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1.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3443-3447, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: COVID-19 affects the brain in various ways, amongst which delirium is worrying. An assessment was made of whether a specific, long-lasting, COVID-19-related brain injury develops in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients after life-saving re-oxygenation. METHODS: Ten COVID+ patients (COVID+) with unusual delirium associated with neuroimaging suggestive of diffuse brain injury and seven controls with non-COVID encephalopathy were studied. The assessment took place when the intractable delirium started at weaning off ventilation support. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed followed by standard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses and assessment of CSF erythropoietin concentrations (as a marker for the assessment of tissue repair), and of non-targeted CSF metabolomics using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Patients were similar as regards severity scores, but COVID+ were hospitalized longer (25 [11.75; 25] vs. 9 [4.5; 12.5] days, p = 0.03). On admission, but not at MRI and lumbar puncture performance, COVID+ were more hypoxic (p = 0.002). On MRI, there were leptomeningeal enhancement and diffuse white matter haemorrhages only in COVID+. In the latter, CSF erythropoietin concentration was lower (1.73 [1.6; 2.06] vs. 3.04 [2.9; 3.91] mIU/ml, p = 0.01), and CSF metabolomics indicated (a) increased compounds such as foodborne molecules (sesquiterpenes), molecules from industrialized beverages and micro-pollutants (diethanolamine); and (b) decreased molecules such as incomplete breakdown products of protein catabolism and foodborne molecules (glabridin). At 3-month discharge, fatigue, anxiety and depression as well as MRI lesions persisted in COVID+. CONCLUSIONS: Some COVID+ are at risk of a specific delirium. Imperfect brain repair after re-oxygenation and lifestyle factors might influence long-lasting brain injuries in a context of foodborne micro-pollutants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Environmental Pollutants , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Critical Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3289-3302, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The full spectrum of neurological sequelae in COVID-19 is beginning to emerge. SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to cause both direct and indirect brain vascular endothelial damage through infection and inflammation that may result in long-term neurological signs and symptoms. We sought to illuminate persistent neuro-ophthalmological deficits that may be seen following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) due to COVID-19. METHODS: We identified three individuals with PRES due to COVID-19 in our hospital system. One patient was identified on presentation to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic. The other patients were identified through internal records search. These cases were compared to published reports of PRES in COVID-19 identified through systematic literature search of PubMed/LitCOVID. RESULTS: All three patients were hospitalized with severe COVID-19 and developed altered mental status with new onset seizures that led to the recognition of PRES through diagnostic imaging. During recovery, two patients had persistent visual dysfunction including visual field deficits. One patient also experienced hallucinatory palinopsia and visual hallucinations. Literature search identified 32 other cases of PRES in the context of COVID-19. Visual disturbances were described in 14 cases (40%), with only seven cases (50%) reporting full recovery by the time of publication. CONCLUSIONS: As we learn about enduring neurological complications of COVID-19, it is possible that complications may be underrecognized and underreported. Understanding the range of complications can help in postcare evaluation and management changes in the critical care setting to potentially allow intervention before persistent deficits occur due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome , Critical Care , Humans , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/complications , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/etiology
3.
4.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(1): e13, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is generally asymptomatic or mild in otherwise healthy children, however, severe cases may occur. In this study, we report the clinical characteristics of children classified as critical COVID-19 in Korea to provide further insights into risk factors and management in children. METHODS: This study was a retrospective case series of children < 18 years of age classified as critical COVID-19. Cases were identified by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency surveillance system and medical records were reviewed. Critical COVID-19 was defined as cases with severe illness requiring noninvasive (high flow nasal cannula, continuous positive airway pressure, or bilevel positive airway pressure) or invasive mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), between January 20, 2020 and October 7, 2021. RESULTS: Among 39,146 cases diagnosed with COVID-19 in subjects < 18 years of age, eight cases (0.02%) were identified as critical COVID-19. The median age was 13 years (range 10 month-17 years) and male-to-female ratio was 1:1. Three children had underlying diseases; one child has asthma and major depressive disorder, one child had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and one child had mental retardation and was newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus with the diagnosis of COVID-19. Among the eight children, seven were obese (body mass index range [BMI] median 29.3, range 25.9-38.2, weight-for-length > 97% for infant) and one was overweight (BMI 21.3). All patients had fever, six patients had dyspnea or cough and other accompanied symptoms included sore throat, headache, lethargy and myalgia. Radiologic findings showed pneumonia within 1-8 days after symptom onset. Pneumonia progressed in these children for 2-6 days and was improved within 5-32 days after diagnosis. Among the eight critical cases, remdesivir was administered in six cases. Steroids were provided for all cases. Inotropics were administered in one case. Six cases were treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilator and three required mechanical ventilator. One case required ECMO due to acute respiratory distress syndrome. All cases were admitted to the intensive care unit and admission period ranged from 9-39 days. Among all critical COVID-19 cases < 18 years of age, there were no fatal cases. CONCLUSION: To develop appropriate policies for children in the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to monitor and assess the clinical burden in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
5.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 14, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is predominately known as a respiratory disease associated with pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. However, extra-pulmonary complications of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are increasingly being recognized. In this regard, some studies implied the hemostatic and vascular involvements in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH) in a pregnant patient with COVID-19 and history of cesarean section a week before the occurrence of ICH. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy with acceptable outcome. Hemorrhagic events, including ICH, may happen during COVID-19 infection with several possible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients, especially high-risk groups, are at a risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Therefore, close follow-up must be maintained and hemorrhagic events must be kept in mind in these cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Cerebral Hemorrhage/pathology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/surgery , Craniotomy , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/surgery , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Treatment Outcome
6.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 45(1): 13-21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607874

ABSTRACT

The aim of this article is to identify quality improvement nursing strategies that have been implemented to safeguard COVID-19 patients from harm while being cared for in the intensive care unit (ICU). This article incorporates a literature review on the experiences of nurses working at a large urban teaching hospital in the areas of critical care, quality, safety, and regulatory. As leaders in the delivery of health care, nurses have always pioneered innovative ways to deliver care despite difficult circumstances. COVID-19 is a novel viral disease with many unknowns, and it required nurses to integrate innovative approaches with evidence-based practice in order to meet the needs of the patient and to ensure patient safety. While in the critical care setting, COVID-19 patients are at an increased risk for various hospital-acquired injuries, threats to personal safety, and decline in mental health. Through ingenuity and adaptability, successful nursing strategies have been identified in the delivery of quality, evidence-based nursing care to safeguard the vulnerable COVID-19 patient population from harm while in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2140568, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592803

ABSTRACT

Importance: Obesity, diabetes, and hypertension are common comorbidities in patients with severe COVID-19, yet little is known about the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or death in patients with COVID-19 and metabolic syndrome. Objective: To determine whether metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of ARDS and death from COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter cohort study used data from the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Viral Respiratory Illness Universal Study collected from 181 hospitals across 26 countries from February 15, 2020, to February 18, 2021. Outcomes were compared between patients with metabolic syndrome (defined as ≥3 of the following criteria: obesity, prediabetes or diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) and a control population without metabolic syndrome. Participants included adult patients hospitalized for COVID-19 during the study period who had a completed discharge status. Data were analyzed from February 22 to October 5, 2021. Exposures: Exposures were SARS-CoV-2 infection, metabolic syndrome, obesity, prediabetes or diabetes, hypertension, and/or dyslipidemia. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included ARDS, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS). Results: Among 46 441 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 29 040 patients (mean [SD] age, 61.2 [17.8] years; 13 059 [45.0%] women and 15713 [54.1%] men; 6797 Black patients [23.4%], 5325 Hispanic patients [18.3%], and 16 507 White patients [57.8%]) met inclusion criteria. A total of 5069 patients (17.5%) with metabolic syndrome were compared with 23 971 control patients (82.5%) without metabolic syndrome. In adjusted analyses, metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of ICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.32 [95% CI, 1.14-1.53]), invasive mechanical ventilation (aOR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.28-1.65]), ARDS (aOR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.12-1.66]), and mortality (aOR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.08-1.31]) and prolonged hospital LOS (median [IQR], 8.0 [4.2-15.8] days vs 6.8 [3.4-13.0] days; P < .001) and ICU LOS (median [IQR], 7.0 [2.8-15.0] days vs 6.4 [2.7-13.0] days; P < .001). Each additional metabolic syndrome criterion was associated with increased risk of ARDS in an additive fashion (1 criterion: 1147 patients with ARDS [10.4%]; P = .83; 2 criteria: 1191 patients with ARDS [15.3%]; P < .001; 3 criteria: 817 patients with ARDS [19.3%]; P < .001; 4 criteria: 203 patients with ARDS [24.3%]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risks of ARDS and death in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The association with ARDS was cumulative for each metabolic syndrome criteria present.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Critical Care , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JAAPA ; 35(1): 53-57, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584037

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The rapid spread of COVID-19 brought forth a rapid increase in hospitalization rates, requiring changes in hospital use and medical personnel structure. Physician assistants (PAs) and NPs in pediatric critical care were cross-trained and redeployed to our pediatric biocontainment unit to address the clinician strain in providing high-quality patient care during these unprecedented times. This manuscript discusses the effectiveness of using these clinicians while recognizing the challenges of managing a novel virus in a new unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Practitioners , Physician Assistants , Child , Critical Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 431, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that as CARDS may present different pathophysiological features than classic ARDS, the application of high levels of end-expiratory pressure is questionable. Our first aim was to investigate the effects of 5-15 cmH2O of PEEP on partitioned respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and dead space; secondly, we investigated whether respiratory system compliance and severity of hypoxemia could affect the response to PEEP on partitioned respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and dead space, dividing the population according to the median value of respiratory system compliance and oxygenation. Thirdly, we explored the effects of an additional PEEP selected according to the Empirical PEEP-FiO2 table of the EPVent-2 study on partitioned respiratory mechanics and gas exchange in a subgroup of patients. METHODS: Sixty-one paralyzed mechanically ventilated patients with a confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 were enrolled (age 60 [54-67] years, PaO2/FiO2 113 [79-158] mmHg and PEEP 10 [10-10] cmH2O). Keeping constant tidal volume, respiratory rate and oxygen fraction, two PEEP levels (5 and 15 cmH2O) were selected. In a subgroup of patients an additional PEEP level was applied according to an Empirical PEEP-FiO2 table (empirical PEEP). At each PEEP level gas exchange, partitioned lung mechanics and hemodynamic were collected. RESULTS: At 15 cmH2O of PEEP the lung elastance, lung stress and mechanical power were higher compared to 5 cmH2O. The PaO2/FiO2, arterial carbon dioxide and ventilatory ratio increased at 15 cmH2O of PEEP. The arterial-venous oxygen difference and central venous saturation were higher at 15 cmH2O of PEEP. Both the mechanics and gas exchange variables significantly increased although with high heterogeneity. By increasing the PEEP from 5 to 15 cmH2O, the changes in partitioned respiratory mechanics and mechanical power were not related to hypoxemia or respiratory compliance. The empirical PEEP was 18 ± 1 cmH2O. The empirical PEEP significantly increased the PaO2/FiO2 but also driving pressure, lung elastance, lung stress and mechanical power compared to 15 cmH2O of PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19 ARDS during the early phase the effects of raising PEEP are highly variable and cannot easily be predicted by respiratory system characteristics, because of the heterogeneity of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury , COVID-19/diagnosis , Critical Care , Humans , Hypoxia , Middle Aged , Oxygen/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/diagnostic imaging
13.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261024, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tracheostomy has been proposed as an option to help organize the healthcare system to face the unprecedented number of patients hospitalized for a COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in intensive care units (ICU). It is, however, considered a particularly high-risk procedure for contamination. This paper aims to provide our experience in performing tracheostomies on COVID-19 critically ill patients during the pandemic and its long-term local complications. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients tracheostomized for a COVID-19-related ARDS in two university hospitals in the Paris region between January 27th (date of first COVID-19 admission) and May 18th, 2020 (date of last tracheostomy performed). We focused on tracheostomy technique (percutaneous versus surgical), timing (early versus late) and late complications. RESULTS: Forty-eight tracheostomies were performed with an equal division between surgical and percutaneous techniques. There was no difference in patients' characteristics between surgical and percutaneous groups. Tracheostomy was performed after a median of 17 [12-22] days of mechanical ventilation (MV), with 10 patients in the "early" group (≤ day 10) and 38 patients in the "late" group (> day 10). Survivors required MV for a median of 32 [22-41] days and were ultimately decannulated with a median of 21 [15-34] days spent on cannula. Patients in the early group had shorter ICU and hospital stays (respectively 15 [12-19] versus 35 [25-47] days; p = 0.002, and 21 [16-28] versus 54 [35-72] days; p = 0.002) and spent less time on MV (respectively 17 [14-20] and 35 [27-43] days; p<0.001). Interestingly, patients in the percutaneous group had shorter hospital and rehabilitation center stays (respectively 44 [34-81] versus 92 [61-118] days; p = 0.012, and 24 [11-38] versus 45 [22-71] days; p = 0.045). Of the 30 (67%) patients examined by a head and neck surgeon, 17 (57%) had complications with unilateral laryngeal palsy (n = 5) being the most prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Tracheostomy seems to be a safe procedure that could help ICU organization by delegating work to a separate team and favoring patient turnover by allowing faster transfer to step-down units. Following guidelines alone was found sufficient to prevent the risk of aerosolization and contamination of healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Tracheostomy/methods , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Paris , Personnel, Hospital , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580727

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study was conducted in critical care units and emergency services and was aimed at considering the death notification (DN) phenomenology among physicians (notifiers), patient relatives (receivers) and those who work between them (nurses). Through the qualitative method, a systemic perspective was adopted to recognise three different categories of representation: 23 clinicians, 13 nurses and 11 family members of COVID-19 victims were interviewed, totalling 47 people from all over Italy (25 females, mean age: 46,36; SD: 10,26). With respect to notifiers, the following themes emerged: the changes in the relational dimension, protective factors and difficulties related to DN. With respect to receivers, the hospital was perceived as a prison, bereavement between DN, lost rituals and continuing bonds. Among nurses, changes in the relational dimension, protective factors and the impact of the death. Some common issues between physicians and nurses were relational difficulties in managing distancing and empathy and the support of relatives and colleagues. The perspective of receivers showed suffering related to loss and health care professionals' inefficacy in communication. Specifically, everyone considered DNs mismanaged because of the COVID-19 emergency. Some considerations inherent in death education for DN management among health professionals were presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Respir Med ; 187: 106538, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Analyses of COVID-19 infection outcomes in patients with preexisting pulmonary sarcoidosis are lacking and are limited to case reports or small case series with the largest study reporting outcomes of 37 patients. RESEARCH QUESTION: Retrospective cohort study to assess clinical outcomes of 945 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, presenting with COVID 19, compared to a propensity matched cohort of patients without sarcoidosis. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Analysis of a multi-center research network TriNETX was performed including patients more than 16 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19. Outcomes in COVID-19 positive patients with concurrent pulmonary sarcoidosis were compared with a propensity score matched cohort of patients without pulmonary sarcoidosis. RESULTS: A total of 278,271 patients with COVID-19 on the research network were identified, 954 patients (0.34 %) carried a diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Mean age of patients with sarcoidosis was 56.3 ± 13.2 years, with female predominance (n = 619, 64.89 %). 49.69 % of the participants were African American (n = 474). Co-morbidities including hypertension, chronic lower respiratory diseases, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, nicotine dependence, and chronic kidney disease were more common in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis when compared to the non-pulmonary sarcoidosis cohort (all p values < 0.01). In unmatched analysis, pulmonary sarcoidosis group had higher mortality, increased risk for hospitalization, intubation and need for renal replacement therapy. After propensity score matching, no difference in any of the outcome measures was observed. INTERPRETATION: Crude COVID-19 mortality and other clinical outcome measures are poor in pulmonary sarcoidosis cohort; however, propensity-matched analyses revealed no difference in outcomes, showing that higher mortality is driven by higher burden of comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/complications , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/mortality , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Propensity Score , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary/therapy , Survival Rate
16.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e26257, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, an initial risk-adapted allocation is crucial for managing medical resources and providing intensive care. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to identify factors that predict the overall survival rate for COVID-19 cases and develop a COVID-19 prognosis score (COPS) system based on these factors. In addition, disease severity and the length of hospital stay for patients with COVID-19 were analyzed. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a nationwide cohort of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases between January and April 2020 in Korea. The cohort was split randomly into a development cohort and a validation cohort with a 2:1 ratio. In the development cohort (n=3729), we tried to identify factors associated with overall survival and develop a scoring system to predict the overall survival rate by using parameters identified by the Cox proportional hazard regression model with bootstrapping methods. In the validation cohort (n=1865), we evaluated the prediction accuracy using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The score of each variable in the COPS system was rounded off following the log-scaled conversion of the adjusted hazard ratio. RESULTS: Among the 5594 patients included in this analysis, 234 (4.2%) died after receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis. In the development cohort, six parameters were significantly related to poor overall survival: older age, dementia, chronic renal failure, dyspnea, mental disturbance, and absolute lymphocyte count <1000/mm3. The following risk groups were formed: low-risk (score 0-2), intermediate-risk (score 3), high-risk (score 4), and very high-risk (score 5-7) groups. The COPS system yielded an area under the curve value of 0.918 for predicting the 14-day survival rate and 0.896 for predicting the 28-day survival rate in the validation cohort. Using the COPS system, 28-day survival rates were discriminatively estimated at 99.8%, 95.4%, 82.3%, and 55.1% in the low-risk, intermediate-risk, high-risk, and very high-risk groups, respectively, of the total cohort (P<.001). The length of hospital stay and disease severity were directly associated with overall survival (P<.001), and the hospital stay duration was significantly longer among survivors (mean 26.1, SD 10.7 days) than among nonsurvivors (mean 15.6, SD 13.3 days). CONCLUSIONS: The newly developed predictive COPS system may assist in making risk-adapted decisions for the allocation of medical resources, including intensive care, during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Dementia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
17.
Am J Disaster Med ; 16(3): 179-192, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572826

