Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 143
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 891611, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875441

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a pandemic that has significantly impacted healthcare systems at a global level. Health care facilities in Nepal, as in other low- and middle-income countries, have limited resources for the treatment and management of COVID-19 patients. Only critical cases are admitted to the hospital resulting in most patients in home isolation. Methods: Himalaya Home Care (HHC) was initiated to monitor and provide counseling to home isolated COVID-19 patients for disease prevention, control, and treatment. Counselors included one physician and four nurses. Lists of patients were obtained from district and municipal health facilities. HHC counselors called patients to provide basic counseling services. A follow-up check-in phone call was conducted 10 days later. During this second call, patients were asked about their perceptions of the HHC program. Project objects were: (1) To support treatment of home isolated persons with mild to moderate COVID-19, decrease burden of hospitalizations, and decrease risks for disease transmission; and, (2) To improve the health status of marginalized, remote, and vulnerable populations in Nepal during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Data from 5823 and 3988 patients from May 2021-February 2022 were entered in initial and follow-up forms on a REDCap database. The majority of patients who received counseling were satisfied. At follow-up, 98.4% of respondents reported that HHC prevented hospitalization, 76.5% reported they could manage their symptoms at home, and 69.5% reported that counseling helped to limit the spread of COVID-19 in their household. Conclusions: Telehealth can be an essential strategy for providing services while keeping patients and health providers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , COVID-19/epidemiology , Counseling , Humans , Nepal/epidemiology , Pandemics
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e061084, 2022 04 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854363

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Youth mental health is a global issue, with 75% of many serious mental health difficulties emerging before the age of 25. An increase in the popularity of online counselling for young people's mental health has been seen in recent years, due to their accessibility, cost-effectiveness and reduced stigmatising effects. Online synchronous chat counselling consists of real-time, text-based, one-to-one chats with a mental health professional and/or trained volunteer. Literature to date examining the effectiveness of these interventions has been limited, and little is known about their design features, their acceptance, effectiveness and the therapeutic processes that contribute to their working. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A mixed-methods systematic review of the literature will be conducted. PsycINFO MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science and relevant grey literature will be searched for peer-reviewed, English language studies between January 1995 and June 2021. Backward and forward reference checking will be conducted. Quality of included articles will be examined using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and a combination of the TIDieR checklist and a prepopulated data table will be used for extraction. A mixed methods review adopting a convergent-integrated design will be employed. Quantitative data will be transformed and analysed simultaneously alongside qualitative data using narrative synthesis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The research does not require ethical approval. Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, academic conference presentations, academic social media and invited workshops, webinars and seminars. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021256016.


Subject(s)
Counseling , Adolescent , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Young Adult
3.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 124, 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Being in the frontline of the battle against COVID-19, nurses need to be capable of stress management to maintain their physical and psychological well-being in the face of a variety of stressors. The present study aims to explore the challenges, strategies, and outcomes of stress management in nurses who face and provide care to COVID-19 patients. METHODS: The present study is a qualitative descriptive work that was conducted in teaching hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from June 2020 to March 2021. Sixteen nurses who were in practice in units assigned to COVID-19 patients were selected via purposeful sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured, individual interviews conducted online. The collected data were analyzed using MAXQDA 10 according to the conventional content analysis method suggested by Graneheim and Lundman. RESULTS: The data collected in the interviews resulted in 14 subcategories under 4 main categories: providing care with uncertainty and anxiety, facing psychological and mental tension, creating a context for support, and experiencing personal-professional growth. CONCLUSIONS: The nurses caring for COVID-19 patients needed the support of their authorities and families to stress management. Providing a supportive environment through crisis management training, providing adequate equipment and manpower, motivating nurses to achieve psychological growth during the pandemic can help them manage stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Counseling , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267458, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817498

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine healthcare workers (HCWs) utilisation of formal and informal psychological support resources in the workplace during the first and third waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ireland. METHODS: A convergent mixed methods approach was undertaken. Four hundred and thirty HCWs in the Mid West and South of Ireland responded to an online survey in terms of their use of psychological support resources during Wave 1 (April/May 2020) of COVID-19. Thirty-nine HCWs undertook in depth interviews at Wave 3 (January/February 2021), and a further quantitative survey was distributed and completed by 278 HCWs at this time. Quantitative data arising at Wave 1 and Wave 3, were synthesised with Qualitative data collected at Wave 3. A Pillar Integration Process (PIP) was utilised in the analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data. RESULTS: Five pillars were identified from the integration of results. These were: a) the primacy of peer support, b) the importance of psychologically informed management, c) a need to develop the organisational well-being ethos, d) support for all HCWs, and e) HCWs ideas for developing the well-being path. These pillars encapsulated a strong emphasis on collegial support, an emphasis on the need to support managers, a questioning of the current supports provided within the healthcare organisations and critical reflections on what HCWs viewed as most helpful for their future support needs. CONCLUSIONS: HCWs who utilised supportive resources indicated 'in house' supports, primarily collegial resources, were the most frequently used and perceived as most helpful. While formal psychological supports were important, the mechanism by which such psychological support is made available, through utilising peer support structures and moving towards psychologically informed supervisors and workplaces is likely to be more sustainable and perceived more positively by HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , COVID-19/epidemiology , Counseling , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics
6.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 36(3): 128-138, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795011

