Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 211
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 104, 2020 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-672011

ABSTRACT

From December 25, 2019 to January 31, 2020, 33 cases of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were identified in the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, China, yet none of the affiliated HCWs was infected. Here we analyzed the infection control measures used in three different departments in the Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and correlated the measures with the corresponding infection data of HCWs affiliated with these departments. We found that three infection control measures, namely the isolation of the presumed positive patients, the use of facemasks and intensified hand hygiene play important roles in preventing nosocomial transmission of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/physiology , China , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Young Adult
2.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 15(1): 279, 2020 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: According to the required reorganization of all hospital activities, the recent COVID-19 pandemic had dramatic consequences on the orthopedic world. We think that informing the orthopedic community about the strategy that we adopted both in our hospital and in our Department of Orthopedics could be useful, particularly for those who are facing the pandemic later than Italy. METHODS: Changes were done in our hospital by medical direction to reallocate resources to COVID-19 patients. In the Orthopedic Department, a decrease in the number of beds and surgical activity was stabilized. Since March 13, it has been avoided to perform elective surgery, and since March 16, non-urgent outpatient consultations were abolished. This activity reduction was associated with careful evaluation of staff and patients: extensive periodical swab testing of all healthcare staff and swab testing of all surgical patients were applied. RESULTS: These restrictions determined an overall reduction of all our surgical activities of 30% compared to 2019. We also had a reduction in outpatient clinic activities and admissions to the orthopedic emergency unit. Extensive swab testing has proven successful: of more than 160 people tested in our building, only three COVID-19 positives were found, and of over more than 200 surgical procedures, only two positive patients were found. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive swab test of all people (even if asymptomatic) and proactive tracing and quarantining of potential COVID-19 positive patients may diminish the virus spread.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Emergencies , Health Care Reform/organization & administration , Hospitalization , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/organization & administration , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration
4.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(2): 447-451, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661781

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitates aggressive infection mitigation strategies to reduce the risk to patients and healthcare providers. This document is intended to provide a framework for the adult cardiac surgeon to consider in this rapidly changing environment. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative detailed protective measures are outlined. These are guidance recommendations during a pandemic surge to be used for all patients while local COVID-19 disease burden remains elevated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Heart Diseases/surgery , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Recovery Room/standards , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Cross Infection/virology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Health/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Virulence
5.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 43(6): 332-347, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-658769

ABSTRACT

The set of measures proposed by SEPD, AEEH, GETECCU and AEG are aimed to help departments in their resumption of usual activity. We have prepared a number of practical recommendations regarding patient management and the stepwise resumption of healthcare activity. These recommendations are based on the sparse, changing evidence available, and will be updated in the future according to daily needs and the availability of expendable materials to suit them; in each department they will be implemented depending upon the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in each region, and the burden the pandemic has represented for each hospital. The general objectives of these recommendations include: (a)To protect our patients against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and to provide them with high-quality care. (b)To protect all healthcare professionals against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2. (c)To resume normal functioning of our departments in a setting of ongoing risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Appointments and Schedules , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Diagnostic Techniques, Digestive System/instrumentation , Digestive System Diseases/complications , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/therapy , Disinfection , Drug Interactions , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Liver Transplantation , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , Symptom Assessment , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Universal Precautions
7.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720943331, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657340

ABSTRACT

The experiences of these recent months have left us with as many new questions as they have given us new solutions. The main question that infection prevention and control department is having these days is "Why have hospital-associated infections (HAIs) reduced during COVID-19 pandemic?" What is the one unique strategy that has brought decline in increasing HAIs? Would it be appropriate to say that rigorous hand hygiene practices among health care workers (HCWs) have reduced HAIs in a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan? This commentary is written to understand the effect of rigorous hand hygiene among HCWs on number of HAIs during COVID-19 pandemic. Given the seriousness of this outbreak, it was observed that the hand hygiene has occupied a new place of importance in the minds of HCWs. We observed 4 times increase in the consumption of hand sanitizers after COVID-19 outbreak. The increased consumption of hand sanitizers was reflected in improved hand hygiene practices. A reduction was observed in the number of HAIs after the COVID-19 outbreak, and we assume that the dip in HAIs is associated with the improvement in hand hygiene practices in the recent months. In the wake of COVID-19 pandemic, these trends reassure us that hand hygiene compliance by HCWs alone can be effective in reducing HAIs in a hospital setting.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Pakistan/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Tertiary Care Centers
8.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 20(1): 177, 2020 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656789

