Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 108
Filter
1.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2581, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090780

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic for coronavirus 19. Typical symptoms were fever, cough, asthenia, dyspnea, and muscle pain. Pulmonary and central nervous system compromise presented challenging characteristics for healthcare physicians. The objectives of this study were to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-COV-2 infection survivors in a region of Argentina and to determine differences between gender, age groups, year of infection, and evolution time since diagnosis. Methods: A descriptive and analytical cross-sectional observational study was carried out. A self-administered questionnaire was applied, which was available between August and December 2021. Results: Among 1868 individuals included, the mean age was 39.4 ± 13.9 years, and 72.8% were female. Arterial hypertension was the most frequent comorbidity (11.7%). The majority were outpatients (81.9%). The most frequent presentation symptoms at all ages were asthenia (83.7%), fever (54.9%), headache (60.8%), anosmia (64.8%), ageusia (53.2%), cough (54.4%) and myalgias (53.7%). For the 18 to 29 years old age group, the most prevalent presentation symptoms were: headache (69.4%), anosmia (69.1%), ageusia (60.2%), odynophagia (45%), and rhinitis/nasal congestion (46.9%). In the 30 to 64 years old age group, there was a higher prevalence of myalgias (55.8%), arthralgias (41%), and concentration/memory disorder (28.3%). Male showed higher prevalence of fever (64.9% versus 51.1%; p < 0.001) and pneumonia (23.5% versus 13.4%; p < 0.001). After 12 weeks from diagnosis, 38.1% of patients persisted with asthenia, 23.6% with anosmia/dysosmia, and 21.2% with concentration/memory disorders. Conclusions: Systemic symptoms were common to all age groups with coronavirus 19 disease; however, younger, and intermediate age groups presented a higher prevalence of central nervous system symptoms such as anosmia and cognitive disorders, respectively. Symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis reached slightly more than 10% of the participants.


Introducción: En marzo de 2020 la enfermedad por coronavirus 19 fue declarada pandemia por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Los síntomas más comunes fueron fiebre, tos, astenia, disnea y dolor muscular. Los compromisos pulmonar y del sistema nervioso central presentaron características desafiantes para los médicos asistenciales. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer las características epidemiológicas y clínicas de sobrevivientes a infección por SARS-CoV-2 en una región de Argentina, y determinar las diferencias entre género, grupos etarias, año de contagio, tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo y analítico de corte transversal. Se aplicó un cuestionario auto administrado, que estuvo disponible entre agosto y diciembre de 2021. Resultados: La media de edad fue de 39,4 ± 13,9 años, el 72,8% fueron mujeres. La comorbilidad más frecuente fue hipertensión arterial (11,7%). La mayoría de los pacientes fueron ambulatorios (81,9%). Los síntomas de presentación más frecuentes a cualquier edad, fueron astenia (83,7%), fiebre (54,9%), cefalea (60,8%), anosmia (64,8%), ageusia (53,2%), tos (54,4%) y mialgias (53,7%). Para el grupo de 18 a 29 años los síntomas de presentación más prevalentes fueron cefalea (69,4%), anosmia 69,1%), ageusia (60,2%), odinofagia (45%) y rinitis/congestión nasal (46,9%). En el grupo de 30 a 64 años se observó mayor prevalencia de mialgias (55,8%), artralgias (41%), falta de concentración/memoria (28,3%). Los hombres mostraron más prevalencia de fiebre (64,9% versus 51,1%; p < 0,001) y neumonía (23,5% versus 13,4%; p < 0,001). Luego de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico 38,1% de los pacientes persistían con astenia, 23,6% con anosmia/disosmia y 21,2% con trastornos de concentración/memoria. Conclusiones: La enfermedad por coronavirus 19 presenta un patrón de síntomas sistémicos común a todos los grupos etarios. No obstante, los grupos más jóvenes presentan más prevalencia de síntomas de afección del sistema nervioso central como la anosmia y los grupos intermedios, mayor prevalencia de trastornos cognitivos. Los síntomas más allá de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico alcanzaron a algo más del 10% de los participantes.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Asthenia , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Survivors
2.
BMC Pediatr ; 22(1): 613, 2022 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several individual studies from specific countries have reported rising numbers of pediatric COVID-19 cases with inconsistent reports on the clinical symptoms including respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms as well as diverse reports on the mean age and household exposure in children. The epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in children are not fully understood, hence, comprehensive meta-analyses are needed to provide a better understanding of these characteristics. METHODS: This review was conducted in Medline, Scopus, Cochrane library, Embase, Web of Science, and published reports on COVID-19 in children. Data were extracted by two independent researchers and a third researcher resolved disputes. STATA software and the random-effect model were used in the synthesis of our data. For each model, the heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the Q Cochrane test. Heterogeneity and publication bias were calculated using the I2 statistic and Egger's/Begg's tests. RESULTS: The qualitative systematic review was performed on 32 articles. Furthermore, the meta-analysis estimated an overall rate of involvement at 12% (95% CI: 9-15%) among children, with an I2 of 98.36%. The proportion of household exposure was calculated to be 50.99% (95% CI: 20.80%-80.80%) and the proportion of admitted cases was calculated to be 45% (95% CI: 24%-67%). Additionally, the prevalence of cough, fatigue, fever and dyspnea was calculated to be 25% (95% CI: 0.16-0.36), 9% (95% CI: 0.03-0.18), 33% (95% CI: 0.21-0.47) and 9% (95% CI: 0.04-0.15), respectively. It is estimated that 4% (95% CI: 1-8%) of cases required intensive care unit admission. CONCLUSIONS: The pediatric clinical picture of COVID-19 is not simply a classic respiratory infection, but unusual presentations have been reported. Given the high incidence of household transmission and atypical clinical presentation in children, we strongly recommend their inclusion in research and population-based preventive measures like vaccination as well as clinical trials to ensure efficacy, safety, and tolerability in this age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Fever/complications , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Fatigue/etiology
3.
Viruses ; 14(8)2022 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987987

ABSTRACT

Despite recovering from the acute phase of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), many patients report continuing symptoms that most commonly include fatigue, cough, neurologic problems, hair loss, headache, and musculoskeletal pain, a condition termed long-COVID syndrome. Neither its etiopathogenesis, nor its clinical presentation or risk factors are fully understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the most common symptoms of long-COVID among patients from the STOP COVID registry of the PoLoCOV study, and to search for risk factors for development of the syndrome. The registry includes patients who presented to the medical center for persistent clinical symptoms following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The analysis included data from initial presentation and at three-month follow-up. Of the 2218 patients, 1569 (70.7%) reported having at least one symptom classified as long-COVID syndrome three months after recovery from the initial SARS-CoV-2 infection. The most common symptoms included chronic fatigue (35.6%\), cough (23.0%), and a set of neurological symptoms referred to as brain fog (12.1%). Risk factors for developing long-COVID syndrome included female gender (odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence intervals [CI] [1.19-1.84]), severe COVID-19 (OR: 1.56, CI: 1.00-2.42), dyspnea (OR: 1.31, CI: 1.02-1.69), and chest pain (OR: 1.48, CI: 1.14-1.92). Long-COVID syndrome represents a significant clinical and social problem. The most common clinical manifestations are chronic fatigue, cough, and brain fog. Given the still-limited knowledge of long-COVID syndrome, further research and observation are needed to better understand the mechanisms and risk factors of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/virology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/epidemiology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Female , Humans , Mental Fatigue/epidemiology , Mental Fatigue/virology , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(5): e060511, 2022 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932757

