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1.
Perm J ; 252021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766161

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Courage , Humans
2.
Evid Based Dent ; 22(2): 48, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705059

Subject(s)
Courage , Humans
3.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1630-1633, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691790

ABSTRACT

Experts have an obligation to make difficult decisions rather than offloading these decisions onto others who may be less well equipped to make them. This commentary considers this obligation through the lens of drafting critical care rationing protocols to address COVID-19-induced scarcity. The author recalls her own experience as a member of multiple groups charged with the generation of protocols for how hospitals and states should ration critical care resources like ventilators and intensive care unit beds, in the event that there would not be enough to go around as the COVID-19 pandemic intensified. She identifies several obvious lessons learned through this process, including the need to combat the pervasive effects of racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination; to enhance the diversity, equity, and inclusion built into the process of drafting rationing protocols; and to embrace transparency, including acknowledging failings and fallibility. She also comes to a more complicated conclusion: Individuals in a position of authority, such as medical ethicists, have a moral obligation to embrace assertion, even when such assertions may well turn out to be wrong. She notes that when the decision-making process is grounded in legitimacy, medical ethics must have the moral courage to embrace fallibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Courage/ethics , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Morals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurs Open ; 9(1): 785-800, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520268

ABSTRACT

AIM: During the Covid-19 pandemic, the risk for nurses' mental health has rapidly increased. The two main goals of this study were the examination of (1) the psychological burden and (2) of suicidal ideation and its associated risk factors one year after the Covid-19 pandemic begun. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional online survey. METHODS: N = 1311 nurses (96.9% female) aged 18-63 years (M = 30.96, SD = 8.48) were assessed for various symptoms of psychological burden, suicidal ideation and behaviour and its risk factors. RESULTS: Almost half of participants (41.5%) reported heightened levels of depressive symptoms, 691 (52.7%) reported a medium to high risk for burnout. One fifth of participants (21.7%) reported suicidal ideation in the past 4 weeks. The direct contact to people with Covid-19 was not related to the extent of the psychological burden. Depression, agitation, perceived burdensomeness and previous suicide attempt were associated with suicidal ideation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Courage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Med Ethics ; 46(8): 510-513, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467730

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the media have repeatedly praised healthcare workers for their 'heroic' work. Although this gratitude is undoubtedly appreciated by many, we must be cautious about overuse of the term 'hero' in such discussions. The challenges currently faced by healthcare workers are substantially greater than those encountered in their normal work, and it is understandable that the language of heroism has been evoked to praise them for their actions. Yet such language can have potentially negative consequences. Here, I examine what heroism is and why it is being applied to the healthcare workers currently, before outlining some of the problems associated with the heroism narrative currently being employed by the media. Healthcare workers have a clear and limited duty to treat during the COVID-19 pandemic, which can be grounded in a broad social contract and is strongly associated with certain reciprocal duties that society has towards healthcare workers. I argue that the heroism narrative can be damaging, as it stifles meaningful discussion about what the limits of this duty to treat are. It fails to acknowledge the importance of reciprocity, and through its implication that all healthcare workers have to be heroic, it can have negative psychological effects on workers themselves. I conclude that rather than invoking the language of heroism to praise healthcare workers, we should examine, as a society, what duties healthcare workers have to work in this pandemic, and how we can support them in fulfilling these.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Courage , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Mass Media , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Opinion , Attitude to Health , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Moral Obligations , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Responsibility
6.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1630-1633, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408212

ABSTRACT

Experts have an obligation to make difficult decisions rather than offloading these decisions onto others who may be less well equipped to make them. This commentary considers this obligation through the lens of drafting critical care rationing protocols to address COVID-19-induced scarcity. The author recalls her own experience as a member of multiple groups charged with the generation of protocols for how hospitals and states should ration critical care resources like ventilators and intensive care unit beds, in the event that there would not be enough to go around as the COVID-19 pandemic intensified. She identifies several obvious lessons learned through this process, including the need to combat the pervasive effects of racism, ableism, and other forms of discrimination; to enhance the diversity, equity, and inclusion built into the process of drafting rationing protocols; and to embrace transparency, including acknowledging failings and fallibility. She also comes to a more complicated conclusion: Individuals in a position of authority, such as medical ethicists, have a moral obligation to embrace assertion, even when such assertions may well turn out to be wrong. She notes that when the decision-making process is grounded in legitimacy, medical ethics must have the moral courage to embrace fallibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Courage/ethics , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Morals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
JAMA ; 326(2): 127-128, 2021 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328582
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(14)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302323

ABSTRACT

Although the required personal protective equipment was not available during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Spanish healthcare workers continued to work, being dubbed as 'healthcare kamikazes'. Two possible reasons are moral courage and purpose in life that, in turn, would modulate the appearance of psychopathology. Cross-sectional study was carried out in 90 Spanish and 59 Mexican healthcare professionals, and 56 medical and nursing students. Spanish professionals had suffered more work and overall exposure (M = 8.30; SD = 2.57 and M = 9.03; SD = 2.66) than Mexican (M = 5.10; SD = 1.87 and M = 5.55; SD = 2.35). Mexican professionals had fewer anxiety disorders (30.5%; n = 18) and a lower depression score (M = 4.45; SD = 5.63) than the Spanish (43.7%; n = 38; and M = 8.69; SD = 8.07). Spanish professionals more often experienced acute stress disorder (32.6%; n = 29). Purpose in life, in addition to having a direct protective effect on psychopathology, also modulated the relationship between personal and family exposure and psychopathology. In conclusion, purpose in life protects against the appearance of psychopathology in healthcare workers with personal and family exposure to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Courage , Mental Disorders , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Morals , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Nurs Open ; 8(6): 3538-3546, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212772

ABSTRACT

AIM: Evaluation the moral courage, moral sensitivity and safe nursing care in nurses caring of infected patients by the COVID-19. DESIGN: This study employed cross-sectional research. METHODS: 520 nurses caring for COVID-19 patients in 5 hospitals were selected via convenience sampling. They completed questionnaires online. Data were analysed by SPSS software version 22. RESULTS: Findings showed that moral courage has a strong and direct correlation with moral sensitivity (p < .001, r = 0-.70) and safe nursing care (p < .001, r = 0-.74). Variables of moral sensitivity, safe nursing care, work experience, age and employment status can predict 64.76% of the variance in moral courage in these nurses. Nursing care of patients with COVID-19 have reported high moral courage in recent months, and in spite of the numerous tensions and stresses in terms of caring these patients during this relative long period, they are still diligent in providing safe and high sensitive care to these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Courage , Nurses , Nursing Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Morals , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Invest Educ Enferm ; 38(2)2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204419

Subject(s)
Courage , Humans , Pandemics
15.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 163(3): 1082-1083, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-956526

Subject(s)
Courage , Humans
17.
Int Nurs Rev ; 68(2): 163-165, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Difficult times of epidemics, wars and an ageing population have made humanity aware of the important role to be played by those who, at the risk of their own health and lives, help and care for others, are the new superheroes of modern reality. Nurses are the foundation of any healthcare system. Today, many of them are on the front line in the fight against COVID-19. Without nurses and other health professionals, the world will not win the fight against epidemics or pandemics or achieve the health potential of populations. AIM: The main purpose of this article is to draw attention to the heroic work of nurses and the role they have to fulfil in society. Their daily work, hardship and courage can be called heroism, especially when in times of epidemics or pandemics they risk their own lives to care for and support those most in need. CONCLUSION: The greatest heroes of today are health professionals, among whom nurses play a key role. The new superheroes can be a symbol of hope, tenacity, courage and persistence of humanity, no matter how difficult a challenge fate presents. Implications for nursing, and Social Policy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse's Role , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Courage , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Med Ethics ; 48(3): 198-199, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088283

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to offer an alternative, more nuanced analysis of the labelling of frontline workers as heroes than originally proposed. Here, we argue that the hero narrative in itself need not be problematic, but highlight a number of wider factors that have led to the initial rise (and subsequent fall) in support for labelling frontline workers as heroes. Through our related work, we have gathered similar stories from frontline workers where they feel betrayed, let down or otherwise short-changed by the hero label, and we have sought to make sense of this through understanding more about how the hero label is used rather than what it means. In this article, we propose a way forward where there is greater discussion around the hero label in this context where individuals can be heroes but still struggle, still fail and still feel vulnerable, and where heroism is viewed as a state of interdependence between heroic actor and the wider group. It is true that heroes can inspire, lead, guide and build morale and camaraderie, but collective responsibility is held with us all. We can draw hope and energy from our heroes, but we must dig deep and be proactive, particularly in the face of adversity. In doing so, we support the heroes to lead from the front and ensure that even though we cannot physically help; we are not making their situation worse.


Subject(s)
Courage , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Humans
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