ABSTRACT

The management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) secondary to the novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) proves to be challenging and controversial. Multiple studies have suggested the likelihood of an atypical pathophysiology to explain the spectrum of pulmonary and systemic manifestations caused by the virus. The principal paradox of COVID-19 pneumonia is the presence of severe hypoxemia with preserved pulmonary mechanics. Data derived from the experience of multiple centers around the world have demonstrated that initial clinical efforts should be focused into avoid intubation and mechanical ventilation in hypoxemic COVID-19 patients. On the other hand, COVID-19 patients progressing or presenting into frank ARDS with typical decreased pulmonary compliance, represents another clinical enigma to many clinicians, since routine therapeutic interventions for ARDS are still a subject of debate.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/metabolism , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Cytokines/metabolism , Diagnostic Imaging , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Humans , Hypoxia/virology , Immune System Diseases/virology , Intubation, Intratracheal , Neuromuscular Blockade/methods , Pandemics , Patient Positioning/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prone Position/physiology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/virology , Thrombophilia/virology , Vasodilator Agents/therapeutic use
9.
Chin Med Sci J ; 35(2): 114-120, 2020 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656608

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus that emerged in late 2019 rapidly spread around the world. Most severe cases need endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, and some mild cases may need emergent surgery under general anesthesia. The novel coronavirus was reported to transmit via droplets, contact and natural aerosols from human to human. Therefore, aerosol-producing procedures such as endotracheal intubation and airway suction may put the healthcare providers at high risk of nosocomial infection. Based on recently published articles, this review provides detailed feasible recommendations for primary anesthesiologists on infection prevention in operating room during COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anesthesiologists/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/standards , Operating Rooms/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
10.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e154, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-650362

ABSTRACT

There is limited information concerning the viral load of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in aerosols deposited on environmental surfaces and the effectiveness of infection prevention and control procedures on eliminating SARS-CoV-2 contamination in hospital settings. We examined the concentration of SARS-CoV-2 in aerosol samples and on environmental surfaces in a hospital designated for treating severe COVID-19 patients. Aerosol samples were collected by a microbial air sampler, and environmental surfaces were sampled using sterile premoistened swabs at multiple sites. Ninety surface swabs and 135 aerosol samples were collected. Only two swabs, sampled from the inside of a patient's mask, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. All other swabs and aerosol samples were negative for the virus. Our study indicated that strict implementation of infection prevention and control procedures was highly effective in eliminating aerosol and environmental borne SARS-CoV-2 RNA thereby reducing the risk of cross-infection in hospitals.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Aerosols , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Cross Infection/virology , Environment , Environmental Microbiology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Masks/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
11.
J Int Med Res ; 48(7): 300060520939337, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647487

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe the emergency responses to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) for pregnant patients at our hospital and their effect on hospital operations and patients' outcomes. METHODS: We developed strategies to prevent hospital-associated transmission of COVID-19 in obstetric care. Infrastructure, including the fever clinic and wards, were modified. Outpatient volume was controlled and screening processes were strictly performed. Verification of the virus was compulsory for non-surgery and non-emergency patients. Emergency operations were performed in a negative pressure theater with surgeons fully protected. Outcomes were analyzed and the patients' characteristics were evaluated. The effect of intervention on depressed and anxious patients was assessed. Data from the first 2 months of 2019 and 2020 were compared. RESULTS: No in-hospital COVID-19 infections occurred in our unit. During the epidemic, patient volume significantly decreased. While major characteristics of patients were similar, a higher prevalence of gestational hypertension was found in 2020 than in 2019. Psychological interventions showed optimistic effects in ameliorating depression and anxiety at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our strategies were effective in preventing in-hospital infection of COVID-19 and reassuring women about the safety of pregnancy. Monitoring and managing psychological issues were necessary during this critical period.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Adult , Anxiety/complications , Body Temperature , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/complications , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Obstetrics/trends , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Outpatients , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Telemedicine/trends , Young Adult
12.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(3)2020 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-642206

ABSTRACT

To the Editor, The new pandemic COVID -19 caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a global threat. So far, more than 11 million infections and more than five hundred thousand deaths have been reported worldwide. In India the number of cases as of 5th July, 2020 is 6,73,165 with 19,268 deaths. Health care workers (HCWs) have been the backbone of this pandemic since the very beginning...


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Developing Countries , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Cross Infection/virology , Developing Countries/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
13.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 35: 101704, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile phones have become an integral part of modern society. As possible breeding grounds for microbial organisms, these constitute a potential global public health risk for microbial transmission. OBJECTIVE: Scoping review of literature examining microbial's presence on mobile phones in both health care (HC) and community settings. METHODS: A search (PubMed&GoogleScholar) was conducted from January 2005-December 2019 to identify English language studies. Studies were included if samples from mobile phones were tested for bacteria, fungi, and/or viruses; and if the sampling was carried out in any HC setting, and/or within the general community. Any other studies exploring mobile phones that did not identify specific microorganisms were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 56 studies were included (from 24 countries). Most studies identified the presence of bacteria (54/56), while 16 studies reported the presence of fungi. One study focused solely on RNA viruses. Staphylococcus aureus, and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci were the most numerous identified organisms present on mobile phones. These two species and Escherichia coli were present in over a third of studies both in HC and community samples. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Acinetobacter sp., and Bacillus sp. were present in over a third of the studies in HC settings. CONCLUSIONS: While this scoping review of literature regarding microbial identification on mobile phones in HC and community settings did not directly address the issue of SARS-CoV-2 responsible for COVID-19, this work exposes the possible role of mobile phones as a 'Trojan horse' contributing to the transmission of microbial infections in epidemics and pandemics.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Community-Acquired Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/microbiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Decontamination , Disinfection , Health Personnel , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Residence Characteristics
14.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(26): e246, 2020 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634802

ABSTRACT

There is still a paucity of studies on real-world outcome of screening clinic for hospital protection from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As the number of COVID-19 cases was growing rapidly in Daegu, Korea, we started operating an active screening clinic outside the hospital premises. Over two weeks, 2,087 patients were screened using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, with 42 confirmed cases. Before the screening clinic period, an average of 36 beds (maximum 67 beds) per day were closed due to unrecognized COVID-19 patients entering the hospital. In contrast, after the screening clinic operated well, only one event of closing emergency room (25 beds) occurred due to a confirmed COVID-19 case of asymptomatic patient. We report the operational process of screening clinic for COVID-19 and its effectiveness in maintaining the function of tertiary hospitals.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Mass Screening/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Republic of Korea , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(7): 855-864, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628858

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reduced radiology volumes across the country as providers have decreased elective care to minimize the spread of infection and free up health care delivery system capacity. After the stay-at-home order was issued in our county, imaging volumes at our institution decreased to approximately 46% of baseline volumes, similar to the experience of other radiology practices. Given the substantial differences in severity and timing of the disease in different geographic regions, estimating resumption of radiology volumes will be one of the next major challenges for radiology practices. We hypothesize that there are six major variables that will likely predict radiology volumes: (1) severity of disease in the local region, including potential subsequent "waves" of infection; (2) lifting of government social distancing restrictions; (3) patient concern regarding risk of leaving home and entering imaging facilities; (4) management of pent-up demand for imaging delayed during the acute phase of the pandemic, including institutional capacity; (5) impact of the economic downturn on health insurance and ability to pay for imaging; and (6) radiology practice profile reflecting amount of elective imaging performed, including type of patients seen by the radiology practice such as emergency, inpatient, outpatient mix and subspecialty types. We encourage radiology practice leaders to use these and other relevant variables to plan for the coming weeks and to work collaboratively with local health system and governmental leaders to help ensure that needed patient care is restored as quickly as the environment will safely permit.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Management, Medical/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Workload , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(26): 825-829, 2020 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628016

ABSTRACT

In the United States, approximately 180,000 patients receive mental health services each day at approximately 4,000 inpatient and residential psychiatric facilities (1). SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), can spread rapidly within congregate residential settings (2-4), including psychiatric facilities. On April 13, 2020, two patients were transferred to Wyoming's state psychiatric hospital from a private psychiatric hospital that had confirmed COVID-19 cases among its residents and staff members (5). Although both patients were asymptomatic at the time of transfer and one had a negative test result for SARS-CoV-2 at the originating facility, they were both isolated and received testing upon arrival at the state facility. On April 16, 2020, the test results indicated that both patients had SARS-CoV-2 infection. In response, the state hospital implemented expanded COVID-19 infection prevention and control (IPC) procedures (e.g., enhanced screening, testing, and management of new patient admissions) and adapted some standard IPC measures to facilitate implementation within the psychiatric patient population (e.g., use of modified face coverings). To assess the likely effectiveness of these procedures and determine SARS-CoV-2 infection prevalence among patients and health care personnel (HCP) (6) at the state hospital, a point prevalence survey was conducted. On May 1, 2020, 18 days after the patients' arrival, 46 (61%) of 76 patients and 171 (61%) of 282 HCP had nasopharyngeal swabs collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. All patients and HCP who received testing had negative test results, suggesting that the hospital's expanded IPC strategies might have been effective in preventing the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection within the facility. In congregate residential settings, prompt identification of COVID-19 cases and application of strong IPC procedures are critical to ensuring the protection of other patients and staff members. Although standard guidance exists for other congregate facilities (7) and for HCP in general (8), modifications and nonstandard solutions might be needed to account for the specific needs of psychiatric facilities, their patients, and staff members.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Mass Screening , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Residential Facilities , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Wyoming/epidemiology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(12)2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623029

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a member of the family of coronaviruses. The first cases were recorded in Wuhan, China, between December 2019 and January 2020. Italy is one of the most affected countries in Europe. COVID-19 is a new challenge in modern dentistry. New guidelines are required in dental clinics to avoid contagion caused by cross-infections. A narrative review was performed using both primary sources, such as scientific articles and secondary ones, such as bibliographic indexes, web pages, and databases. The main search engines were PubMed, SciELO, and Google Scholar. Twelve articles were selected to develop the bibliographic review by applying pre-established inclusion and exclusion criteria. Precautionary measures should be applied to control COVID-19 in clinical practice. Several authors have highlighted the importance of telephone triage and/or clinic questionnaires, body temperature measurement, usage of personal protective equipment, surface disinfection with ethanol between 62% and 71%, high-speed instruments equipped with an anti-retraction system, four-handed work, and large-volume cannulas for aspiration. Clinically, the use of a rubber dam is essential. FFP2 (or N95) and FFP3 respirators, if compared to surgical masks, provide greater protection for health workers against viral respiratory infections. Further accurate studies are needed to confirm this.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Dentistry , Infection Control/standards , Occupational Health , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Dentists'/statistics & numerical data
20.
Int Nurs Rev ; 67(2): 157-159, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612617

ABSTRACT

As the world tackles the largest public health event in more than a century, the COVID-19 pandemic, the true value of nursing is being seen by politicians and the public. But while nurses are being praised for the vital work they do, many are being put into high-risk situations, and some have died, because of a shortage of appropriate, high-quality personal protective equipment. The International Council of Nurses has called for governments to make the provision of such equipment their number one priority to prevent further loss of life among the nurses caring for the world's most vulnerable patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Humans , International Cooperation , International Council of Nurses , Nurse's Role , Occupational Diseases/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Universal Precautions/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL