecting the Covid-19 patients, such as hypoxaemia, hypoxia as well as the blood CA activity. We hypothesise that patients with Covid-19 problems could show a dysregulated acid-base status influenced by CA activity. These preliminary results suggest that the use of CA inhibitors as a pharmacological treatment for Covid-19 may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Acetazolamide/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Carbonic Anhydrases/blood , Acid-Base Equilibrium/drug effects , Altitude Sickness/blood , Altitude Sickness/drug therapy , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Bicarbonates/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Cough/blood , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/pathology , Cough/virology , Drug Repositioning , Dyspnea/blood , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/pathology , Dyspnea/virology , Fever/blood , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/pathology , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hypertension, Pulmonary/blood , Hypertension, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Oximetry , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Phytother Res ; 35(4): 1925-1938, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173847

ABSTRACT

Arisen in China, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-II) is a novel coronavirus that has been expanding fast worldwide. Till now, no definite remedial drug or vaccine has been identified for COVID-19 treatment. Still, for a majority of infected patients, supportive therapy is the cornerstone of the management plan. To the importance of managing the COVID-19 pandemic, this article proposed to collecting capable medicinal plants and bioactive components in both treat and supportive therapy of this novel viral infection. Clinical points in the pathogenesis, symptoms, and complications of COVID-19 were considered. The effective plants and bioactives that may play a role in supportive therapy/management of COVID-19 were searched, collected through the "Scopus" database and listed in three sections. Numerous medicinal plants such as Citrus Spp., Camellia sinensis, and Glycyrrhiza glabra can interference with COVID-19 pathogenesis via inhibition of virus replication and entry to its host cells. Also, some anti-inflammatory herbal medicine such as Andrographis paniculata, Citrus spp., and Cuminum cyminum can relieve fever and cough in COVID-19 patients. Medicinal plants such as G. glabra, Thymus vulgaris, Allium sativum, Althea officinalis, and Panax ginseng may modulate the immune system and possess prevention and supportive therapy. However, more clinical data are required to confirm these hypotheses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Phytotherapy , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(2): e210369, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084243

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is limited evidence regarding early treatment of novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection to mitigate symptom progression. Objective: To examine whether high-dose zinc and/or high-dose ascorbic acid reduce the severity or duration of symptoms compared with usual care among ambulatory patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter, single health system randomized clinical factorial open-label trial enrolled 214 adult patients with a diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed with a polymerase chain reaction assay who received outpatient care in sites in Ohio and Florida. The trial was conducted from April 27, 2020, to October 14, 2020. Intervention: Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1:1 allocation ratio to receive either 10 days of zinc gluconate (50 mg), ascorbic acid (8000 mg), both agents, or standard of care. Outcomes: The primary end point was the number of days required to reach a 50% reduction in symptoms, including severity of fever, cough, shortness of breath, and fatigue (rated on a 4-point scale for each symptom). Secondary end points included days required to reach a total symptom severity score of 0, cumulative severity score at day 5, hospitalizations, deaths, adjunctive prescribed medications, and adverse effects of the study supplements. Results: A total of 214 patients were randomized, with a mean (SD) age of 45.2 (14.6) years and 132 (61.7%) women. The study was stopped for a low conditional power for benefit with no significant difference among the 4 groups for the primary end point. Patients who received usual care without supplementation achieved a 50% reduction in symptoms at a mean (SD) of 6.7 (4.4) days compared with 5.5 (3.7) days for the ascorbic acid group, 5.9 (4.9) days for the zinc gluconate group, and 5.5 (3.4) days for the group receiving both (overall P = .45). There was no significant difference in secondary outcomes among the treatment groups. Conclusions and Relevance: In this randomized clinical trial of ambulatory patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection, treatment with high-dose zinc gluconate, ascorbic acid, or a combination of the 2 supplements did not significantly decrease the duration of symptoms compared with standard of care. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04342728.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Zinc/therapeutic use , Adult , Ambulatory Care , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/drug therapy , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/etiology , Gluconates/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Standard of Care , Trace Elements/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
8.
Z Rheumatol ; 80(3): 270-273, 2021 Apr.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070835

ABSTRACT

The article describes the case of a hospitalized 58-year-old female patient with a chronic dry cough and increased inflammation values. Before hospital admission, the presence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was excluded by a normal chest X­ray and two negative PCR tests on throat swabs. On admission the only symptom was a dry cough with clinically inconspicuous auscultation findings. The laboratory investigations revealed anemia and increased inflammation parameters, e.g. C­reactive protein (CRP) 92.4 mg/l and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) 102 mm/h (according to Westergren). A large vessel vasculitis was demonstrated on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). After the diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis, treatment with an oral glucocorticoid and subcutaneous methotrexate (MTX) was initiated, with good clinical and laboratory parameter responses. Dry cough has been described in rare cases in the literature as the first sign of large vessel vasculitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Giant Cell Arteritis , Blood Sedimentation , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 154-159, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059492

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 becomes a global pandemic, many researchers have a concern about the long COVID-19 complications. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a persistent, debilitating, and unexplained fatigue disorder. We investigated psychological morbidities such as CFS and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors of COVID-19 over 6 months. All COVID-19 survivors from the university-affiliated hospital of Tehran, Iran, were assessed 6 months after infection onset by a previously validated questionnaire based on the Fukuda guidelines for CFS/EM and DSM-5 Checklist for PTSD (The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 or PCL-5) to determine the presence of stress disorder and chronic fatigue problems. A total of 120 patients were enrolled. The prevalence rate of fatigue symptoms was 17.5%. Twelve (10%) screened positive for chronic idiopathic fatigue (CIF), 6 (5%) for CFS-like with insufficient fatigue syndrome (CFSWIFS), and 3 (2.5%) for CFS. The mean total scores in PCL-5 were 9.27 ± 10.76 (range:0-44), and the prevalence rate of PTSD was 5.8%. There was no significant association after adjusting between CFS and PTSD, gender, comorbidities, and chloroquine phosphate administration. The obtained data revealed the prevalence of CFS among patients with COVID-19, which is almost similar to CFS prevalence in the general population. Moreover, PTSD in patients with COVID-19 is not associated with the increased risk of CFS. Our study suggested that medical institutions should pay attention to the psychological consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cough/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Dyspnea/psychology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/psychology , Fever/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cough/complications , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Dementia/complications , Dementia/drug therapy , Dementia/virology , Drug Combinations , Dyspnea/complications , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/drug therapy , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Female , Fever/complications , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , Research Design , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/drug therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Survivors/psychology
10.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 26-34, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046668

ABSTRACT

Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome is a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms ranging from full combination of these three neurological findings to varying degrees of isolated individual sign. Since the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), neurological symptoms, syndromes, and complications associated with this multi-organ viral infection have been reported and the various aspects of neurological involvement are increasingly uncovered. As a neuro-inflammatory disorder, one would expect to observe opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome after a prevalent viral infection in a pandemic scale, as it has been the case for many other neuro-inflammatory syndromes. We report seven cases of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome presumably parainfectious in nature and discuss their phenomenology, their possible pathophysiological relationship to COVID-19, and diagnostic and treatment strategy in each case. Finally, we review the relevant data in the literature regarding the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and possible similar cases associated with COVID-19 and its diagnostic importance for clinicians in various fields of medicine encountering COVID-19 patients and its complications.


Subject(s)
Ataxia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Ataxia/diagnostic imaging , Ataxia/drug therapy , Ataxia/etiology , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clonazepam/therapeutic use , Cough/diagnostic imaging , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/diagnostic imaging , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/etiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Levetiracetam/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/diagnostic imaging , Myalgia/drug therapy , Myalgia/etiology , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/drug therapy , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/etiology , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Valproic Acid/therapeutic use
11.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 12-25, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996484

ABSTRACT

With the growing number of COVID-19 cases in recent times. significant set of patients with extra pulmonary symptoms has been reported worldwide. Here we venture out to summarize the clinical profile, investigations, and radiological findings among patients with SARS-CoV-2-associated meningoencephalitis in the form of a systemic review. This review was carried out based on the existing PRISMA (Preferred Report for Systematic Review and Meta analyses) consensus statement. The data for this review was collected from four databases: Pubmed/Medline, NIH Litcovid, Embase, and Cochrane library and Preprint servers up till 30 June 2020. Search strategy comprised of a range of keywords from relevant medical subject headings which includes "SARS-COV-2," "COVID-19," and "meningoencephalitis." All peer reviewed, case-control, case report, pre print articles satisfying our inclusion criteria were involved in the study. Quantitative data was expressed in mean ± SD, while the qualitative date in percentages. Paired t test was used for analysing the data based on differences between mean and respective values with a p < 0.05 considered to be statistically significant. A total of 61 cases were included from 25 studies after screening from databases and preprint servers, out of which 54 of them had completed investigation profile and were included in the final analysis. Clinical, laboratory findings, neuroimaging abnormalities, and EEG findings were analyzed in detail. This present review summarizes the available evidences related to the occurrence of meningoencephalitis in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Meningoencephalitis/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Confusion/diagnostic imaging , Confusion/drug therapy , Confusion/physiopathology , Confusion/virology , Cough/diagnostic imaging , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Dyspnea/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/virology , Electroencephalography , Fatigue/diagnostic imaging , Fatigue/drug therapy , Fatigue/virology , Female , Fever/diagnostic imaging , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Male , Meningoencephalitis/diagnostic imaging , Meningoencephalitis/drug therapy , Meningoencephalitis/virology , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(48): e23261, 2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the effectiveness and safety of Traditional Chinese medicine formula Xiaoqinglong decoction for cough caused by COVID-19 is the main purpose of this systematic review protocol. METHODS: The following electronic databases will be searched from their respective inception dates to October 1, 2020: PubMed, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Embase, WorldSciNet, Ovid, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, the Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP), the Wanfang Database, and the China Biology Medicine Disc. All published randomized controlled trials in English or Chinese related to Traditional Chinese medicine formula Xiaoqinglong decoction for cough caused by COVID-19 will be included. The primary outcome is the time and rate of appearance of coughing. The secondary outcomes are the length of hospital stay. Two reviewers will conduct the study selection, data extraction, and assessment independently. The assessment of risk of bias and data synthesis will be conducted with RevMan V.5.2. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide an evidence to judge whether traditional Chinese medicine formula Xiaoqinglong decoction is an effective intervention for patients with cough caused by COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Formal ethical approval is not necessary as the data cannot be individualized. The results of this protocol will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal or presented at relevant conferences. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020202079.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cough/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/administration & dosage , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 103(4): 1593-1596, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890582

ABSTRACT

Coinfection of SARS-CoV-2/Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in patients with HIV/AIDS has not been previously reported. Here, we present two cases of coinfection of SARS-CoV-2 and MTB in patients with HIV. The first case is a 39-year-old patient who was admitted with a 7-day history of fever, myalgia, headache, and cough. The second patient is a 43-year-old man who had a 1-month history of cough with hemoptoic sputum, evolving to mild respiratory distress in the last 7 days. Both patients already had pulmonary tuberculosis and subsequently developed SARS-CoV-2 infection during the 2020 pandemic. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatment may have been a factor in the clinical worsening of the patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Cough/microbiology , HIV Infections/microbiology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Adult , Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/immunology , Cough/virology , HIV/pathogenicity , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV Infections/virology , Humans , Male , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/pathogenicity , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/virology
14.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 55(9): 2419-2426, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A retrospective study was conducted to summarize the clinical information of childhood infections during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) epidemic. METHODS: Children with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 11 hospitals from three provinces of South China were included in the study. Clinical information was collected and compared with children and adults infected by SARS-CoV-2 in Wuhan. RESULTS: In total, 52 children were enrolled, including 28 boys. The median age was 9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 4-12); 44.2% cases were of clustered occurrences, 40.4% patients had fever, 48.1% had cough, and 46.2% had a high lymphocyte count. No abnormalities were found in the liver and kidney function. Also, 82.7% of patients received antiviral therapy, but such therapy did not shorten the time to virus negativity or hospital stay (P = .082). The time to virus negativity was 12.0 days (IQR, 8.0-16.8) and hospital stay was 14.5 days (IQR, 10.3-17.9). Compared with reports in Wuhan, there were more acute upper respiratory tract infection (AURTI) and fewer pneumonia cases (P = .000). Compared with the non-ICU adult COVID-19 in Wuhan, these children's diseases were relatively mild, with fewer complications. CONCLUSIONS: Children with SARS-CoV-2 infection had a mild fever, lymphocyte elevation was more common than reduction, and antiviral treatment had no obvious effect. The overall clinical manifestations were mild, and the prognosis was good.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/immunology , Epidemics , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/immunology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Length of Stay , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Med Virol ; 92(11): 2702-2708, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574725

ABSTRACT

This study aims to explore the clinical effect of Arbidol (ARB) combined with adjuvant therapy on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The study included 62 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the First Hospital of Jiaxing from January to March 2020, and all patients were divided into the test group and the control group according to whether they received ARB during hospitalization. Various indexes in the two groups before and after treatment were observed and recorded, including fever, cough, hypodynamia, nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, diarrhea, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), blood routine indexes, blood biochemical indexes, time to achieve negative virus nucleic acid, and so on. The fever and cough in the test group were relieved markedly faster than those in the control group (P < .05); there was no obvious difference between the two groups concerning the percentage of patients with abnormal CRP, PCT, blood routine indexes, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (P > .05); the time for two consecutive negative nucleic acid tests in the test group were shorter than that in the control group; the hospitalization period of the patients in the test group and control group were (16.5 ± 7.14) days and (18.55 ± 7.52) days, respectively. ARB combined with adjuvant therapy might be able to relieve the fever of COVID-19 sufferers faster and accelerate the cure time to some degree, hence it's recommended for further research clinically.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Indoles/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Cough/drug therapy , Female , Fever/drug therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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