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief stress management workshop on nursing students' perceived stress and resilience. Students who received the stress management intervention during orientation had significantly higher resilience scores and lower stress scores 1 year later during COVID-19 than the comparison group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Nursing , Counseling , Humans
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 842904, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776051

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 that broke out at the end of 2019 continues to spread globally, with frequent occurrence of variant disease strains, thus epidemic prevention and control become a kind of routine job. At present, due to the prevention and control measures such as maintaining social distance and community blockades, there is a boom in material purchases in many places, which not only seriously endangers social order and public environmental safety, but also easily leads to the interruption of the supply chain and the shortage of social materials. This article aims to study the intervention methods to curb the spread and spread of panic buying behavior. Firstly, through crawler technology and LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation) topic model, this article analyzes the intervention measures taken by various social forces in China to curb the spread of panic buying, and summarizes the multi-channel intervention measures including online and offline forms. Secondly, through the multi-Agent Monte Carlo method, the targeted intervention mechanism is supplemented in each propagation link of the panic buying propagation model, and a new social intervention model of panic buying under sudden epidemic is constructed. Then, through MATLAB modeling and simulation, the main factors affecting panic buying intervention are discussed. The simulation results show that: (1) The single plan with the best intervention effect is the supply monitoring. While the official response can play an immediate inhibitory effect, but it is affected by credibility and timeliness. The intervention effect of psychological counseling is limited, and it generally needs to be used in combination with other measures. (2) The combination strategy with the best intervention effect is "supply monitoring + official response + psychological counseling," and the worst is "information review and guidance + psychological counseling." Supply monitoring is a key measure to curb panic buying. At the same time, "information review and guidance" will have a certain counter-effect in the combined strategy. Finally, the effectiveness and universality of the proposed model are verified by examples of China and Britain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Consumer Behavior , Counseling , Humans
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 728612, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775855

ABSTRACT

Background: Training programs must be evaluated to understand whether the training was successful at enabling staff to implement a program with fidelity. This is especially important when the training has been translated to a new context. The aim of this community case study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the in-person Small Steps for Big Changes training for fitness facility staff using the 4-level Kirkpatrick training evaluation model. Methods: Eight staff were trained to deliver the motivational interviewing-informed Small Steps for Big Changes program for individuals at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Between August 2019 and March 2020, 32 clients enrolled in the program and were allocated to one of the eight staff. The Kirkpatrick 4-level training evaluation model was used to guide this research. Level one assessed staff satisfaction to the training on a 5-point scale. Level two assessed staff program knowledge and motivational interviewing knowledge/skills. Level three assessed staff behaviors by examining their use of motivational interviewing with each client. Level four assessed training outcomes using clients' perceived satisfaction with their staff and basic psychological needs support both on 7-point scales. Results: Staff were satisfied with the training (M = 4.43; SD = 0.45; range = 3.86-4.71). All learning measures demonstrated high post-training scores that were retained at implementation follow-up. Staff used motivational interviewing skills in practice and delivered the program at a client-centered level (≥6; M = 6.34; SD = 0.83; range = 3.75-7.80). Overall, clients perceived staff supported their basic psychological needs (M = 6.55; SD = 0.64; range = 6.17-6.72) and reported high staff satisfaction scores (M = 6.88; SD = 0.33; range = 6-7). Conclusion: The Small Steps for Big Changes training was successful and fitness facility staff delivered a motivational interviewing-informed program. While not all staff operated at a client-centered level, clients perceived their basic psychological needs to be supported. Findings support the training for future scale-up sites. Community fitness staff represent a feasible resource through which to run evidence-based counseling programs.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Motivational Interviewing , Counseling , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Exercise , Humans
9.
J Physiother ; 68(2): 83-85, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768359
10.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 76(2): 150-151, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765381

ABSTRACT

In this article, the author describes two ways that can be done during this coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis, namely through GUIDANCE and COUNSELING. The author freely translates that GUIDANCE as "God, You, and I Dance" and COUNSELING as "Communicate yourself in God". In the middle of the COVID-19 crisis, this article offers new insights into the search for meaning and a long-term purpose in life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Counselors , Pastoral Care , Counseling , Humans , Spirituality
11.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69(7): e29686, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763274

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an effective strategy to prevent serious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is important for oncology patients. mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines are contraindicated in those with a history of severe or immediate allergy to any vaccine component, including polyethylene glycol (PEG)2000. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma receive asparaginase conjugated to PEG5000 (PEG-ASNase) and those with PEG-ASNase-associated hypersensitivity may be unnecessarily excluded from receiving mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. We, therefore, surveyed oncologists on COVID-19 vaccine counseling practice and vaccination outcomes in COVID-19 vaccination-eligible patients and show safe receipt of mRNA vaccines despite PEG-ASNase hypersensitivity.


Subject(s)
Asparaginase , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Drug Hypersensitivity , Polyethylene Glycols , Asparaginase/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Counseling , Drug Hypersensitivity/etiology , Humans , Oncologists , Polyethylene Glycols/adverse effects , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
13.
Nurse Educ Today ; 112: 105330, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Smoking is an important modifiable risk factor of morbidities and mortality. Although healthcare professionals play an important role in smoking cessation, their adoption of such practices is relatively low because of inadequate training. To address this issue, we incorporated a service-learning model to operate the Youth Quitline. Undergraduate nursing students were trained and received supervision while delivering smoking cessation counseling through the Youth Quitline as their clinical placement. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of the placement by assessing students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control. DESIGN: One-group pretest-posttest design. SETTING: Youth Quitline. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 61 third-year students in a mental health nursing program. METHODS: Students were required to complete 80 h at the Youth Quitline. The 80 h were divided into 20 sessions; students used four sessions to approach and recruit youth smokers in the community, then provided them with telephone counseling for the rest of the time. Prior to the placement, students attended a 2-day workshop. The outcomes were changes in students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control 3 months after the placement compared with baseline. RESULTS: From January-June 2021, students conducted 105 outreach activities to identify 3142 smokers in the community, and provided telephone counseling for 336 smokers via Youth Quitline. Compared with baseline, significant improvements were observed in students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical placement improved students' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding smoking cessation and tobacco control, enhancing their competency in providing support to assist smokers to quit in their future practice. Incorporating the service-learning model in existing community-based services can provide additional venues for nursing students to practice. This is particularly important because many venues have restricted access during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Smoking Cessation , Students, Nursing , Adolescent , Counseling , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Smoking Cessation/psychology
14.
Patient Educ Couns ; 105(7): 2607-2610, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720719

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic catalyzed the relaxation of regulations surrounding Medication for Opioid Use Disorders (MOUD) treatment, including a shift from in-person to telehealth counseling services adjunct to MOUD treatment. We examine how patient-level barriers impact their counseling experiences. METHODS: We examine data from n = 264 participants who completed a cross-sectional survey regarding their experiences with telephone counseling adjunct to MOUD between July to November 2020. Variables examined include: convenience and satisfaction with telephone counseling, comfort and change in relationship with counselor, and how telephone counseling helped with anxiety, depression, anger, substance use, and recovery. Participants also listed the barriers they faced when using telephone counseling. RESULTS: Thirty-one percent of the sample (n = 81) reported experiencing one or more barriers to telephone counseling. Satisfaction with counseling, perceived convenience, comfort, and beneficial effects of counseling on substance use were associated with increased odds of reporting no barriers (range of p.038 to <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Many participants reported barriers to telehealth counseling, and these barriers were in turn associated with poorer counseling experiences. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Many treatment providers plan to integrate telehealth service provision in their healthcare delivery model, but more research on patient-level barriers and its impact on treatment is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Opioid-Related Disorders , Telemedicine , COVID-19/drug therapy , Counseling , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Opioid-Related Disorders/drug therapy , Pandemics , Telephone
15.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 35, 2022 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased online counselling interventions, including those aimed at university students. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the online counselling intervention during the COVID-19 pandemic, also with regards to the effectiveness of the face-to-face intervention. METHODS: 34 students (Mean age = 23.74; Female = 27) who requested online university counselling during COVID-19 have been compared with 81 (Mean age = 22.8; Female = 60) students who requested university face-to-face counselling before the pandemic. The psychopathological problems were assessed with the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, attachment styles with the Attachment Style Questionnaire, adverse childhood experiences with Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, and life satisfaction with the Life Satisfaction Scale. RESULTS: At the pre-intervention phase, psychological distress was similar in both groups with no differences in the General Severity Index of the SCL-90 R, and there were no significant differences for secure/insecure attachment, adverse childhood experiences, and life satisfaction. The online counselling intervention during the pandemic was effective in reducing psychological distress scales as depression (p = .008), obsessive-compulsive (p = .008), interpersonal sensitivity (p = .005), and anxiety (p = .011), and in the total scale of the SCL-90 R (p = .017). The face-to-face counselling intervention was effective in reducing psychological distress in all subscales and in the total scale of the SCL-90 R (p = .000) and in increasing the level of life satisfaction (p = .023). Attachment style did not moderate the effectiveness of the online and face-to-face interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Students seeking counselling, both before and during the pandemic, show similar levels of psychological distress. The online counselling intervention was almost as effective as face-to-face counselling intervention with respect to psychological distress; it was not effective in increasing life satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Counseling , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Universities , Young Adult
16.
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs ; 36(1): 25-26, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691753
17.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(2): e28886, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686307

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women who are pregnant and have obesity and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) present a higher risk of maternal and perinatal complications. The use of mobile apps and a wristband during pregnancy may contribute to promoting healthy lifestyles and, thus, improving maternal and neonatal health. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex digital health intervention, using a smartband and app with midwife counseling, on GWG and physical activity (PA) in women who are pregnant and have obesity and analyze its impact on maternal and perinatal outcomes. In addition, we aim to study the frequency of use, usability, and satisfaction with the mobile apps used by the women in the intervention group. METHODS: A parallel, 2-arm, randomized controlled trial was conducted. A total of 150 women who were pregnant and had obesity were included. The intervention group received a complex combined digital intervention. The intervention was delivered with a smartband (Mi Band 2) linked to the app Mi Fit to measure PA and the Hangouts app with the midwife to provide personal health information. The control group received usual care. The validated Spanish versions of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form and the System Usability Scale were used. Satisfaction was measured on a 1- to 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: We analyzed 120 women, of whom 30 (25%) were withdrawn because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The median GWG in the intervention group was 7.0 (IQR 4-11) kg versus 9.3 (IQR 5.9-13.3) kg in the control group (P=.04). The adjusted mean GWG per week was 0.5 (95% CI 0.4-0.6) kg per week in the control group and 0.3 (95% CI 0.3-0.4) kg per week in the intervention group (df=0.1, 95% CI -0.2 to 0.03; P=.008). During the 35 and 37 gestational weeks, women in the intervention group had higher mean PA than women in the control group (1980 metabolic equivalents of tasks-minutes per week vs 1386 metabolic equivalents of tasks-minutes per week, respectively; P=.01). No differences were observed between the study groups in the incidence of maternal and perinatal outcomes. In the intervention group, 61% (36/59) of the women who were pregnant used the smartband daily, and 75% (44/59) evaluated the usability of the Mi Fit app as excellent. All women in the intervention group used the Hangouts app at least once a week. The mean of the satisfaction scale with the health counseling app and midwife support was 4.8/5 (SD 0.6) points. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a complex mobile health intervention was associated with adequate GWG, which was lower in the intervention group than in the control group. In addition, we observed that the intervention group had increases in PA. No differences were observed in maternal perinatal complications. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03706872; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03706872.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gestational Weight Gain , Midwifery , Counseling , Exercise , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Obesity/therapy , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Mol Biol Cell ; 32(19): 1795-1796, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1651151

ABSTRACT

No one maps out their tenure as a postdoc anticipating a life-altering tragedy. But mental health crises of all kinds affect academic trainees and staff at similar or higher levels than the general public. While the mental health resources available to trainees are often set by healthcare providers, all levels of university leadership can work to remove material and immaterial obstacles that render such resources out of reach. I describe how access to care via telemedicine helped me following a loss in my family.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Laboratories , Mental Health , Research Personnel/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Counseling/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Psychotherapeutic Processes , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637420

ABSTRACT

Working digitally can lead to changes in work organization and social interactions, as well as work pace and workload. Online counseling is more and more integrated in social counseling. Research exists on employees' and users' attitudes towards online counseling as well as on the advantages and disadvantages of online counseling. There is a lack of studies on the stressors and strains caused by the increasing digitalization and the associated health consequences in this context. With an interview study, we investigated the general work situation of counselors, with a focus on stressors, strain, and resources caused by online counseling. Consecutively, we discuss the results in relation to their impact on workplace health management. Twenty-two explorative interviews with counselors from a German welfare organization were conducted in 2019 and 2020. Qualitative content analysis according to Mayring was used for analysis. Counselors' use of online devices depends on their own digital affinity and is likely to be used when advantages for clients are seen. Difficulties were mentioned in establishing a relationship of trust with the clients. Good teamwork and regular informal exchanges among colleagues contribute to job satisfaction. Overall, we found only few health-related effects. Results of the study suggest that digitization can have positive effects on the job satisfaction of counselors, if the associated changes are supported by organizational measures.


Subject(s)
Counselors , Workplace , Counseling , Counselors/psychology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Workload/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL