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1.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 254-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470682

ABSTRACT

Sleep problems among frontline medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic require attention. A total of 249 frontline medical staff who were recruited to support Wuhan completed this cross-sectional study. A web-based questionnaire about insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue was used to assess mental health status. The prevalence of sleep disorders among frontline medical staff was 50.6%. More time spent in Wuhan and a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were associated with a higher risk of insomnia. People who stayed in Wuhan for a long time with a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue symptoms might be at high risk of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , China , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
2.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(10): 2021-2025.e1, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466577

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To inform future policies and disaster preparedness plans in the vulnerable nursing home setting, we need greater insight into the relationship between nursing homes' (NHs') quality and the spread and severity of COVID-19 in NH facilities. We therefore extend current evidence on the relationships between NH quality and resident COVID-19 infection rates and deaths, taking into account NH structural characteristics and community characteristics. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 15,390 Medicaid- and Medicare-certified NHs. METHODS: We obtained and merged the following data sets: (1) COVID-19 weekly data reported by each nursing home to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network, (2) Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Five Star Quality Rating System, (3) county-level COVID-19 case counts, (4) county-level population data, and (5) county-level sociodemographic data. RESULTS: Among 1-star NHs, there were an average of 13.19 cases and 2.42 deaths per 1000 residents per week between May 25 and December 20, 2020. Among 5-star NHs, there were an average of 9.99 cases and 1.83 deaths per 1000 residents per week. The rate of confirmed cases of COVID-19 was 31% higher among 1-star NHs compared with 5-star NHs [model 1: incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.39], and the rate of COVID-19 deaths was 30% higher (IRR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20, 1.41). These associations were only partially explained by differences in community spread of COVID-19, case mix, and the for-profit status and size of NHs. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: We found that COVID-19 case and death rates were substantially higher among NHs with lower star ratings, suggesting that NHs with quality much below average are more susceptible to the spread of COVID-19. This relationship, particularly with regard to case rates, can be partially attributed to external factors: lower-rated NHs are often located in areas with greater COVID-19 community spread and serve more socioeconomically vulnerable residents than higher-rated NHs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Medicare , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
4.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 50(9): 703-711, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464250

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccination remains a key strategy to living endemically with COVID-19. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine was first granted interim authorisation for use in Singapore in December 2020. With overseas studies published about the safety and side effect profiles of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines focusing mainly on non-Asian populations, we described the side effects of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination experienced by the healthcare workers (HCWs) in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Occupational Health Clinic (OHC) at the National University Hospital in Singapore, which monitored staff for any adverse effects within 30 minutes post vaccination on-site and any adverse effects after that. A cross-sectional study among the vaccinated HCWs was conducted using an online survey, which established basic demographics, histories of allergies or atopic disorders, and adverse events encountered after dose 1 and dose 2 of vaccination. RESULTS: No anaphylaxis was reported. Most common symptom was giddiness (32.7%) experienced by HCWs within 30 minutes. Adverse events attended post-vaccination by OHC were generally mild and self-limiting. From the survey, odds of experiencing an adverse event after dose 2 was significantly higher than after the first dose, especially for fever/chills (odds ratio [OR] 22.5). Fever/chills, injection site reactions, headache, aches and pains, and feeling unwell were significantly more common in HCWs below 60 years compared to those ≥60 years. An allergy to food (adjusted OR 2.7) and a history of eczema/sensitive skin (adjusted OR 2.6) were associated with a skin reaction not at injection site. CONCLUSION: The side effects experienced after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines are generally self-limiting and mild, with no anaphylaxis reported.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Vaccination
5.
Aust J Gen Pract ; 50(9): 668-672, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Adopting healthy lifestyle pillars promotes longer lives free from major chronic diseases. The COVID-19 pandemic imposed behavioural changes and psychological burdens. The aim of this study was to assess changes in medical students' six lifestyle pillars that were imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included 548 Brazilian medical students' digitally collected demographic data and lifestyle characteristics from before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: The pandemic had a neutral impact on sleep quality and a predominantly negative impact on interpersonal relationships, exercise and eating. Approximately 67.5% students decreased their tobacco and alcohol use. Spirituality was maintained at 66%. Those who reported having emotional wellbeing (27.9%) during the pandemic fulfilled a higher number of pre-pandemic lifestyle pillars (median [IQR]) when compared with those who reported an absence of wellbeing (4 [3-4] pillars, compared with 3 [2-4], P = 0.006). DISCUSSION: The results reinforce the importance of adhering to as many lifestyle pillars as possible to preserve emotional wellbeing during periods of stress such as those experienced during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Life Style , Mental Health , Students, Medical , Brazil , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology
6.
J Med Life ; 14(4): 523-530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464169

ABSTRACT

Hemodialysis is a necessary treatment for end-stage kidney disease patients. It imposes undergoing three sessions of dialysis per week in a specialized center. Amid the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, precautionary measures were mandatory in all dialysis facilities and may have negatively impacted patients' well-being. This study aimed to uncover the scale of this effect. We performed a cross-sectional study of all patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis in two dialysis units (one urban and another rural). Patients with Alzheimer's disease were excluded. Patients filled a questionnaire including information on socio-demographics, factors related to the dialysis facility, and the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on their mental health. A total of 72 patients responded. Their median age was 70 (60.79) years. Of them, 68% were males, 71% were married, and 10% were living alone. Following the pandemic, 35% felt more anxious, with a higher incidence of anxiety in the rural unit (p=0.021). Half of them felt very limited in their relationships, and 29% were isolated from their families. In total, 98% of patients were satisfied with the staff support. The imposed preventive measures were perceived as very strict in 27% of the surveyed patients. The majority of the urban group were bothered for not eating during the session, and they felt significantly more stress than the rural group (p=0.001). The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic increased anxiety among hemodialysis patients from a rural setting. Stress was more prevalent in the urban group and most probably related to limitations in eating during sessions. The majority were satisfied with staff support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis
7.
J Med Life ; 14(4): 468-480, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464168

ABSTRACT

The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought unprecedented changes in the way conventional health care is delivered. This study examined if clinicians' perceptions regarding telemedicine and its barriers to implementation in Malaysia have changed during this pandemic. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Malaysian medical doctors of various specialties in four urban healthcare facilities between June 2020 and July 2020. A total of 146 (41.7%) out of 350 responses were obtained. 62% of doctors reported a reduction greater than 50% in outpatient visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of doctors either found telemedicine useful in situations similar to COVID-19 (34.2%) or that it is essential to their daily practice (42.5%). However, only 22% reported using telemedicine for consultation during the COVID-19 pandemic. 74% of doctors felt that telemedicine would only benefit up to 30% of their patient population. Significantly more female doctors (80%) felt that telemedicine would benefit their patients compared to male doctors (45.8%) (P=0.03). Physicians (51.3%) were more inclined to adopt telemedicine in comparison to surgeons (32.4%) (P=0.03). The majority cited medico-legal issues and consent (80.6%), billing and charges (66.7%) and insurance reimbursement (62.5%), technical difficulties (62.5%) as their barrier to the adoption of telemedicine. Female doctors and physicians were more willing to adopt telemedicine when compared to male doctors and surgeons. Although the COVID-19 pandemic appeared to improve the perception, significant barriers should be resolved before many can incorporate it into their practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 55(9): 1149-1152, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463876

ABSTRACT

To investigate whether the laboratory specimens preserved in Beijing Hospital Biobank during a specific period had been contaminated by SARS-Cov-2 through a cross-sectional study, and to establish a retrospective biobank safety screening system. Laboratory specimens were collected from the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and the Fever Clinic of Beijing Hospital from November 1, 2019 to January 22, 2020, nucleic acid and serological antibody testing were performed for SARS-CoV-2 in these specimens (including 79 serum, 20 urine, 42 feces and 21 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens). The safety of the stored samples during this period was defined by negative and positive results. Both the nucleic acid test and serological antibody test showed negative for SARS-CoV-2, indicating that these specimens were safely stored in the biobank. High-risk specimens collected in our hospital during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak are free of SARS-CoV-2, and a safety screening strategy for the clinical biobank is established to ensure the biosafety of these samples.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 55(9): 1059-1066, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463875

ABSTRACT

Objective: To study the characteristics and risk factors of psychological and behavioral problems of children and adolescents of different ages and genders in long-term home-schooling during the coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic. Further, to provide scientific basis for more targeted psychological intervention and coping strategies in the future. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was conducted on students aged 6-16 years old in five representative cities of North (Beijing), East (Shanghai), West (Chongqing), South (Guangzhou) and Middle (Wuhan) in China. In this study, the social behavior and psychological abnormalities which was defined as the positive of any dimension were investigated in multiple dimensions during long-term home-schooling. The influencing factors of psycho-behavioral problems were analyzed by Logistic regression, and the confounding factors were corrected with graded multivariable adjustment. Results: A total of 6 906 valid questionnaires were collected including 3 592 boys and 3 314 girls, of whom 3 626 were children (6-11 years old) and 3 280 were adolescents (12-16 years old). The positive detection rate of psychosocial-behavioral problems were 13.0% (900/6 906) totally, 9.6% (344/3 592) in boys and 16.8% (556/3 314) in girls respectively, and 7.3%(142/1 946) in boys aged 6-11, 14.0%(235/1 680) in girls aged 6-11, 12.3%(202/1 646) in boys aged 12-16, 19.6%(321/1 634) in girls aged 12-16 respectively. There were significant differences between the psychological problems group and the non-psychological problems group in gender, parent-offspring conflict, number of close friends, family income change, sedentary time, homework time, screen exposure time, physical activity, dietary problems (χ²=78.851, 285.264, 52.839, 26.284, 22.778, 11.024, 10.688, 36.814, 70.982, all P<0.01). The most common symptoms in boys aged 6-11 years were compulsive activity, schizoid and depression, in girls aged 6-11 years were schizoid/compulsive activity, hyperactivity and social withdrawal, in boys aged 12-16 years were hyperactivity, compulsive activity and aggressive behavior, and in girls aged 12-16 years were schizoid, anxiety/compulsive activity and depression/withdrawal, respectively. After graded multivariable adjustment, besides the common risk factors, homework time and online study time were the risk factors of 6-11 years old groups [boys OR(95%CI): 1.750 (1.32-2.32), 1.214(1.00-1.47), girls: 1.579(1.25-1.99), 1.222(1.05-1.42), all P<0.05], videogames time were the risk factors of 12-16 years old groups [ boys: 2.237 (1.60-3.13), girls: 1.272 (1.00-1.61), all P<0.05]. Conclusions: Some children and adolescents may have psychological and behavioral problems during long-term home-schooling. The psychological and behavioral manifestations differed in age and gender subgroups, which deserve special attention in each subgroups. Schools, families and specialists should actively provide precise psychological support and comprehensive intervention strategies according to special features and risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Child , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Front Public Health ; 9: 758347, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463526

ABSTRACT

Aim: The study aim was to assess the association of vitamin D supplementation before hospital admission and severe outcomes in subjects admitted for COVID-19. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of pseudonymised medical record data from subjects admitted to the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (Barcelona, Spain) for COVID-19 during March and April 2020. The composite primary study outcome was defined as death and/or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Association between risk factors and study outcomes was evaluated by bivariate analysis, followed by logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 1,267 persons were hospitalised during the observation period. Overall, 14.9% of the subjects were on active vitamin D supplementation treatment before admission. The subjects in the vitamin D group were significantly older than subjects without vitamin D supplementation. We observed higher rates of the primary outcome (death and/or IMV) among the persons with previous use of vitamin D (30.1 vs. 22.9% in those not receiving treatment). In the bivariate analysis, previous use of vitamin D was positively associated with death and/or IMV [odds ratio (OR): 1.45 95% CI: 1.03; 2.04]; however, after adjustment for other risk factors this association disappeared (OR: 1.09 95%CI: 0.65; 1.81). Conclusion: We did not find an association between vitamin D supplementation before hospital admission and death and/or IMV in subjects admitted for COVID-19. The age and the burden of age-associated comorbidities were independently associated with the in-hospital events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 719665, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463524

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is a global pandemic and vaccination efforts may be impeded by vaccine hesitancy. The present study examined willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, the associated reasons for willingness/unwillingness, and vaccine safety perceptions in a cross-sectional assessment of community adults in Ontario. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty seven individuals (60.6% female, mean age = 37.5%) participated in this study between January 15, 2021 and February 15, 2021. Perceptions of vaccine safety and reasons for willingness/unwillingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine were investigated using an online assessment. Perceptions were investigated in general and by age, sex and education using analysis of variance. Results: Overall, 82.8% of the sample reported they were willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and 17.2% reported they were unwilling. The three most common reasons for unwillingness were long-term side effects (65.5%), immediate side effects (60.5%), and lack of trust in the vaccine (55.2%). Vaccine willingness significantly differed by sex and education level, with female participants and those with less than a bachelor's degree being more likely to report unwillingness. Perception of COVID-19 vaccine safety was significantly lower (-10.3%) than vaccines in general and differed by age, sex and education, with females, older adults, and individuals with less than a bachelor's degree reporting lower perceived COVID-19 vaccine safety. Conclusion: In this sample of community adults, the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy rate was less than one in five individuals, but with higher rates in population subgroups. Targeting public health messaging to females and individuals with less than bachelor's degree, and addressing concerns about long-term and immediate side effects may increase vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Ontario , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 700769, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463522

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the utility and patterns of COVID-19 simulation scenarios across different international healthcare centers. Methods: This is a cross-sectional, international survey for multiple simulation centers team members, including team-leaders and healthcare workers (HCWs), based on each center's debriefing reports from 30 countries in all WHO regions. The main outcome measures were the COVID-19 simulations characteristics, facilitators, obstacles, and challenges encountered during the simulation sessions. Results: Invitation was sent to 343 simulation team leaders and multidisciplinary HCWs who responded; 121 completed the survey. The frequency of simulation sessions was monthly (27.1%), weekly (24.8%), twice weekly (19.8%), or daily (21.5%). Regarding the themes of the simulation sessions, they were COVID-19 patient arrival to ER (69.4%), COVID-19 patient intubation due to respiratory failure (66.1%), COVID-19 patient requiring CPR (53.7%), COVID-19 transport inside the hospital (53.7%), COVID-19 elective intubation in OR (37.2%), or Delivery of COVID-19 mother and neonatal care (19%). Among participants, 55.6% reported the team's full engagement in the simulation sessions. The average session length was 30-60 min. The debriefing process was conducted by the ICU facilitator in (51%) of the sessions followed by simulation staff in 41% of the sessions. A total of 80% reported significant improvement in clinical preparedness after simulation sessions, and 70% were satisfied with the COVID-19 sessions. Most perceived issues reported were related to infection control measures, followed by team dynamics, logistics, and patient transport issues. Conclusion: Simulation centers team leaders and HCWs reported positive feedback on COVID-19 simulation sessions with multidisciplinary personnel involvement. These drills are a valuable tool for rehearsing safe dynamics on the frontline of COVID-19. More research on COVID-19 simulation outcomes is warranted; to explore variable factors for each country and healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Work ; 70(1): 31-39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has raised challenges in adapting to teaching and learning methods in dental education. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the academic activities of undergraduate (UDG) and graduate (GD) dental students in Brazil. Additionally, students' perceptions and attitudes toward teaching activities during this period were analyzed. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted with a sample of Brazilian UDG and GD dentistry students. Data were collected in 2020 through an online, self-administered, and anonymous questionnaire, which comprised 26 questions related to demographic data, activities of the college, family and individual student income, and attitudes and perceptions about e-learning during the pandemic. The data were tabulated and analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The sample included 1,166 students (779 UDG and 387 GD). Among these, 425 (54.6%) UDG and 270 (69.8%) GD students remotely participated in teaching activities, of which 42.6% of the UDG considered their performance in e-learning to be bad or very bad and 49.8% of the GD regarded it as good or excellent. The survey also showed that 354 (45.4%) UDG and 102 (26.4%) GD expressed a desire to discontinue the course following the outbreak of the pandemic. Among the GD, 225 (58.4%) said that their experiments were completely interrupted. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the poor perception and performance of dental students regarding e-learning. Additionally, the findings suggest a negative impact of the pandemic on dental education in Brazil. Effective measures should be taken to mitigate these significant consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
14.
Work ; 70(1): 11-20, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to an unavailability of a vaccine, one of the efficient methods to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is by applying self-isolation (SI). Hence there is an urgent need to investigate the factors leading to an individuals' willingness to choose to self-isolate. OBJECTIVES: The current study utilized the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a conceptual model and aimed to investigate the extent to which subjective norms, personal attitudes and perceived control influences an individual's willingness to self-isolate during COVID-19 risk. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed on 800 Saudi respondents aged≥18 years by using a validated self-administered questionnaire about factors related to willingness to self-isolate during COVID-19 pandemic risk based on the TPB. The effects of different variables on SI were analyzed by using ordinal logistic regression model. RESULTS: A total of 756 (94.5%) were completed and analyzed. Subjective norms and perceived control over the behavior significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the intention of willingness to self-isolate, while attitude was found to be insignificant. The odds of letting others to know about self COVID status were 2.40 times higher than not telling the neighbors or colleagues. A statistically significant difference (p≤0.001) existed between males and females regarding the willingness to self-isolate. Similarly the odds of willingness to self-isolate with a presence of disabled person in family were 2.88 times higher than the absence of a disability in the family. Few recommendations for the policymakers that are needed to curb the spread of COVID-19 infection are also proposed. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of study might be considered as an initial understanding of the factors that significantly influences an individual's willingness to SI when facing an unprecedented pandemic risk. Additionally, these factors provide a plan for policymakers to encourage citizens for self-isolation during pandemic infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Work ; 70(1): 3-10, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463450

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sudden shift into distance learning during the coronavirus (COVID-19) lockdown might have impacted university students' well-being. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate undergraduate healthcare university students' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its predictors during COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study used an online self-administered questionnaire. The study targeted undergraduate medical, dental, pharmacy, and nursing students at Jordanian universities. Data collected included demographics,12-item Short Form health survey (SF-12), students' evaluation of distance learning, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS21), and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Descriptive analyses were conducted to summarize primary outcome measures data. Predictors of HRQoL were determined using a multiple variable regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 485 university students successfully completed this study with a mean age of 20.6 (±2.0). Participants' HRQoL level measured by SF-12 mean scores were 66.5 (±20.2) for physical health component and 44.8 (±21.2) for mental health component. The regression model explained 65.5% of the variation (r2 = 0.655, F = 127.8, P < 0.001) in participants' HRQoL. Factors significantly associated with HRQoL included depression, neck disability index score, stress, health self-evaluation, average of satisfaction with distance learning, IPAQ score, and weekly studying hours. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that healthcare students had a relatively low level of HRQoL during COVID-19 pandemic in Jordan. Academic and non-academic factors associated with HRQoL were identified and should be considered by healthcare educational institutions for better academic planning in future similar pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Nursing , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 203, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463259

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent national lockdowns, school closures and distance learning may have had both negative and positive effects on physical and mental health of children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a large group of children between 1 and 10 years old in Lombardy, Italy (n = 3392). Their parents filled in a survey answering single or multiple-choice questions about their offspring's behavior changes (including sleep, dietary habits, emotional disturbances), relationship with siblings, parents and peers, the use of digital technologies, and distance learning experience during the lockdown. RESULTS: Parents reported lifestyles and emotional alterations during the lockdown. The modifications of family relationships, parents' remote working, and screen time were associated with sleep, emotional and behavioral modifications. Distance learning was overall considered adequate. CONCLUSIONS: This study reported the most updated data on the effects of COVID-19 pandemic lockdown on children between 1 and 10 years of age in a large sample of Italian schoolchildren. The results of this study point out that pediatricians and authorities should support relationships within families during the COVID-19 pandemic. Parents' remote working might play an important role for this purpose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Educational Technology , Life Style , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1080, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health workers, in short supply in many low-and-middle-income countries, are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. This study aimed to assess how South Africa, prepared to protect its health workers from SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study design applying participatory action research in four provinces of South Africa. A semi-structured questionnaire and a qualitative observational HealthWISE walkthrough risk assessment was carried out to collect data on occupational safety and health (OSH) systems in 45 hospitals across four provinces to identify factors associated with health worker protection. Adapting the International Labour Organization (ILO) and World Health Organization (WHO) HealthWISE tool, we compiled compliance scores through walkthrough surveys. We used logistic regression to analyze the relationship between readiness indicators and the actual implementation of protective measures. RESULTS: We found that health facilities in all four provinces had SARS-CoV-2 plans for the general population but no comprehensive OHS plan for health workers. Provincial Departments of Health (PDoH) varied in how they were organized to respond: Provinces A and D had an OSH SARS-CoV-2 provincial coordinating team and a dedicated budget for occupational health; Province A had an occupational health doctor and nurse; while Province B had an occupational health nurse; Province A and D PDoHs had functional OSH committees; and Province D had conducted some health risk assessments specific to SARS-CoV-2. However, none of the assessed health facilities had an acceptable HealthWISE compliance score (≥ 75%) due to poor ventilation and inadequate administrative control measures. While the supply of personal protective equipment was adequate, it was often not worn properly. Our study found that having an OSH SARS-CoV-2 policy was significantly associated with higher personal protective equipment and ventilation scores. In addition, our analysis showed that hospitals with higher compliance scores had significantly lower infection rates (IRR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Despite some initial preparedness, greater effort to protect health workers is still warranted. Low-and-middle-income countries may need to pay more attention to OSH systems and consider using tools, such as ILO/WHO HealthWISE tool, to protect health workers' health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology
18.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1079, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463249

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The safety of health care workers (HCWs) in Bangladesh and the factors associated with getting COVID-19 have been infrequently studied. The aim of this study was to address this gap by assessing the capacity development and safety measures of HCWs in Bangladesh who have been exposed to COVID-19 and by identifying the factors associated with respondents' self-reported participation in capacity development trainings and their safety practices. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was based on an online survey of 811 HCWs working at 39 dedicated COVID-19 hospitals in Bangladesh. A pretested structured questionnaire consisting of questions related to respondents' characteristics, capacity development trainings and safety measures was administered. Binary logistic regressions were run to assess the association between explanatory and dependent variables. RESULTS: Among the respondents, 58.1% had been engaged for at least 2 months in COVID-19 care, with 56.5% of them attending capacity development training on the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), 44.1% attending training on hand hygiene, and 35% attending training on respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette. Only 18.1% reported having read COVID-19-related guidelines. Approximately 50% of the respondents claimed that there was an inadequate supply of PPE for hospitals and HCWs. Almost 60% of the respondents feared a high possibility of becoming COVID-19-positive. Compared to physicians, support staff [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.25-8.51] and medical technologists (OR 8.77, 95% CI 3.14-24.47) were more exhausted from working in COVID-19 care. Respondents with longer duty rosters were more exhausted, and those who were still receiving infection prevention and control (IPC) trainings were less exhausted (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.86). Those who read COVID-19 guidelines perceived a lower risk of being infected by COVID-19 (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.29-0.67). Compared to the respondents who strongly agreed that hospitals had a sufficient supply of PPE, others who disagreed (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.31-5.51) and strongly disagreed (OR 5.05, 95% CI 2.15-11.89) had a higher apprehension of infection by COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The findings indicated a need for necessary support, including continuous training, a reasonable duty roster, timely diagnosis of patients, and an adequate supply of quality PPE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 802, 2021 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Proactive integrated virtual healthcare resource (VHR) use can improve efficiency, maximize resource capacity for delivering optimal coordinated care and improve patient outcomes. Proactive integrated VHR use is vital for delivering high quality care. Our objectives were to identify proactive integrated VHR use among primary care teams, best practices and targeted implementation strategies to promote proactive integrated VHR use. METHODS: This is a mixed-method descriptive study. We employed a community-based participatory approach to collect data and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to analyze and contextualize findings. A cross-sectional sample of primary care team members (n = 65) from a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center participated in focus groups, follow-up interviews (n = 16), and respond to self-report surveys. Operational subject matter experts (n = 15) participated in informant interviews. RESULTS: Survey data described current use and factors that influenced singular VHR use and were convergent with qualitative findings. Focus group and interview data described no evidence of proactive integrated VHR use. Differences and similarities were identified between both utilization groups, such as facilitators and barriers, recommendations, patient education and preferred implementation strategies. All groups reported issues around VHR availability knowledge and access and functionality. Participants identified the need for best practices that are specific to care tasks and performance measures. Expert informant interviews identified a list of VHR tools that could be proactively integrated across the healthcare continuum. CONCLUSIONS: Health systems are leveraging technologies to proactively integrate VHR to maximize information exchange, clinical decision support and patient engagement. VHR is critical during global pandemics, such as COVID-19, to maintain access to care coordination and delivery while abiding by public health recommendations. Though recent requirements for reducing contact create an intrinsic motivation, cultural change through education and best practices of proactive integrated use across the healthcare continuum is needed to create a culture of VHR super users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Primary Health Care , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
20.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1830, 2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a common but urgent mental health problem during disease outbreaks. Resilience buffers against the negative impacts of life stressors on common internalizing psychopathology such as GAD. This study assesses the prevalence of GAD and examines the protective or compensatory effect of resilience against worry factors during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among Chinese citizens aged ≥18 years from January 31 to February 2, 2020. A total of 4827 participants across 31 provinces and autonomous regions of the mainland of China participated in this study. The Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and a self-designed worry questionnaire were used to asses anxiety disorder prevalence, resilience level, and anxiety risk factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the associations of resilience and worry factors with GAD prevalence after controlling for other covariates. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety disorder was 22.6% across the 31 areas, and the highest prevalence was 35.4% in Hubei province. After controlling for covariates, the results suggested a higher GAD prevalence among participants who were worried about themselves or family members being infected with COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio, AOR 3.40, 95%CI 2.43-4.75), worried about difficulty obtaining masks (AOR 1.92, 95%CI 1.47-2.50), worried about difficulty of distinguishing true information (AOR 1.65, 95%CI 1.36-2.02), worried about the prognosis of COVID-19 (AOR 2.41, 95%CI 1.75-3.33), worried about delays in working (AOR 1.71, 95%CI 1.27-.31), or worried about decreased income (AOR 1.45, 95%CI 1.14-1.85) compared with those without such worries. Additionally, those with a higher resilience level had a lower prevalence of GAD (AOR 0.59, 95%CI 0.51-0.70). Resilience also showed a mediating effect, with a negative influence on worry factors and thereby a negative association with GAD prevalence. CONCLUSION: It may be beneficial to promote public mental health during the COVID-19 outbreak through enhancing resilience, which may buffer against adverse psychological effects from worry factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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