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Many hospitals were unprepared for the surge of patients associated with the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We describe the processes to develop and implement a surge plan framework for resource allocation, staffing, and standardized management in response to the COVID-19 pandemic across a large integrated regional healthcare system. SETTING: A large academic medical center in the Cleveland metropolitan area, with a network of 10 regional hospitals throughout Northeastern Ohio with a daily capacity of more than 500 intensive care unit (ICU) beds. RESULTS: At the beginning of the pandemic, an equitable delivery of healthcare services across the healthcare system was developed. This distribution of resources was implemented with the potential needs and resources of the individual ICUs in mind, and epidemiologic predictions of virus transmissibility. We describe the processes to develop and implement a surge plan framework for resource allocation, staffing, and standardized management in response to the COVID-19 pandemic across a large integrated regional healthcare system. We also describe an additional level of surge capacity, which is available to well-integrated institutions called "extension of capacity." This refers to the ability to immediately have access to the beds and resources within a hospital system with minimal administrative burden. CONCLUSIONS: Large integrated hospital systems may have an advantage over individual hospitals because they can shift supplies among regional partners, which may lead to faster mobilization of resources, rather than depending on local and national governments. The pandemic response of our healthcare system highlights these benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surge Capacity , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Hospital Bed Capacity , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 767517, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572342

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) throughout the world leads to a series of modifications of several National Health Service organizations, with a potential series of psychological consequences among nurses. Methods: This study was undertaken to assess the psychological stress, anxiety factors, and coping mechanisms of critical care unit nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak. A cross-sectional research design was employed, and the convenience sample consisted of 469 nurses working at several hospitals in Saudi Arabia during the period from July to September 2020. This study used the Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Coping Mechanism, and Nursing Stress scale. Results: Interestingly, more than one-third and one-quarter of the studied nurses had severe and moderate anxiety levels, respectively. In addition, the most anxiety-causing factors included providing care for their infected colleagues and worrying about infecting their families. More than one-quarter and slightly less than half of the studied nurses had high and moderate stress levels, respectively. Furthermore, more than half of the participants had low coping mechanisms and one-quarter had moderate coping mechanisms. In addition, there was a strong positive correlation between anxiety and stress levels, and there was a strong negative correlation between coping mechanisms and stress and anxiety levels. Conclusions: Collectively, this study explored the psychological stress, anxiety factors, and coping mechanisms among critical care unit nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak in Saudi Arabia. Continuous educational programs for nurses on using coping mechanisms should be developed in combination with teaching preventive measures for defining a psychological intervention plan within a mandatory occupational health surveillance program. This study recommends that constructive planning and necessary provision of supportive measures by the legal authorities and policymakers protect nurses and minimize their psychological stress to fulfill high-quality nursing care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , State Medicine , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
19.
Soins ; 66(861): 47-50, 2021 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569064

ABSTRACT

The intervention of physiotherapists in the intensive care unit allows the optimisation of the care project through the assessment and management of the motor, respiratory and swallowing functions of patients. If COVID-19 has only slightly modified the practice of these professionals, the impact of the pandemic on intensive care units has reinforced the added value of their care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
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