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the percentage of people in the UK with cough, fever or loss of taste or smell who have not had a positive COVID-19 test result who had been to work, to shops, socialised or provided care to a vulnerable person in the 10 days after developing symptoms. To investigate whether these rates differed according to the type of symptom, what the participant thought the cause of their symptoms was and whether they had taken a COVID-19 test. DESIGN: Four online cross-sectional surveys using non-probability quota sampling method (n=8547). SETTING: Data were collected across the UK from 20 September to 3 November 2021, via a market research company. PARTICIPANTS: Aged over 16 years living in the UK. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Out-of-home activity. RESULTS: 498 participants reported one or more symptoms and had not had a positive COVID-19 test result. Within that group, about half of employed participants had attended work while symptomatic (51.2%-56.3% depending on the symptom, 95% CIs 42.2% to 65.6%). Rates of other contact behaviours ranged from 31.4% (caring for a vulnerable person after developing a cough: 95% CI 24.3% to 38.4%) to 61.5% (shopping for groceries or pharmacy after developing a cough: 95% CI 54.1% to 68.9%). There were no differences according to type of symptom experienced or what the participant felt might be the cause. People who had taken a COVID-19 test were less likely to go out shopping for non-essentials than people who had not taken a test. CONCLUSION: Many people in the UK with symptoms of an infectious disease were not following government advice to stay at home if they believed they had an infectious illness. Reducing these rates may require a shift in our national attitude to the acceptability of people attending work with infectious illnesses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Presenteeism , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin (Engl Ed) ; 40(9): 499-502, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whooping cough has had an increased incidence and severity specially in infants and maternal immunization has been implemented as a prevention strategy. COVID-19 pandemic seems to decrease the incidence of other respiratory diseases. METHODS: Retrospective study from 2012 to 2021 to assess the influence of pertussis maternal immunizations and the first year of COVID-19 pandemic in the cases of whooping cough. RESULTS: 960 suspected cases from primary care and hospital, with 130 cases (104 children and 26 adults) being diagnosed of whooping cough. In the post-vaccination period, a reduction in the cases and severity in infants up to 6 months old was observed as well as in the pertussis diagnosis in adult women. There were no whooping cough cases during the COVID-19 period. CONCLUSIONS: Both the pertussis vaccination in pregnancy and the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic have decreased the number of pertussis cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Whooping Cough , Infant , Child , Adult , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Pertussis Vaccine , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cough/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics
6.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(7): 588-603, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This meta-analysis provides a quantitative measure of the otorhinolaryngological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 in children. METHODS: A structured literature review was carried out using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Central, employing pertinent search terms. The statistical analysis was performed using Stata version 14.2 software, and the analysed data were expressed as the pooled prevalence of the symptoms with 95 per cent confidence intervals. RESULTS: The commonest symptoms noted were cough (38 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval = 33-42; I2 = 97.5 per cent)), sore throat (12 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval =10-14; I2 = 93.7 per cent)), and nasal discharge (15 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval = 12-19; I2 = 96.9 per cent)). Anosmia and taste disturbances showed a pooled prevalence of 8 per cent each. Hearing loss, vertigo and hoarseness were rarely reported. CONCLUSION: Cough, sore throat and nasal discharge were the commonest otorhinolaryngological symptoms in paediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019. Compared with adults, anosmia and taste disturbances were infrequently reported in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharyngitis , Adult , Anosmia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Humans , Pharyngitis/epidemiology
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(7): 1131-1139, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1852989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) testing policies for symptomatic children attending US schools or daycare vary, and whether isolated symptoms should prompt testing is unclear. We evaluated children presenting for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing to determine if the likelihood of having a positive SARS-CoV-2 test differed between participants with 1 symptom vs ≥2 symptoms, and to examine the predictive capability of isolated symptoms. METHODS: Participants aged <18 years presenting for clinical SARS-CoV-2 molecular testing in 6 sites in urban/suburban/rural Georgia (July-October, 2021; Delta variant predominant) were queried about individual symptoms. Participants were classified into 3 groups: asymptomatic, 1 symptom only, or ≥2 symptoms. SARS-CoV-2 test results and clinical characteristics of the 3 groups were compared. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPVs), and negative predictive values (NPVs) for isolated symptoms were calculated by fitting a saturated Poisson model. RESULTS: Of 602 participants, 21.8% tested positive and 48.7% had a known or suspected close contact. Children reporting 1 symptom (n = 82; odds ratio [OR], 6.00 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.70-13.33]) and children reporting ≥2 symptoms (n = 365; OR, 5.25 [95% CI, 2.66-10.38]) were significantly more likely to have a positive COVID-19 test than asymptomatic children (n = 155), but they were not significantly different from each other (OR, 0.88 [95% CI, .52-1.49]). Sensitivity and PPV were highest for isolated fever (33% and 57%, respectively), cough (25% and 32%), and sore throat (21% and 45%); headache had low sensitivity (8%) but higher PPV (33%). Sensitivity and PPV of isolated congestion/rhinorrhea were 8% and 9%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: With high Delta variant prevalence, children with isolated symptoms were as likely as those with multiple symptoms to test positive for COVID-19. Isolated fever, cough, sore throat, or headache, but not congestion/rhinorrhea, offered the highest predictive value.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharyngitis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/epidemiology , Headache , Humans , Rhinorrhea , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
8.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 239: 113651, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850969

ABSTRACT

Air pollution, to which children are more susceptible than adults, can promote airway inflammation, potentially exaggerating the effects of respiratory viral infection. This study examined the association between the clinical manifestation of COVID-19 in unvaccinated pediatric patients hospitalized in Poland (n = 766) and levels of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) within a week before hospitalization. Children aged ≤ 12 years exposed to mean and max 24 h B(a)P levels > 1 ng/m3 revealed higher odds of cough, dyspnea, fever, and increased concentrations of inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, white blood cell count). In older patients (13-17 years), elevated mean 24 h B(a)P levels increased odds of dyspnea, fever, and diarrhea, and higher concentrations of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin. Exposure to max 24 h PM2.5 levels > 20 µg/m3 was associated with higher odds of cough, increased concentrations of C-reactive protein (group ≤12 years), and increased procalcitonin concentration (groups ≤12 years and 13-17 years). In both age groups, length of stay was extended in patients exposed to elevated levels of max 24 h PM2.5, mean and max 24 h B(a)P. This study suggests that worse air quality, particularly reflected in increased B(a)P levels, might affect the clinical course of COVID-19 in pediatric patients and adds to the disease burden during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , COVID-19 , Particulate Matter , Adolescent , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Air Pollution/analysis , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Environmental Exposure/analysis , Humans , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Particulate Matter/analysis , Procalcitonin
9.
Immun Inflamm Dis ; 10(6): e632, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850064

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To analyze the epidemic characteristics of the human rhinovirus (HRV) outbreaks in Guangzhou, China, in 2020. METHODS: Descriptive epidemiological methods were used to analyze the HRV-related outbreaks in Guangzhou, 2020. RESULTS: Seventeen outbreaks were reported in 2020 during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Guangzhou, a total of 465 patients (290 males and 175 females) were enrolled, with a median age of 10. A total of 223 (47.96%) had been tested for HRV, 89 (39.91%) of which were positive; 344/465 (73.98%) had a fever, 138/465 (29.68%) had a runny nose, 139/465 (29.89%) had a sore throat, 86/465 (18.49%) had a cough, 41/465 (8.82%) had a headache, and 37/465 (7.96%) had a sneeze. Patients at age of 13-15 had the highest rate of sore throat and runny nose, patients aged 11-12 had the highest rate of sneezing, and patients at age of 12-14 had the highest rate of positive rate. Patients tested positive had a higher rate of fever (χ2 = 11.271, p = .001), cough (χ2 = 6.987, p = .008), runny nose (χ2 = 7.980, p = .005), and sneeze (χ2 = 4.676, p = .031). CONCLUSION: The HRV was restored during the fighting of the COVID-19 pandemic. The conventional COVID-19 control measures were not effective enough in preventing rhinovirus. More appropriate control measures should be used to control HRV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharyngitis , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pharyngitis/epidemiology , Rhinorrhea , Rhinovirus
10.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268241, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846935

ABSTRACT

We determined the prevalence and epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in Jakarta and neighboring areas, Indonesia from March 2020 to February 2021, based on nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swab specimens that were tested at the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Jakarta. NP/OP swab specimens were collected from COVID-19 suspects or individuals in contact tracing programs from primary healthcare centers (PHC) and hospitals. The specimens were screened for the SARS-CoV-2 by qRT-PCR. Demography data and clinical symptoms were collected using national standardized laboratory form. Of 64,364 specimens, 10,130 (15.7%) were confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2, with the peak prevalence of infection in March 2020 (26.3%) follow by in January 2021 (23.9%) and February 2021 (21.8%). We found that the positivity rate of the specimens from Jakarta, West Java, and Banten was 16.3%, 13.3%, and 16.8%, respectively. Positivity rate was higher in specimens from hospitals (16.9%) than PHC (9.4%). Of the positive specimens, 29.6% were from individuals aged >60 years old, followed by individuals aged 41-60 years old (24.2%). Among symptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2, the most common symptoms were cough, fever, and a combination of both cough & fever. In conclusion, this study illustrates the prevalence and epidemiological characteristics from one COVID-19 diagnostic center in Jakarta and neighbouring areas in Indonesia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(7): 1918-1930, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults represent a disproportionate share of severe COVID-19 presentations and fatalities, but we have limited understanding of the differences in presentation by age and the association between less typical emergency department (ED) presentations and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used the RECOVER Network registry, a research collaboration of 86 EDs in 27 U.S. states. We focused on encounters with a positive nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2, and described their demographics, clinical presentation, and outcomes. Sequential multivariable logistic regressions examined the strength of association between age cohort and outcomes. RESULTS: Of 4536 encounters, median patient age was 55 years, 49% were women, and 34% were non-Hispanic Black persons. Cough was the most common presenting complaint across age groups (18-64, 65-74, and 75+): 71%, 67%, and 59%, respectively (p < 0.001). Neurological symptoms, particularly altered mental status, were more common in older adults (2%, 11%, 26%; p < 0.001). Patients 75+ had the greatest odds of ED index visit admission of all age groups (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.66; 95% CI 5.23-8.56), 30-day hospitalization (aOR 7.44; 95% CI 5.63-9.99), and severe COVID-19 (aOR 4.26; 95% CI 3.45-5.27). Compared to individuals with alternate presentations and adjusting for age, patients with typical symptoms (fever, cough and/or shortness of breath) had similar odds of ED index visit admission (aOR 1.01; 95% CI 0.81-1.24), potentially higher odds of 30-day hospitalization (aOR 1.23; 95% CI 1.00-1.53), and greater odds of severe COVID-19 (aOR 1.46; 95% CI 1.12-1.90). CONCLUSIONS: Older patients with COVID-19 are more likely to have presentations without the most common symptoms. However, alternate presentations of COVID-19 in older ED patients are not associated with greater odds of mechanical ventilation and/or death. Our data highlights the importance of a liberal COVID-19 testing strategy among older ED patients to facilitate accurate diagnoses and timely treatment and prophylaxis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Cough/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260416, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793553

ABSTRACT

This study determined the association between respiratory symptoms and death from respiratory causes over a period of 45 years. In four cohorts of random samples of Norwegian populations with 103,881 participants, 43,731 persons had died per 31 December 2016. In total, 5,949 (14%) had died from respiratory diseases; 2,442 (41%) from lung cancer, 1,717 (29%) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 1,348 (23%) pneumonia, 119 (2%) asthma, 147 (2%) interstitial lung disease and 176 (3%) other pulmonary diseases. Compared with persons without respiratory symptoms the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for lung cancer deaths increased with score of breathlessness on effort and cough and phlegm, being 2.6 (95% CI 2.1-3.2) for breathlessness score 3 and 2.1 (95% CI 1.7-2.5) for cough and phlegm score 5. The HR of COPD death was 6.4 (95% CI 5.4-7.7) for breathlessness score 3 and 3.0 (2.4-3.6) for cough and phlegm score 5. Attacks of breathlessness and wheeze score 2 had a HR of 1.6 (1.4-1.9) for COPD death. The risk of pneumonia deaths increased also with higher breathlessness on effort score, but not with higher cough and phlegm score, except for score 2 with HR 1.5 (1.2-1.8). In this study with >2.4 million person-years at risk, a positive association was observed between scores of respiratory symptoms and deaths due to COPD and lung cancer. Respiratory symptoms are thus important risk factors, which should be followed thoroughly by health care practitioners for the benefit of public health.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Respiration Disorders/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Female , Forced Expiratory Volume , Humans , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Respiration Disorders/epidemiology , Respiratory Sounds , Risk Factors , Young Adult
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e051534, 2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745694

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Although the transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in winter is thought to increase through viral droplets when coughing, current epidemiological data in this regard are limited. SETTING: Using the national epidemiological surveillance data in the autumn and winter seasons in Hokkaido, Japan, between February 2020 and February 2021, we analysed the relationship between case increase ratio and prevalence rate of coughing in patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in two age groups (0-40s and 50-100s) with concomitant air temperature and humidity. PARTICIPANTS: The 7893 cases of symptomatic PCR-positive patients consisted of 5361 cases in the young age group and 2532 cases in the older age group. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Pearson's correlation analysis and regression models were used to assess the relationships. Sex-adjusted OR of having cough in the young and old age groups in the autumn and winter seasons was calculated using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The monthly prevalence rate of coughing in the young age group was negatively correlated with temperature (r=-0.77, p<0.05), and in the old age group it was negatively correlated with humidity (r=-0.71, p<0.05). Quadratic regression models were fitted for the relationship between cold temperatures and rate of coughing rate in the young age group and case increase ratios. The sex-adjusted OR of having a cough in the young age group in winter was 1.18 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.31) as compared with autumn. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest increased rate of coughing contributes to the epidemic of SARS-CoV-2 in the winter. An effective control with a focus on these trends should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cold Temperature , Cough/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology
14.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 244, 2022 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: Respiratory viruses are the main triggers of asthma. Coronavirus is shown to contribute to respiratory tract infections that can lead to prolonged cough and asthma. OBJECTIVES: Present study aimed to determine the risk of developing Persistent cough and asthma-like symptoms in hospitalized children due to COVID-19. METHODS: This prospective study was carried out in a tertiary referral center. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 69 hospitalized pediatric patients admitted with COVID-19 were observed from February 2020 to January 2021. Clinical and laboratory data were recorded, and after discharge, patients were followed and visited for cough and asthma evaluation one, 2 and 6 months later. Patients with asthma-like diagnoses in follow up defined as asthma-like groups, and patients without any sign of asthma were categorized as the non-asthma group. Asthma-like co-morbids and risk factors were evaluated and compared between the two groups. RESULTS: In follow-up, most of the COVID-19 hospitalized patients (N = 42) (58.5%) were not affected by asthma-like symptoms. 60.9% of the COVID-19 patients were male. The asthma-like group cases had a significantly familial history of asthma (63.0%), past medical history of asthma (33.3%), and Allergic rhinitis (85.2%). Rates of signs and symptoms during hospitalization were significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 and past medical history of asthma. CONCLUSIONS: We found an asthma-like prevalence of 41.5% in the cohort of COVID-19 hospitalized children. Family history of asthma and previous history of asthma and allergic rhinitis are risk factors for asthma-like after COVID-19 hospitalization. COVID-19 presentations are more severe in the asthma-like group.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Asthma/complications , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 64: 119-125, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730026

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Cough is part of the daily life of patients with Cystic fibrosis (CF) and its most common symptom. This study explored the experiences of adolescents with CF in Iran during the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to their cough. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this qualitative study, we conducted 32 semi-structured interviews with 21 adolescents with CF. We analyzed the data thematically. RESULTS: We identified three main themes among adolescents with CF in relation to coughing: 1. Cough is a permanent companion; 2. Coughing raises fear of double stigma; 3. Patients' individualized coping strategies to deal with coughing. Participants complained that cough interrupted daily tasks and sleep, drew unwanted attention in public places, and elicited questions about whether they were COVID-19 patients or substance users-both highly stigmatized identities. CONCLUSION: Although coughing is a protective mechanism for CF patients, frequent coughing often causes major challenges, particularly during the COVID pandemic, when people were acutely sensitive and aware about coughing. During the COVID-19 pandemic, in addition to taking care of themselves and managing the disease, CF patients therefore had to also overcome issues related to social stigma and isolation. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Healthcare workers play an important role in increasing public awareness about CF and its symptoms, including cough. During the pandemic, healthcare workers can help reduce the stigma of coughing through public education. Healthcare workers can actively communicate with patients to identify severe and ineffective cases of cough due to exacerbation of the disease and refer them to a specialist.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Dreams , Humans , Pandemics , Social Stigma
17.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2373, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684110

ABSTRACT

Prior work has shown the utility of using Internet searches to track the incidence of different respiratory illnesses. Similarly, people who suffer from COVID-19 may query for their symptoms prior to accessing the medical system (or in lieu of it). To assist in the UK government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic we analyzed searches for relevant symptoms on the Bing web search engine from users in England to identify areas of the country where unexpected rises in relevant symptom searches occurred. These were reported weekly to the UK Health Security Agency to assist in their monitoring of the pandemic. Our analysis shows that searches for "fever" and "cough" were the most correlated with future case counts during the initial stages of the pandemic, with searches preceding case counts by up to 21 days. Unexpected rises in search patterns were predictive of anomalous rises in future case counts within a week, reaching an Area Under Curve of 0.82 during the initial phase of the pandemic, and later reducing due to changes in symptom presentation. Thus, analysis of regional searches for symptoms can provide an early indicator (of more than one week) of increases in COVID-19 case counts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Hotspot , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , Cough/epidemiology , England/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Humans
18.
Med Pr ; 72(6): 711-720, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609128

ABSTRACT

"Long-COVID" is described as long-term effects of SARS­ CoV­2 infection that last >4 weeks after the acutephase of infection. The aim of this narrative reviews to evaluate the frequency of occurrence of 3 symptoms often observed in Long-COVID, i.e., chronic fatigue, shortness of breath and cough, and whether comorbidities such as diabetes and arterial hypertension increase the risk of complications after a history of SARS­ CoV­2 infection. The method of narrative review was used in this paper. PubMed (May 31, 2021) search was performed to retrieve articles concerning the occurrence of long COVID-19 chronic fatigue, dyspnoea and chronic cough. Studies in which the observation period was <30 days and the average age of subjects exceeded 60 years, as well as studies with no information on the methodology used, in particular without the method of recruiting people for the study, were excluded. Populations with a high frequency of diabetes were defined as the prevalence >10%, and in the case of arterial hypertension >40%. The average frequency of diabetes <10%, hypertension 40%. It can be concluded that in the period of >30 days after discharge from the hospital, in populations with a high incidence of diabetes and hypertension, the incidence of chronic fatigue and cough was higher than in the other analyzed groups. Symptoms of dyspnea were most frequently reported in populations with high rates of diabetes, but at the same time in the average percentage of people with arterial hypertension. Persistent symptoms specific to "Long-COVID" can significantly reduce the ability to perform work. In this situation, check-ups performed before returning to work after long-term leave tape on a new dimension. Med Pr. 2021;72(6):711-20.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Epidemiologic Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(5): 254-260, 2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542928

ABSTRACT

Post COVID-19 sequelae are a constellation of symptoms often reported after recovering from COVID-19. There is a need to better understand the clinical spectrum and long-term course of this clinical entity. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features and risk factors of post COVID-19 sequelae in the North Indian population. This prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary healthcare centre in Northern India between October 2020 and February 2021. Patients aged >18 years with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were recruited after at least two weeks of diagnosis, and details were captured. A total of 1234 patients were recruited and followed up for a median duration of 91 days (IQR: 45-181 days). Among them, 495 (40.1%) had persistent symptoms post-discharge or recovery. In 223 (18.1%) patients, the symptoms resolved within four weeks; 150 (12.1%) patients had symptoms till 12 weeks, and 122 (9.9%) patients had symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis/symptom-onset of COVID-19. Most common symptoms included myalgia (10.9%), fatigue (5.5%), shortness of breath (6.1%), cough (2.1%), insomnia (1.4%), mood disturbances (0.48%) and anxiety (0.6%). Patients who were hospitalized were more likely to report fatigue as a feature of long COVID. Hypothyroidism (OR: 4.13, 95% CI: 2.2-7.6, p-value < 0.001) and hypoxia (SpO2 ≤ 93%) (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.4, p-value 0.012) were identified as risk factors for long COVID sequelae. In conclusion, long COVID symptoms were common (22%), and 9.9% had the post COVID-19 syndrome. Myalgias, fatigue and dyspnoea were common symptoms. Patients with hypothyroidism and hypoxia during acute illness were at higher risk of long COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Young Adult
20.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258649, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528716

ABSTRACT

Pandemic scenarios like SARS-Cov-2 require rapid information aggregation. In the age of eHealth and data-driven medicine, publicly available symptom tracking tools offer efficient and scalable means of collecting and analyzing large amounts of data. As a result, information gains can be communicated to front-line providers. We have developed such an application in less than a month and reached more than 500 thousand users within 48 hours. The dataset contains information on basic epidemiological parameters, symptoms, risk factors and details on previous exposure to a COVID-19 patient. Exploratory Data Analysis revealed different symptoms reported by users with confirmed contacts vs. no confirmed contacts. The symptom combination of anosmia, cough and fatigue was the most important feature to differentiate the groups, while single symptoms such as anosmia, cough or fatigue alone were not sufficient. A linear regression model from the literature using the same symptom combination as features was applied on all data. Predictions matched the regional distribution of confirmed cases closely across Germany, while also indicating that the number of cases in northern federal states might be higher than officially reported. In conclusion, we report that symptom combinations anosmia, fatigue and cough are most likely to indicate an acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Datasets as Topic , Fatigue/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL