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1.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 71(2): 11-12, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239608

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the impact on 30-day mortality with ulinastatin (ULI) used as add-on to standard of care (SOC) compared to SOC alone in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this multicentric, retrospective study, we collected data on clinical, laboratory, and outcome parameters in patients with COVID-19. Thirty-day mortality outcome was compared among patients treated with SOC alone and ULI used as add-on to SOC. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined to identify the predictors of 30-day mortality. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients were identified and enrolled in both groups with comparable baseline parameters. On univariate analysis, 30-day mortality was significantly lower in ULI plus SOC group than SOC alone group (36.2 vs 51.1%, OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.30-0.97, p = 0.040). The effect on mortality was more pronounced in patients who did not require intubation (10.9 vs 34.0%, OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.66, p = 0.006) and with early administration (within 72 hours of admission) of ULI (30.7 vs 57.9%, OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11-0.91, p = 0.032). On multivariate analysis, only intubation predicted mortality (adjusted OR 10.13, 95% CI 3.77-27.25, p<0.0001) and the effect of ULI on survival was not significant (adjusted OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.22-1.52, p = 0.270). CONCLUSION: Given the limited options for COVID-19 patients treated in ICU, early administration of ULI may be helpful, especially in patients not requiring intubation to improve the outcomes. Further, a large, randomized study is warranted to confirm these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Critical Illness/therapy , Standard of Care , Intensive Care Units
2.
Prehosp Disaster Med ; 38(3): 311-318, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237774

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic created overwhelming demand for critical care services within Maryland's (USA) hospital systems. As intensive care units (ICUs) became full, critically ill patients were boarded in hospital emergency departments (EDs), a practice associated with increased mortality and costs. Allocation of critical care resources during the pandemic requires thoughtful and proactive management strategies. While various methodologies exist for addressing the issue of ED overcrowding, few systems have implemented a state-wide response using a public safety-based platform. The objective of this report is to describe the implementation of a state-wide Emergency Medical Services (EMS)-based coordination center designed to ensure timely and equitable access to critical care. METHODS: The state of Maryland designed and implemented a novel, state-wide Critical Care Coordination Center (C4) staffed with intensivist physicians and paramedics purposed to ensure appropriate critical care resource management and patient transfer assistance. A narrative description of the C4 is provided. A retrospective cohort study design was used to present requests to the C4 as a case series report to describe the results of implementation. RESULTS: Providing a centralized asset with regional situational awareness of hospital capability and bed status played an integral role for directing the triage process of critically ill patients to appropriate facilities during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 2,790 requests were received by the C4. The pairing of a paramedic with an intensivist physician resulted in the successful transfer of 67.4% of requests, while 27.8% were managed in place with medical direction. Overall, COVID-19 patients comprised 29.5% of the cohort. Data suggested increased C4 usage was predictive of state-wide ICU surges. The C4 usage volume resulted in the expansion to pediatric services to serve a broader age range. The C4 concept, which leverages the complimentary skills of EMS clinicians and intensivist physicians, is presented as a proposed public safety-based model for other regions to consider world-wide. CONCLUSION: The C4 has played an integral role in the State of Maryland's pledge to its citizens to deliver the right care to the right patient at the right time and can be considered as a model for adoption by other regions world-wide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Maryland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Critical Care
3.
Lancet ; 401(10376): 568-576, 2023 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236778

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On the basis of low-quality evidence, international critical care nutrition guidelines recommend a wide range of protein doses. The effect of delivering high-dose protein during critical illness is unknown. We aimed to test the hypothesis that a higher dose of protein provided to critically ill patients would improve their clinical outcomes. METHODS: This international, investigator-initiated, pragmatic, registry-based, single-blinded, randomised trial was undertaken in 85 intensive care units (ICUs) across 16 countries. We enrolled nutritionally high-risk adults (≥18 years) undergoing mechanical ventilation to compare prescribing high-dose protein (≥2·2 g/kg per day) with usual dose protein (≤1·2 g/kg per day) started within 96 h of ICU admission and continued for up to 28 days or death or transition to oral feeding. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to high-dose protein or usual dose protein, stratified by site. As site personnel were involved in both prescribing and delivering protein dose, it was not possible to blind clinicians, but patients were not made aware of the treatment assignment. The primary efficacy outcome was time-to-discharge-alive from hospital up to 60 days after ICU admission and the secondary outcome was 60-day morality. Patients were analysed in the group to which they were randomly assigned regardless of study compliance, although patients who dropped out of the study before receiving the study intervention were excluded. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03160547. FINDINGS: Between Jan 17, 2018, and Dec 3, 2021, 1329 patients were randomised and 1301 (97·9%) were included in the analysis (645 in the high-dose protein group and 656 in usual dose group). By 60 days after randomisation, the cumulative incidence of alive hospital discharge was 46·1% (95 CI 42·0%-50·1%) in the high-dose compared with 50·2% (46·0%-54·3%) in the usual dose protein group (hazard ratio 0·91, 95% CI 0·77-1·07; p=0·27). The 60-day mortality rate was 34·6% (222 of 642) in the high dose protein group compared with 32·1% (208 of 648) in the usual dose protein group (relative risk 1·08, 95% CI 0·92-1·26). There appeared to be a subgroup effect with higher protein provision being particularly harmful in patients with acute kidney injury and higher organ failure scores at baseline. INTERPRETATION: Delivery of higher doses of protein to mechanically ventilated critically ill patients did not improve the time-to-discharge-alive from hospital and might have worsened outcomes for patients with acute kidney injury and high organ failure scores. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Critical Care , Critical Illness , Adult , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Hospitalization , Respiration, Artificial , Registries
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(5): e2314428, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233159

ABSTRACT

Importance: Platelet activation is a potential therapeutic target in patients with COVID-19. Objective: To evaluate the effect of P2Y12 inhibition among critically ill patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This international, open-label, adaptive platform, 1:1 randomized clinical trial included critically ill (requiring intensive care-level support) patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Patients were enrolled between February 26, 2021, through June 22, 2022. Enrollment was discontinued on June 22, 2022, by the trial leadership in coordination with the study sponsor given a marked slowing of the enrollment rate of critically ill patients. Intervention: Participants were randomly assigned to receive a P2Y12 inhibitor or no P2Y12 inhibitor (usual care) for 14 days or until hospital discharge, whichever was sooner. Ticagrelor was the preferred P2Y12 inhibitor. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was organ support-free days, evaluated on an ordinal scale that combined in-hospital death and, for participants who survived to hospital discharge, the number of days free of cardiovascular or respiratory organ support up to day 21 of the index hospitalization. The primary safety outcome was major bleeding, as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis. Results: At the time of trial termination, 949 participants (median [IQR] age, 56 [46-65] years; 603 male [63.5%]) had been randomly assigned, 479 to the P2Y12 inhibitor group and 470 to usual care. In the P2Y12 inhibitor group, ticagrelor was used in 372 participants (78.8%) and clopidogrel in 100 participants (21.2%). The estimated adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for the effect of P2Y12 inhibitor on organ support-free days was 1.07 (95% credible interval, 0.85-1.33). The posterior probability of superiority (defined as an OR > 1.0) was 72.9%. Overall, 354 participants (74.5%) in the P2Y12 inhibitor group and 339 participants (72.4%) in the usual care group survived to hospital discharge (median AOR, 1.15; 95% credible interval, 0.84-1.55; posterior probability of superiority, 80.8%). Major bleeding occurred in 13 participants (2.7%) in the P2Y12 inhibitor group and 13 (2.8%) in the usual care group. The estimated mortality rate at 90 days for the P2Y12 inhibitor group was 25.5% and for the usual care group was 27.0% (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.76-1.23; P = .77). Conclusions and Relevance: In this randomized clinical trial of critically ill participants hospitalized for COVID-19, treatment with a P2Y12 inhibitor did not improve the number of days alive and free of cardiovascular or respiratory organ support. The use of the P2Y12 inhibitor did not increase major bleeding compared with usual care. These data do not support routine use of a P2Y12 inhibitor in critically ill patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04505774.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Agonists , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Critical Illness/therapy , Hemorrhage , Hospital Mortality , Ticagrelor/therapeutic use , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Agonists/therapeutic use
6.
Crit Care Clin ; 39(3): 465-477, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241898

ABSTRACT

Brain dysfunction during critical illness (ie, delirium and coma) is extremely common, and its lasting effect has only become increasingly understood in the last two decades. Brain dysfunction in the intensive care unit (ICU) is an independent predictor of both increased mortality and long-term impairments in cognition among survivors. As critical care medicine has grown, important insights regarding brain dysfunction in the ICU have shaped our practice including the importance of light sedation and the avoidance of deliriogenic drugs such as benzodiazepines. Best practices are now strategically incorporated in targeted bundles of care like the ICU Liberation Campaign's ABCDEF Bundle.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Intensive Care Units , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Critical Care , Coma , Brain
7.
Crit Care ; 27(1): 186, 2023 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325371

ABSTRACT

Critical illness is a continuum, but patient care is often fragmented. Value-based critical care focuses on the overall health of the patient, not on an episode of care. The "ICU without borders" model incorporates a concept where members of the critical care team are involved in the management of patients from the onset of critical illness until recovery and beyond. In this paper, we summarise the potential benefits and challenges to patients, families, staff and the wider healthcare system and list some essential requirements, including a tight governance framework, advanced technologies, investment and trust. We also argue that "ICU without borders" should be viewed as a bi-directional model, allowing extended visiting hours, giving patients and families direct access to experienced critical care staff and offering mutual aid when needed.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Intensive Care Units , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Critical Care
9.
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 149(4): 334-343, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318728

ABSTRACT

Importance: Obesity has traditionally been described as a relative contraindication to percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT). Increased familiarity with the technique and use of bronchoscopy or real-time ultrasonography to enhance visualization have led many practitioners to expand the indication for PDT to patients historically deemed to have high risk of perioperative complications. Objective: To assess the reported complication rate of PDT in critically ill adults with obesity and compare it with that of open surgical tracheostomies (OSTs) in this patient population and with that of PDT in their counterparts without obesity. Data Sources: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from January 1, 2000, to March 1, 2022. Key terms related to percutaneous tracheostomy and obesity were included. Study Selection: Original investigations of critically ill adult patients (age ≥18 years) with obesity who underwent PDT that reported at least 1 complication of interest were included. Case reports or series with fewer than 5 patients were excluded, as were studies in a language other than English or French. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) were used, with independent extraction by multiple observers. Frequencies were reported for all dichotomous variables. Relative risks for complications were calculated using both fixed-effects and random-effects models in the meta-analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Main outcomes included mortality directly associated with the procedure, conversion to OST, and complications associated with the procedure (subclassified into life-threatening or non-life-threatening adverse events). Results: Eighteen studies were included in the systematic review, comprising 1355 patients with obesity who underwent PDT. The PDT-related complication rate was 16.6% among patients with obesity overall (791 patients, 17 studies), most of which were non-life-threatening. Only 0.6% of cases (8 of 1314 patients, 17 studies) were aborted or converted to an OST. A meta-analysis of 12 studies (N = 4212; 1078 with obesity and 3134 without obesity) showed that patients with obesity had a higher rate of complications associated with PDT compared with their counterparts without obesity (risk ratio, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.38-2.28). A single study compared PDT with OST directly for critically ill adults with obesity; thus, the intended meta-analysis could not be performed in this subgroup. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings suggest that the rate of complications of PDT is low in critically ill individuals with obesity, although the risk of complications may be higher than in individuals without obesity.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Tracheostomy , Humans , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , Tracheostomy/methods , Critical Illness/therapy , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Obesity/complications , Bronchoscopy/methods
10.
Nutr Clin Pract ; 38(3): 602-608, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Enteral nutrition is essential to improve outcomes in patients who are critically ill. Patients in the prone position, including those diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) present additional challenges for enteral nutrition initiation. METHODS: A novel technique for placing feeding tubes while in the prone position was developed using an electromagnetic placement device and specialty trained clinical nurse specialists. Data were assessed retrospectively to determine effectiveness of this new practice. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients had feeding tubes placed while in the prone position; 75% were able to be placed through the postpyloric route, 22% were placed through the gastric route, and 3% unable to be placed. Use of this technique facilitated earlier initiation of feedings by 2 days from time of admission and almost half a day from intubation to feeding. There was no additional radiation exposure from using this technique. CONCLUSION: Ability to place feeding tubes early while patients were prone reduced delays for starting enteral nutrition. Patients with COVID-19 in the prone position were able to receive effective nutrition support earlier with no additional complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Enteral Nutrition , Humans , Enteral Nutrition/methods , Prone Position , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/therapy , Intubation, Gastrointestinal/methods , Critical Illness/therapy
11.
J Infect ; 87(2): 120-127, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317569

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, influenza was the most frequent cause of viral respiratory pneumonia requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Few studies have compared the characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19 and influenza. METHODS: This was a French nationwide study comparing COVID-19 (March 1, 2020-June 30, 2021) and influenza patients (January 1, 2014-December 31, 2019) admitted to an ICU during pre-vaccination era. Primary outcome was in-hospital death. Secondary outcome was need for mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: 105,979 COVID-19 patients were compared to 18,763 influenza patients. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 were more likely to be men with more comorbidities. Patients with influenza required more invasive mechanical ventilation (47 vs. 34%, p < 0·001), vasopressors (40% vs. 27, p < 0·001) and renal-replacement therapy (22 vs. 7%, p < 0·001). Hospital mortality was 25% and 21% (p < 0·001) in patients with COVID-19 and influenza, respectively. In the subgroup of patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation, ICU length of stay was significantly longer in patients with COVID-19 (18 [10-32] vs. 15 [8-26] days, p < 0·001). Adjusting for age, gender, comorbidities, and modified SAPS II score, in-hospital death was higher in COVID-19 patients (adjusted sub-distribution hazard ratio [aSHR]=1.69; 95%CI=1.63-1.75) compared with influenza patients. COVID-19 was also associated with less invasive mechanical ventilation (aSHR=0.87; 95%CI=0.85-0.89) and a higher likelihood of death without invasive mechanical ventilation (aSHR=2.40; 95%CI=2.24-2.57). CONCLUSION: Despite younger age and lower SAPS II score, critically ill COVID-19 patients had a longer hospital stay and higher mortality than patients with influenza.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Pneumonia, Viral , Male , Humans , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospital Mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies
12.
Med J Aust ; 218(10): 458-459, 2023 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317393
13.
Nutrients ; 15(9)2023 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314708

ABSTRACT

Administering N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could counteract the effect of free radicals, improving the clinical evolution of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This study aimed to investigate the clinical and biochemical effects of administering NAC to critically ill patients with COVID-19. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on ICU patients (n = 140) with COVID-19 and divided into two groups: patients treated with NAC (NAC-treated group) and patients without NAC treatment (control group). NAC was administered as a continuous infusion with a loading dose and a maintenance dose during the study period (from admission until the third day of ICU stay). NAC-treated patients showed higher PaO2/FiO2 (p ≤ 0.014) after 3 days in ICU than their control group counterparts. Moreover, C-reactive protein (p ≤ 0.001), D-dimer (p ≤ 0.042), and lactate dehydrogenase (p ≤ 0.001) levels decreased on the third day in NAC-treated patients. Glutathione concentrations decreased in both NAC-treated (p ≤ 0.004) and control (p ≤ 0.047) groups after 3 days in ICU; whereas glutathione peroxidase did not change during the ICU stay. The administration of NAC manages to improve the clinical and analytical response of seriously ill patients with COVID-19 compared to the control group. NAC is able to stop the decrease in glutathione concentrations.


Subject(s)
Acetylcysteine , COVID-19 , Humans , Acetylcysteine/therapeutic use , Critical Illness/therapy , Glutathione , Dietary Supplements
14.
Trials ; 23(1): 533, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family members of critically ill patients face considerable uncertainty and distress during their close others' intensive care unit (ICU) stay. About 20-60% of family members experience adverse mental health outcomes post-ICU, such as symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Guidelines recommend structured family inclusion, communication, and support, but the existing evidence base around protocolized family support interventions is modest and requires substantiation. METHODS: To test the clinical effectiveness and explore the implementation of a multicomponent, nurse-led family support intervention in ICUs, we will undertake a parallel, cluster-randomized, controlled, multicenter superiority hybrid-type 1 trial. It will include eight clusters (ICUs) per study arm, with a projected total sample size of 896 family members of adult, critically ill patients treated in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. The trial targets family members of critically ill patients with an expected ICU stay of 48 h or longer. Families in the intervention arm will receive a family support intervention in addition to usual care. The intervention consists of specialist nurse support that is mapped to the patient pathway with follow-up care and includes psycho-educational and relationship-focused family interventions, and structured, interprofessional communication, and shared decision-making with families. Families in the control arm will receive usual care. The primary study endpoint is quality of family care, operationalized as family members' satisfaction with ICU care at discharge. Secondary endpoints include quality of communication and nurse support, family management of critical illness (functioning, resilience), and family members' mental health (well-being, psychological distress) measured at admission, discharge, and after 3, 6, and 12 months. Data of all participants, regardless of protocol adherence, will be analyzed using linear mixed-effects models, with the individual participant as the unit of inference. DISCUSSION: This trial will examine the effectiveness of the family support intervention and generate knowledge of its implementability. Both types of evidence are necessary to determine whether the intervention works as intended in clinical practice and could be scaled up to other ICUs. The study findings will make a significant contribution to the current body of knowledge on effective ICU care that promotes family participation and well-being. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05280691 . Prospectively registered on 20 February 2022.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Ficus , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/prevention & control , Critical Illness/therapy , Family/psychology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
15.
Semin Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 27(2): 87-96, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312335

ABSTRACT

The past year in critical care medicine was notable for ongoing sequelae of the COVID-19 pandemic, including nationwide shortages and critical care demand in many regions in excess of usual operating capacity. Despite these challenges, evidence-based medicine and investigations into the optimal management of the critically ill continued to be at the forefront. This article is a collection of studies published in 2022 which are specifically relevant to cardiothoracic critical care. These noteworthy publications add to the existing literature across a broad spectrum of topics, from optimal timing of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), delirium prevention, updates in nutrition guidelines, alternative defibrillation techniques, novel ventilator management, and observing the downstream psychological impact of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Disease Progression , Critical Illness/therapy
17.
Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr (Engl Ed) ; 70(4): 245-254, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307842

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In 2020 the pandemic caused by SARS-COV-2 demanded an enormous number of healthcare resources in order to guarantee adequate treatment and support for those patients. This study aims to assess caloric and protein intake and evaluate its associations with relevant clinical outcomes in critically ill with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: A nationwide, multicentre prospective observational study including twelve Argentinian intensive care units (ICUs,) was conducted between March and October 2020. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Adult ICU patients>18 years admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 diagnosis and mechanical ventilation for at least 48h. Statistical analysis was carried out using IBM-SPSS© 24 programme. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-five patients were included in the study. Those who died had lower protein intake (0.73g/kg/day (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.75 vs 0.97g/kg/day (CI 0.95-0.99), P<0.001), and lower caloric intake than those who survived (12.94kcal/kg/day (CI 12.48-13.39) vs 16.47kcal/kg/day (CI 16.09-16.8), P<0.001). A model was built, and logistic regression showed that factors associated with the probability of achieving caloric and protein intake, were the early start of nutritional support, modified NUTRIC score higher than five points, and undernutrition (Subjective Global Assessment B or C). The patients that underwent mechanical ventilation in a prone position present less caloric and protein intake, similar to those with APACHE II>18. CONCLUSIONS: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 associated respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation who died in ICU had less caloric and protein intake than those who survived. Early start on nutritional support and undernutrition increased the opportunity to achieve protein and caloric goals, whereas the severity of disease and mechanical ventilation in the prone position decreased the chance to reach caloric and protein targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Adult , Humans , Critical Illness/therapy , Argentina , COVID-19 Testing , SARS-CoV-2 , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Malnutrition/etiology , Malnutrition/therapy
20.
J Crit Care ; 75: 154279, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292642

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Fatigue is a common symptom after critical illness. However, evidence-based interventions for fatigue after critical illness are lacking. We aimed to identify interventions to support self-management of fatigue caused by physical conditions and assess their effectiveness and suitability for adaptation for those with fatigue after critical illness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an umbrella review of systematic reviews. Databases included CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index (BNI), Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), JBI Evidence Synthesis Database, and PROSPERO register. Included reviews were appraised using the JBI Checklist for Systematic Reviews and Research Syntheses. Results were summarised narratively. RESULTS: Of the 672 abstracts identified, 10 met the inclusion criteria. Reviews focused on cancer (n = 8), post-viral fatigue (n = 1), and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) (n = 1). Primary studies often did not address core elements of self-management. Positive outcomes were reported across all reviews, and interventions involving facilitator support appeared to be most effective. CONCLUSIONS: Self-management can be effective at reducing fatigue symptoms and improving quality of life for physical conditions and has clear potential for supporting people with fatigue after critical illness, but more conclusive data on effectiveness and clearer definitions of self-management are required.


Subject(s)
Self-Management , Humans , Adult , Critical Illness/therapy , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/therapy
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