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1.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 16(1): 361, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599128

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess changes in cardiovascular disease severity, types, postoperative complications and prognosis during the COVID-19 pandemic and to explore possible influencing factors. METHODS: A total of 422 patients were enrolled in this study, and hospitalization and short-term follow-up data were retained. The patient population included 273 men and 149 women. Patients had a median (IQR) age of 54 (45-62) years and were divided into an observation group (130) and a control group (292), primarily according to severity of disease, disease types, baseline indexes, biochemical indexes, cardiac function indexes, complications and prognosis. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with the same period last year, there was a significant increase in patients with aortic dissection (27.69% vs 5.82%), a significant decrease in patients with valvular heart disease (43.08% vs 66.78%), and significantly increased emergency admission (50.00% vs 21.23%) and severity (54.62% vs 27.40%). Family company (76.37% vs 64.62%) was decreased, EuroSCORE [6.5 (2-9) vs 2 (0-5)] score, Pro-BNP [857.50 (241.00-2222.50) vs 542.40 (113.45-1776.75)] ng/L, six months mortality rate (18.46% vs 8.90%), and postoperative complications, including infected patients, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, and so on were increased, with longer length of stay in the ICU and hospital in COVID-19 pandemic. Survival analysis curve further demonstrated that it had an impact on the deaths of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic period. Through ROC analysis of the death factors of patients, it was concluded that Family company affected the death of patients, and the area under the curve was 0.654 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that the admission rate of critically ill patients with cardiovascular disease, complications of cardiac surgery, and short-term mortality of patients all exhibited a short-term increase, family company may be a risk factors for short-term mortality, that may be related to public pressure caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 382, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are few reports of new functional impairment following critical illness from COVID-19. We aimed to describe the incidence of death or new disability, functional impairment and changes in health-related quality of life of patients after COVID-19 critical illness at 6 months. METHODS: In a nationally representative, multicenter, prospective cohort study of COVID-19 critical illness, we determined the prevalence of death or new disability at 6 months, the primary outcome. We measured mortality, new disability and return to work with changes in the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 12L (WHODAS) and health status with the EQ5D-5LTM. RESULTS: Of 274 eligible patients, 212 were enrolled from 30 hospitals. The median age was 61 (51-70) years, and 124 (58.5%) patients were male. At 6 months, 43/160 (26.9%) patients died and 42/108 (38.9%) responding survivors reported new disability. Compared to pre-illness, the WHODAS percentage score worsened (mean difference (MD), 10.40% [95% CI 7.06-13.77]; p < 0.001). Thirteen (11.4%) survivors had not returned to work due to poor health. There was a decrease in the EQ-5D-5LTM utility score (MD, - 0.19 [- 0.28 to - 0.10]; p < 0.001). At 6 months, 82 of 115 (71.3%) patients reported persistent symptoms. The independent predictors of death or new disability were higher severity of illness and increased frailty. CONCLUSIONS: At six months after COVID-19 critical illness, death and new disability was substantial. Over a third of survivors had new disability, which was widespread across all areas of functioning. Clinical trial registration NCT04401254 May 26, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Disabled Persons , Recovery of Function/physiology , Return to Work/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Prospective Studies , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(7): 458-467, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470186

ABSTRACT

Early descriptions of COVID-19 associated coagulopathy identified it as a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). However, recent studies have highlighted the potential role of endothelial cell injury in its pathogenesis, and other possible underlying mechanisms are being explored. This study aimed to analyse the coagulation parameters of critically and noncritically ill patients with COVID-19 bilateral pneumonia, determine if coagulation factors consumption occurs and explore other potential mechanisms of COVID-19 coagulopathy. Critically and noncritically ill patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 bilateral pneumonia were recruited. For each patient, we performed basic coagulation tests, quantification of coagulation factors and physiological inhibitor proteins, an evaluation of the fibrinolytic system and determination of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) and ADAMTS13. Laboratory data were compared with clinical data and outcomes. The study involved 62 patients (31 ICU, 31 non-ICU). The coagulation parameters assessment demonstrated normal median prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in our cohort and all coagulation factors were within normal range. PAI-1 median levels were elevated (median 52.6 ng/ml; IQR 37.2-85.7), as well as vWF activity (median 216%; IQR 196-439) and antigen (median 174%; IQR 153.5-174.1). A mild reduction of ADAMTS13 was observed in critically ill patients and nonsurvivors. We demonstrated an inverse correlation between ADAMTS13 levels and inflammatory markers, D-dimer and SOFA score in our cohort. Elevated vWF and PAI-1 levels, and a mild reduction of ADAMTS13 in the most severe patients, suggest that COVID-19 coagulopathy is an endotheliopathy that has shared features with thrombotic microangiopathy.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/deficiency , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 214, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill COVID-19 patients have pathophysiological lung features characterized by perfusion abnormalities. However, to date no study has evaluated whether the changes in the distribution of pulmonary gas and blood volume are associated with the severity of gas-exchange impairment and the type of respiratory support (non-invasive versus invasive) in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This was a single-center, retrospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Northern Italy during the first pandemic wave. Pulmonary gas and blood distribution was assessed using a technique for quantitative analysis of dual-energy computed tomography. Lung aeration loss (reflected by percentage of normally aerated lung tissue) and the extent of gas:blood volume mismatch (percentage of non-aerated, perfused lung tissue-shunt; aerated, non-perfused dead space; and non-aerated/non-perfused regions) were evaluated in critically ill COVID-19 patients with different clinical severity as reflected by the need for non-invasive or invasive respiratory support. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients admitted to the intensive care unit between February 29th and May 30th, 2020 were included. Patients requiring invasive versus non-invasive mechanical ventilation had both a lower percentage of normally aerated lung tissue (median [interquartile range] 33% [24-49%] vs. 63% [44-68%], p < 0.001); and a larger extent of gas:blood volume mismatch (43% [30-49%] vs. 25% [14-28%], p = 0.001), due to higher shunt (23% [15-32%] vs. 5% [2-16%], p = 0.001) and non-aerated/non perfused regions (5% [3-10%] vs. 1% [0-2%], p = 0.001). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio correlated positively with normally aerated tissue (ρ = 0.730, p < 0.001) and negatively with the extent of gas-blood volume mismatch (ρ = - 0.633, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and oxygenation impairment were associated with loss of aeration and the extent of gas:blood volume mismatch.


Subject(s)
Blood Volume/physiology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/metabolism , Pulmonary Gas Exchange/physiology , Aged , Blood Gas Analysis/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
5.
Respir Investig ; 59(6): 804-809, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine risk factors associated with critical coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) and to establish a risk predictive model for Japanese patients. METHODS: We retrospectively assessed adult Japanese patients diagnosed with COVID-19 at the Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan between February 1, 2020 and March 10, 2021. The patients were divided into critical and non-critical groups based on their condition during the clinical courses. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between clinical characteristics and critical illness. Based on the results, we established a predictive model for the development of critical COVID-19. RESULTS: In total, 300 patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, 86 were included in the critical group. Analyses revealed that age ≥65 y, hemodialysis, need for O2 supplementation upon diagnosis, and an initial serum C-reactive protein level of ≥6.5 mg/dL were independently associated with the development of critical COVID-19. Next, a predictive model for the development of critical COVID-19 was created, and this included the following variables: age ≥65 y, male sex, diabetes, hemodialysis, need for O2 supplementation upon diagnosis, and an initial serum C-reactive protein level of ≥6.5 mg/dL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.90). Using a cutoff score of 12, the positive and negative predictive values of 74.0% and 80.4% were obtained, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Upon diagnosis, the predictive model can be used to identify adult Japanese patients with COVID-19 who will require intensive treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256361, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critical illness is common throughout the world and has been the focus of a dramatic increase in attention during the COVID-19 pandemic. Severely deranged vital signs such as hypoxia, hypotension and low conscious level can identify critical illness. These vital signs are simple to check and treatments that aim to correct derangements are established, basic and low-cost. The aim of the study was to estimate the unmet need of such essential treatments for severely deranged vital signs in all adults admitted to hospitals in Malawi. METHODS: We conducted a point prevalence cross-sectional study of adult hospitalized patients in Malawi. All in-patients aged ≥18 on single days Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and Chiradzulu District Hospital (CDH) were screened. Patients with hypoxia (oxygen saturation <90%), hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90mmHg) and reduced conscious level (Glasgow Coma Scale <9) were included in the study. The a-priori defined essential treatments were oxygen therapy for hypoxia, intravenous fluid for hypotension and an action to protect the airway for reduced consciousness (placing the patient in the lateral position, insertion of an oro-pharyngeal airway or endo-tracheal tube or manual airway protection). RESULTS: Of the 1135 hospital in-patients screened, 45 (4.0%) had hypoxia, 103 (9.1%) had hypotension, and 17 (1.5%) had a reduced conscious level. Of those with hypoxia, 40 were not receiving oxygen (88.9%). Of those with hypotension, 94 were not receiving intravenous fluids (91.3%). Of those with a reduced conscious level, nine were not receiving an action to protect the airway (53.0%). CONCLUSION: There was a large unmet need of essential treatments for critical illness in two hospitals in Malawi.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Hypotension/epidemiology , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Malawi/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged
7.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 304, 2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370943

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has underlined the urgent need for reliable, multicenter, and full-admission intensive care data to advance our understanding of the course of the disease and investigate potential treatment strategies. In this study, we present the Dutch Data Warehouse (DDW), the first multicenter electronic health record (EHR) database with full-admission data from critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A nation-wide data sharing collaboration was launched at the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020. All hospitals in the Netherlands were asked to participate and share pseudonymized EHR data from adult critically ill COVID-19 patients. Data included patient demographics, clinical observations, administered medication, laboratory determinations, and data from vital sign monitors and life support devices. Data sharing agreements were signed with participating hospitals before any data transfers took place. Data were extracted from the local EHRs with prespecified queries and combined into a staging dataset through an extract-transform-load (ETL) pipeline. In the consecutive processing pipeline, data were mapped to a common concept vocabulary and enriched with derived concepts. Data validation was a continuous process throughout the project. All participating hospitals have access to the DDW. Within legal and ethical boundaries, data are available to clinicians and researchers. RESULTS: Out of the 81 intensive care units in the Netherlands, 66 participated in the collaboration, 47 have signed the data sharing agreement, and 35 have shared their data. Data from 25 hospitals have passed through the ETL and processing pipeline. Currently, 3464 patients are included in the DDW, both from wave 1 and wave 2 in the Netherlands. More than 200 million clinical data points are available. Overall ICU mortality was 24.4%. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters were most frequently measured throughout a patient's stay. For each patient, all administered medication and their daily fluid balance were available. Missing data are reported for each descriptive. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we show that EHR data from critically ill COVID-19 patients may be lawfully collected and can be combined into a data warehouse. These initiatives are indispensable to advance medical data science in the field of intensive care medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Data Warehousing/statistics & numerical data , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Critical Care , Humans , Netherlands
8.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 295, 2021 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intensive Care Resources are heavily utilized during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, risk stratification and prediction of SARS-CoV-2 patient clinical outcomes upon ICU admission remain inadequate. This study aimed to develop a machine learning model, based on retrospective & prospective clinical data, to stratify patient risk and predict ICU survival and outcomes. METHODS: A Germany-wide electronic registry was established to pseudonymously collect admission, therapeutic and discharge information of SARS-CoV-2 ICU patients retrospectively and prospectively. Machine learning approaches were evaluated for the accuracy and interpretability of predictions. The Explainable Boosting Machine approach was selected as the most suitable method. Individual, non-linear shape functions for predictive parameters and parameter interactions are reported. RESULTS: 1039 patients were included in the Explainable Boosting Machine model, 596 patients retrospectively collected, and 443 patients prospectively collected. The model for prediction of general ICU outcome was shown to be more reliable to predict "survival". Age, inflammatory and thrombotic activity, and severity of ARDS at ICU admission were shown to be predictive of ICU survival. Patients' age, pulmonary dysfunction and transfer from an external institution were predictors for ECMO therapy. The interaction of patient age with D-dimer levels on admission and creatinine levels with SOFA score without GCS were predictors for renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Using Explainable Boosting Machine analysis, we confirmed and weighed previously reported and identified novel predictors for outcome in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Using this strategy, predictive modeling of COVID-19 ICU patient outcomes can be performed overcoming the limitations of linear regression models. Trial registration "ClinicalTrials" (clinicaltrials.gov) under NCT04455451.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units , Machine Learning , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
13.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 212, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is highly variable between individuals, ranging from asymptomatic infection to critical disease with acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation. Such variability stresses the need for novel biomarkers associated with disease outcome. As SARS-CoV-2 infection causes a kidney proximal tubule dysfunction with urinary loss of uric acid, we hypothesized that low serum levels of uric acid (hypouricemia) may be associated with severity and outcome of COVID-19. METHODS: In a retrospective study using two independent cohorts, we investigated and validated the prevalence, kinetics and clinical correlates of hypouricemia among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 to a large academic hospital in Brussels, Belgium. Survival analyses using Cox regression and a competing risk approach assessed the time to mechanical ventilation and/or death. Confocal microscopy assessed the expression of urate transporter URAT1 in kidney proximal tubule cells from patients who died from COVID-19. RESULTS: The discovery and validation cohorts included 192 and 325 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, respectively. Out of the 517 patients, 274 (53%) had severe and 92 (18%) critical COVID-19. In both cohorts, the prevalence of hypouricemia increased from 6% upon admission to 20% within the first days of hospitalization for COVID-19, contrasting with a very rare occurrence (< 1%) before hospitalization for COVID-19. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 148 days (50-168), 61 (12%) patients required mechanical ventilation and 93 (18%) died. In both cohorts considered separately and in pooled analyses, low serum levels of uric acid were strongly associated with disease severity (linear trend, P < 0.001) and with progression to death and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in Cox (adjusted hazard ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 3.6-7.8, P < 0.001) or competing risks (adjusted hazard ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval 10.4-41.4, P < 0.001) models. At the structural level, kidneys from patients with COVID-19 showed a major reduction in urate transporter URAT1 expression in the brush border of proximal tubules. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization, low serum levels of uric acid are common and associate with disease severity and with progression to respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Uric Acid/blood , Aged , Belgium , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organic Anion Transporters/metabolism , Organic Cation Transport Proteins/metabolism , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Retrospective Studies
14.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 29(10): 1719-1730, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263114

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether obesity is independently associated with major adverse clinical outcomes and inflammatory and thrombotic markers in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality in adults with COVID-19 admitted to intensive care units across the US. Secondary outcomes were acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy (AKI-RRT), thrombotic events, and seven blood markers of inflammation and thrombosis. Unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted models were used. RESULTS: Among the 4,908 study patients, mean (SD) age was 60.9 (14.7) years, 3,095 (62.8%) were male, and 2,552 (52.0%) had obesity. In multivariable models, BMI was not associated with mortality. Higher BMI beginning at 25 kg/m2 was associated with a greater risk of ARDS and AKI-RRT but not thrombosis. There was no clinically significant association between BMI and inflammatory or thrombotic markers. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with COVID-19, higher BMI was not associated with death or thrombotic events but was associated with a greater risk of ARDS and AKI-RRT. The lack of an association between BMI and circulating biomarkers calls into question the paradigm that obesity contributes to poor outcomes in critically ill patients with COVID-19 by upregulating systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic pathways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Inflammation/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , United States/epidemiology
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4597-4602, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263097

ABSTRACT

Biological sex could affect the natural history of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. We enrolled all COVID-19 patients admitted to two COVID-19 hospitals in Milan in a prospective observational study. The primary outcome was death during the study period and the secondary outcome was critical disease at hospital admission. The association(s) between clinically relevant, noncollinear variables, and the primary outcome was assessed with uni- and multivariable Logistic regression models. A total of 520 patients were hospitalized of whom 349 (67%) were males with a median age 61 (interquartile range: 50-72). A higher proportion of males presented critically ill when compared to females (30.1% vs. 18.7%, p < .046). Death occurred in 86 (24.6%) males and 27 (15.8%) females (p = .024). In multivariable analysis age (per 10 years more) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.83 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.42-2.35], p < .0001), obesity (AOR: 2.17 [95% CI: 1.10-4.31], p = .026), critical disease at hospital admission (AOR 6.34 [95% CI: 3.50-11.48], p < .0001) were independently associated to higher odds of death whereas gender was not. In conclusion, a higher proportion of males presented critically ill at hospital admission. Age, critical disease at hospital admission, obesity, anemia, D-dimer, estimated glomerular filtration rate, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase predicted death in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Sex Ratio , Age Factors , Aged , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
16.
Mycoses ; 64(9): 1015-1027, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247256

ABSTRACT

Reports of COVID-19 associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) are rising, but the associated mortality and factors affecting it are not well-characterised. We performed a systematic review including 20 peer-reviewed English language studies reporting mortality in CAPA published till 18 February 2021from PubMed, Ovid SP, Web of Science, Embase and CINHAL. The pooled mortality in CAPA was 51.2% (95% CI: 43.1-61.1, I2  = 38%). The leave one out sensitivity analysis and influential case diagnostics revealed one outlier and its exclusion resulted in a mortality estimate of 54% (95% CI: 45-62). Higher odds of mortality: 2.83 (95% CI: 1.8-4.5) were seen in CAPA compared to controls. No significant difference in various subgroups according to the country of study, the continent of study, income category of country and quality of the included study was seen. None of the host risk factors, mycological test results, therapy for COVID-19 and antifungal therapy affected mortality. Thus, patients with CAPA have a high probability of mortality and early diagnosis with prompt therapy must be ensured to optimally manage these patients. However, more prospective studies with global and multi-centre coordination may help to address CAPA in a better way.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Cause of Death , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 47(6): 631-642, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246450

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients, including children. In recent years, it has become clear that hospitalization and critical illness bestow an increased VTE risk in pediatrics and relate to mortality and life-limiting comorbidities. For critically ill children, reported rates of VTE vary by study sampling techniques, presence of inherited or acquired thrombophilia, acute and chronic immobility, underlying illness prompting hospitalization, and clinical factors related to illness severity such as central venous catheterization, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and patient age. Accordingly, critically ill children with new signs of venous congestion, acute inflammation, or unexplained acute organ dysfunction should be routinely evaluated for VTE. This narrative review summarizes recent and historical literature regarding risk factors, prevention, presentation, treatment, and outcomes of VTE in critically ill children. In addition, we identify knowledge gaps and priorities for future collaborative research on this vital condition. Special attention is given to the clinical trial opportunities, challenges, and ongoing efforts in thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children, including those hospitalized for disease related to novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and multisystem inflammatory disease in children.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/therapy , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Child , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Disease Management , Humans , Risk Factors , Thrombolytic Therapy
18.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 21(1): 155, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The surge of critically ill patients due to the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) overwhelmed critical care capacity in areas of northern Italy. Anesthesia machines have been used as alternatives to traditional ICU mechanical ventilators. However, the outcomes for patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure cared for with Anesthesia Machines is currently unknow. We hypothesized that COVID-19 patients receiving care with Anesthesia Machines would have worse outcomes compared to standard practice. METHODS: We designed a retrospective study of patients admitted with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis at a large tertiary urban hospital in northern Italy. Two care units were included: a 27-bed standard ICU and a 15-bed temporary unit emergently opened in an operating room setting. Intubated patients assigned to Anesthesia Machines (AM group) were compared to a control cohort treated with standard mechanical ventilators (ICU-VENT group). Outcomes were assessed at 60-day follow-up. A multivariable Cox regression analysis of risk factors between survivors and non-survivors was conducted to determine the adjusted risk of death for patients assigned to AM group. RESULTS: Complete daily data from 89 mechanically ventilated patients consecutively admitted to the two units were analyzed. Seventeen patients were included in the AM group, whereas 72 were in the ICU-VENT group. Disease severity and intensity of treatment were comparable between the two groups. The 60-day mortality was significantly higher in the AM group compared to the ICU-vent group (12/17 vs. 27/72, 70.6% vs. 37.5%, respectively, p = 0.016). Allocation to AM group was associated with a significantly increased risk of death after adjusting for covariates (HR 4.05, 95% CI: 1.75-9.33, p = 0.001). Several incidents and complications were reported with Anesthesia Machine care, raising safety concerns. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the hypothesis that care associated with the use of Anesthesia Machines is inadequate to provide long-term critical care to patients with COVID-19. Added safety risks must be considered if no other option is available to treat severely ill patients during the ongoing pandemic. CLINICAL TRIAL NUMBER: Not applicable.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/instrumentation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/instrumentation , Aged , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Retrospective Studies
19.
Chest ; 160(3): 929-943, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220138

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Subphenotypes have been identified in patients with sepsis and ARDS and are associated with different outcomes and responses to therapies. RESEARCH QUESTION: Can unique subphenotypes be identified among critically ill patients with COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data from a multicenter cohort study that enrolled critically ill patients with COVID-19 from 67 hospitals across the United States, we randomly divided centers into discovery and replication cohorts. We used latent class analysis independently in each cohort to identify subphenotypes based on clinical and laboratory variables. We then analyzed the associations of subphenotypes with 28-day mortality. RESULTS: Latent class analysis identified four subphenotypes (SP) with consistent characteristics across the discovery (45 centers; n = 2,188) and replication (22 centers; n = 1,112) cohorts. SP1 was characterized by shock, acidemia, and multiorgan dysfunction, including acute kidney injury treated with renal replacement therapy. SP2 was characterized by high C-reactive protein, early need for mechanical ventilation, and the highest rate of ARDS. SP3 showed the highest burden of chronic diseases, whereas SP4 demonstrated limited chronic disease burden and mild physiologic abnormalities. Twenty-eight-day mortality in the discovery cohort ranged from 20.6% (SP4) to 52.9% (SP1). Mortality across subphenotypes remained different after adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, organ dysfunction and illness severity, regional and hospital factors. Compared with SP4, the relative risks were as follows: SP1, 1.67 (95% CI, 1.36-2.03); SP2, 1.39 (95% CI, 1.17-1.65); and SP3, 1.39 (95% CI, 1.15-1.67). Findings were similar in the replication cohort. INTERPRETATION: We identified four subphenotypes of COVID-19 critical illness with distinct patterns of clinical and laboratory characteristics, comorbidity burden, and mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Pandemics , Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
20.
Shock ; 56(6): 964-968, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endothelial and microvascular dysfunction may be a key pathogenic feature of severe COVID-19. The aim of this study was to investigate endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent skin microvascular reactivity in patients with critical COVID-19. METHODS: Twelve patients with COVID-19 treated with non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation were included in the study. We investigated skin microvascular reactivity on 2 separate days during hospitalization (study day 1 and 2) and at least 3 months after disease onset (study day 3). Twelve controls with no confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infection during 2020 were also examined. Skin perfusion was investigated through Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging before and after iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to determine the endothelial-dependent and the endothelial-independent vasodilation, respectively. RESULTS: Compared to controls, patients with critical COVID-19 had higher basal skin perfusion and reduced responses to endothelial-dependent (ACh, P = 0.002) and endothelial-independent (SNP, P = 0.01) vasodilator drugs on study day 1. In addition, the ACh/SNP ratio was significantly reduced in patients (0.50 ±â€Š0.36 vs. 0.91 ±â€Š0.49 in controls, P = 0.02). Three months after disease onset, surviving patients tended to have reduced ACh-mediated vasodilation compared to controls (P = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS: This small-sized pilot study demonstrates that critical COVID-19 infection is associated with microvascular impairment and, in particular, a markedly reduced endothelial function. Our results also suggest that microvascular function may not be fully recovered 3 months after disease onset.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Microcirculation/physiology , Regional Blood Flow/physiology , Vasodilation/physiology , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Microvessels/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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