Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 41
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771198

ABSTRACT

Despite high levels of need, many young people who experience health issues do not seek, access or receive support. Between May and November 2021, using semi-structured interviews, we explored the perspectives of 51 young people (aged 13-14) from two schools who had taken part in a novel online health and wellbeing screening programme, the Digital Health Contact (DHC). One school delivered the DHC during home-learning due to COVID-19 restrictions, whilst the other delivered it in school when restrictions were lifted. The DHC was seen as a useful approach for identifying health need and providing support, and had high levels of acceptability. Young people appreciated the online format of the DHC screening questionnaire and thought this facilitated more honest responses than a face-to-face approach might generate. Completion at home, compared to school-based completion, was perceived as more private and less time-pressured, which young people thought facilitated more honest and detailed responses. Young people's understanding of the screening process (including professional service involvement and confidentiality) influenced engagement and responses. Overall, our findings afford important insights around young people's perspectives of participating in screening programmes, and highlight key considerations for the development and delivery of health screening approaches in (and out of) school.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , School Nursing , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Creativity , Humans , Mass Screening , Schools
2.
Aquichan ; 22(1): e2211, ene. 26, 2022.
Article in English, Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1706483

ABSTRACT

The transformation of health systems to meet the needs of chronic and multi-pathological patients has turned continuity of care into one of the mainstays of care programs and the design of new resources to care for these patients and their families. In this context, nurses' professional practice poses challenges for the three dimensions of continuity of care: relational, informational, and managerial. Faced with these challenges, nursing research is essential for the profession and necessary to promote innovative quality care.


La transformación de los sistemas sanitarios para dar respuesta a las necesidades del paciente crónico y pluripatológico ha situado la continuidad de cuidados como uno de los pilares en los que se basan los programas de atención y el diseño de nuevos recursos para atender a estos pacientes y a sus familias. En este contexto, la práctica profesional de las enfermeras presenta retos y desafíos en las tres dimensiones de la continuidad de cuidados: relacional, informativa y de gestión. Ante estos desafíos, la investigación en enfermería es fundamental para la profesión y necesaria para promover unos cuidados innovadores y de calidad.


A transformação dos sistemas sanitários para atender às necessidades do paciente crônico e pluripatológico situa a continuidade de cuidados como um dos pilares nos quais os programas de atenção e a criação de recursos para assistir esses pacientes e suas famílias estão baseados. Nesse contexto, a prática profissional dos enfermeiros apresenta desafios e obstáculos nas três dimensões da continuidade de cuidados: relacional, informativa e de gestão. Diante desses desafios, a pesquisa em enfermagem é fundamental para a profissão e necessária para promover cuidados inovadores e de qualidade.


Subject(s)
Creativity , Nurse's Role , Shared Governance, Nursing , Leadership , Nursing Care
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686744

ABSTRACT

This article is based on qualitative analysis of interviews and focus groups conducted with participants enrolled in the Senior Programme of the University of Lleida, the City Council of Lleida, and care homes, as well as professional workers in the field of gerontology and related areas. It presents the analysis of interviews focused on the participants' life trajectories, ageing, creativity, self-perception, and quality of life. The study aimed to examine how creativity influences the maintenance and improvement of a sense of wellbeing in older adults, and to reflect on how the perception of old age and of oneself changes through creative activity and active engagement across the life span. The article is framed within a new concept in sociology and the social sciences-'profiguration', which is the key element in the promotion and strengthening of intergenerational interdependence, education, wellbeing, social participation, and active ageing.


Subject(s)
Ageism , Quality of Life , Aged , Aging , Creativity , Humans , Self Concept
4.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(6): 365-367, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604477

ABSTRACT

The unexpected challenges of COVID-19 forced our nation to "rework" normal practices and routines. Kathy Chappell states that nurse professional development practitioners must be problem focused and solution oriented. Led by a nurse professional development specialist, planners employed innovation and creativity to address the problems found in one professional development program. This article assures readers that remote day-long conferences are well accepted and useful in today's fast-paced learning environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Practitioners , Creativity , Humans , Learning , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(10): 1483-1492, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545584

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has prompted an unprecedented shift to remote work. Workers across the globe have used digital technologies to connect with teammates and others in their organizations. In what ways did the COVID-19 crisis alter the frequency and balance of internal and external team interactions? During a crisis, networking offers a type of goal-directed behavior through which individuals source and provide information. We can understand how people use their network through the lens of network churn, changes in embeddedness brought on by the creation, dissolution, and/or reactivation of network ties. higher We posit that performing individuals exhibit distinct networking strategies as compared to lower performing employees during the pandemic. We present a field study conducted in a multinational industrial manufacturing company in China investigating network churn during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings show that, during a crisis, job performance is positively related to the volume of inter-team tie creation and inter-team tie reactivation, but not intra-team tie creation and intra-team tie reactivation. Job performance is not related to the volume of intra- and inter-team tie dissolution. The study provides early, yet important insights into the interplay between crisis and organizational social networks. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Creativity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
6.
Acad Med ; 97(3S): S23-S27, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532562

ABSTRACT

Existing challenges associated with pediatric clinical placements for prelicensure nursing students were heightened when clinical agencies halted nursing student entry in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, the pandemic created opportunities for innovative teaching strategies for pediatric clinical rotations in nursing education. The purpose of this project was to design, develop, and implement meaningful, interactive, and intentional clinical experiences for nursing students that enhanced their pediatric assessment skills, reduced their anxiety about pediatric inpatient care, and advanced their proficiency in the nursing process. Two simulated clinical experiences were created: (1) a virtual pediatric physical assessment checkoff and (2) a pediatric escape room. The pediatric physical assessment checkoff was performed in a remote, virtual setting while students used personal resources to demonstrate their assessment skills. For the escape room, students worked in small, in-person groups using the nursing process to unlock clues to improve their client's health condition. Students reported gaining meaningful clinical experiences through simulation that allowed them to apply their nursing knowledge and increased their confidence in pediatric assessment skills, dosage calculation competency, communications and interactions with the pediatric population, and teamwork abilities. The virtual pediatric physical assessment checkoff and the pediatric escape room were enjoyable and beneficial educational events that facilitated student learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Diagnosis , Patient Simulation , Pediatric Nursing/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Creativity , Humans , Male , Pandemics , South Carolina
7.
Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci ; 380(2214): 20210116, 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528255

ABSTRACT

Percolation theory is essential for understanding disease transmission patterns on the temporal mobility networks. However, the traditional approach of the percolation process can be inefficient when analysing a large-scale, dynamic network for an extended period. Not only is it time-consuming but it is also hard to identify the connected components. Recent studies demonstrate that spatial containers restrict mobility behaviour, described by a hierarchical topology of mobility networks. Here, we leverage crowd-sourced, large-scale human mobility data to construct temporal hierarchical networks composed of over 175 000 block groups in the USA. Each daily network contains mobility between block groups within a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), and long-distance travels across the MSAs. We examine percolation on both levels and demonstrate the changes of network metrics and the connected components under the influence of COVID-19. The research reveals the presence of functional subunits even with high thresholds of mobility. Finally, we locate a set of recurrent critical links that divide components resulting in the separation of core MSAs. Our findings provide novel insights into understanding the dynamical community structure of mobility networks during disruptions and could contribute to more effective infectious disease control at multiple scales. This article is part of the theme issue 'Data science approaches to infectious disease surveillance'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Creativity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512289

ABSTRACT

Overqualification is prevalent in times of economic downturn, and research has increasingly focused on its outcomes. This study aimed to explore the psychological burden caused by perceived overqualification (POQ) and its impact on creativity among high-tech enterprise employees. Drawing from effort-reward imbalance theory, we examined the effect of POQ on emotional exhaustion, along with the mediating role of emotional exhaustion in the POQ-creativity relationship and the moderating role of pay for performance (PFP) in strengthening the link between POQ and emotional exhaustion. Using cross-sectional data from a sample of 359 employees in China, we found that (1) POQ was positively related to emotional exhaustion; (2) emotional exhaustion was negatively related to creativity; (3) PFP moderated the effect of POQ on emotional exhaustion as well as the indirect effect of POQ on creativity via emotional exhaustion. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications.


Subject(s)
Emotions , Reimbursement, Incentive , Creativity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Reward
9.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259226, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502072

ABSTRACT

When emerging technologies transform an organization's way of working, explorative business process management (BPM) becomes a new challenge. Although digital innovations can boost process efficacy and business productivity, employees do not necessarily accept the implied work changes. We therefore looked at the increased digitalization efforts during the COVID-19 lockdowns, during which employees were forced to drastically rethink work by heavily depending on technology for communication and almost all business tasks. This global setting allowed us to scrutinize disruptive work changes and how employees can cope with disruptive work adaptations. We also looked into the explorative skillset needed to adapt to these changes. To theorize about an explorative BPM acceptance model, eleven hypotheses were supported based on a solid theoretical foundation. We followed a quantitative research design using partial least squares for structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) at the university administration settings in two regions, including purposive sampling. Data analysis covered both a measurement model assessment and structural model assessment. Our findings reveal that employees' perceived work modalities, feeling creative and feeling flexible are more promising features than perceived influence and attitude related to explorative work and skill development. We also offer novel insights into explorative business process management (BPM) skills, and which skills are more productive in uncertain or dynamic working conditions. This research is a learning path for managers struggling with flexible or competitive business environments, and more specifically to facilitate employee willingness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Employment , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Algorithms , Creativity , Female , Humans , Learning , Least-Squares Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Organizational , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology , Young Adult
10.
Nurs Forum ; 57(2): 328-329, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494818
11.
Nat Med ; 27(10): 1675-1677, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488033
12.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 86-96, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436199

ABSTRACT

Since March 2020, Ghana's creative arts communities have tracked the complex facets of the COVID-19 pandemic through various art forms. This paper reports a study that analysed selected 'COVID art forms' through arts and health and critical health psychology frameworks. Art forms produced between March and July 2020, and available in the public sphere - traditional media, social media and public spaces - were collated. The data consisted of comedy, cartoons, songs, murals and textile designs. Three key functions emerged from analysis: health promotion (comedy, cartoons, songs); disease prevention (masks); and improving the aesthetics of the healthcare environment (murals). Textile designs performed broader socio-cultural functions of memorialising and political advocacy. Similar to earlier HIV/AIDS and Ebola arts interventions in other African countries, these Ghanaian COVID art forms translated public health information on COVID-19 in ways that connected emotionally, created social awareness and improved public understanding. However, some art forms had limitations: for example, songs that edutained using fear-based strategies or promoting conspiracy theories on the origins and treatment of COVID-19, and state-sponsored visual art that represented public health messaging decoupled from socio-economic barriers to health protection. These were likely to undermine the public health communication goals of behaviour modification. We outline concrete approaches to incorporate creative arts into COVID-19 public health interventions and post-pandemic health systems strengthening in Ghana. FUNDING: None declared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Communication/methods , Health Promotion/methods , Medicine in the Arts , Public Health/methods , Behavior Therapy/methods , Creativity , Ghana , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(5): 332-335, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434537
14.
Public Health ; 195: 118-122, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392518

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We conducted a longitudinal study to analyze emotions that are related to the development of creative activities during isolation and social distancing that are associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: The study was performed in two stages: beginning of isolation (April 2020) and 6 months later during the social distancing period (September 2020). METHODS: A total of 305 people who resided in medium-sized cities (population: 50,000 to one million) in the province of Córdoba, Argentina, participated in the study. In the first stage, the participants answered an online questionnaire about creative activities in which they engaged during isolation. In the second stage, semistructured interviews were conducted that asked about changes in life, creative processes, and new endeavors during the social distancing period. RESULTS: In April 2020, positive emotions were associated with the development of creative activities. In September 2020, a predominance of negative emotions that were related to economic, family, and personal difficulties was observed. However, some positive emotions that are related to the development of new ventures and the consolidation of healthy and sustainable habits were also found. CONCLUSIONS: We highlight the value of creativity as a resilience factor in the development of new projects and postponed activities. Our findings may contribute to the design and development of policies and programs to promote mental health in times of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Creativity , Emotions , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Argentina/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(8): 1156-1168, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368911

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has claimed millions of lives all across the globe, making death more salient to many who may not have been readily cognizant of their mortality. While employees in certain occupations routinely deal with the idea of death or mortality (e.g., hospital workers, firefighters, and police officers), it is uncommon for the average employee to be within an environment that makes them aware of death. However, death awareness has been found to be negatively related to many important outcomes for the organization, including creativity. In the present study, using four-wave longitudinal data collected weekly-during late-June to late-July, 2020, we examine how employees react during the initial peak of COVID-19 pandemic in the United States in terms of death anxiety and death reflection (two different reactions to death awareness) and whether or not death anxiety and death reflection are related to creativity. Conducting cross-lagged panel modeling on four-wave longitudinal data obtained from 605 full-time employees, we find that positive outcomes can come from such trying times as death reflection is positively related to creativity. We offer timely, valuable implications for theory and practice. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Creativity , Data Analysis , Death , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male
17.
Public Health ; 196: 201-203, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316612

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study is the development of a virtual pilot of student and clinician creative enquiry during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. METHODS: Evaluation of the pilot was carried out by a student-staff team and included review of creative pieces submitted, their impact and team reflection, drawing on the differing perspectives of staff and students. RESULTS: A series of powerful creative enquiry texts have been published and presented from this pilot. Evaluation suggests individual and group flourishing are possible through creative expression and dialogue. Coproduction allows development of innovative and complex virtual educational spaces. CONCLUSION: Creative enquiry enables working across hierarchies, disciplines, and the virtual realm to build connection, relationship, and solidarity. Work is needed to create psychological safety and to support wider student engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Creativity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Public Health ; 197: 19-25, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309370

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Creativity has been found to be one of the key therapeutic elements in arts therapies. Arts therapies are psychotherapeutic approaches that aim to facilitate psychological change and personal growth through arts media, such as music, drama, dance, movement and virtual arts. This article presents the findings from children's experiences of participating in arts therapies, particularly those related to creativity. STUDY DESIGN: This study followed a pilot randomised controlled design with embedded qualitative and arts-based methods. Sixty-two children with mild emotional and behavioural difficulties were recruited across four primary schools in North West England. RESULTS: The creative activities with the greatest impact on children's health and well-being were as follows: a) story-making and story-telling; b) drawings; c) puppetry; d) songwriting; and e) empowerment activities. Based on the interviews with children, these activities led to emotional expression, group bonding, empowerment and optimism. The findings were discussed through the lenses of the empowerment theory and the PERMA theory of positive psychology. CONCLUSIONS: Arts therapies allowed children to share experiences and emotions that they may not have otherwise expressed merely through verbal means. During a period where COVID-19 has disrupted academic schedules and sparked a transitional period at schools, opportunities for creativity and engagement with the arts may contribute significantly to support children's emerging health needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Creativity , Humans , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
19.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 60(11): 1334-1336, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300825

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on youth, including through increased isolation, the transition to online schooling, decreased access to arts and sports programming, exposure to illness, and anxiety. The pandemic has also affected the delivery of therapeutic services at a time when youth have needed more help building coping skills and reducing stress. Creative arts and movement therapies promote creativity and adaptability to better develop cognitive flexibility1 while enhancing self-regulation and self-direction, adaptive skills that are protective in the face of stress.2 Creative arts and movement-based group therapies delivered through community settings-such as resettlement agencies, schools, and community recreation centers-are feasible, cost-effective, and increase accessibility, especially for populations often underrepresented in the therapeutic space.3 Offering such interventions at the group level benefits both those who are experiencing significant stress and anxiety4,5 and those who are not experiencing such symptoms, as they still reap the long-term benefits of building stress-relaxation and emotion regulation skills. Having previously demonstrated the efficacy of art therapy (AT) and dance/movement therapy (DMT) in improving posttraumatic stress and anxiety symptoms for youth,4,5 our laboratory-the Stress, Trauma, and Anxiety Research Clinic-shifted programming to virtual formats, in partnerships with local resettlement agencies and schools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Creativity , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL