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1.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2511: 321-332, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941386

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory diseases caused by infectious agents such as the SARS-CoV-2 virus can lead to impaired reductive-oxidative (REDOX) balance and disrupted mitochondrial function. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) provide a useful model for studying the effects of inflammatory diseases on mitochondrial function but can be limited by the need to store these cells by cryopreservation prior to assay. Here, we describe a method for improving and determining PBMC viability with normalization of values to number of living cells. The approach can be applied not only to PBMC samples derived from patients with diseases marked by an altered inflammatory response such as viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Cryopreservation/methods , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Mitochondria , Respiration , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 753267, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902944

ABSTRACT

An extreme strain has been placed on healthcare facilities in the COVID-19 era. Initial stage of the pandemic, national and international societies for reproductive medicine suggested the suspension of new IVF treatments and non-essential cryopreservation of gametes. Accordingly, the demands of cryopreservation of semen with COVID-19 patients also was suspended by some of cryobanks to protect staff and patients from unnecessary viral exposure at the acute stage. However, the pandemic may stay with us longer than expected. In addition, there will be some male COVID-19 patients with cancer or critically illness who needs to cryopreserve their semen before medical treatments, otherwise they might loss the chance of getting their own offspring. In this document, we summarize available evidence to deepen and expand awareness of feasibility of sperm cryopreservation and propose some suggestions to help cryobanks carry out sperm preservation procedure for COVID-19 male patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Semen Preservation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cryopreservation/methods , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Spermatozoa
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686815

ABSTRACT

Quantitative and functional analysis of mononuclear leukocyte populations is an invaluable tool to understand the role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of a disease. Cryopreservation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) is routinely used to guarantee similar experimental conditions. Immune cells react differently to cryopreservation, and populations and functions of immune cells change during the process of freeze-thawing. To allow for a setup that preserves cell number and function optimally, we tested four different cryopreservation media. MNCs from 15 human individuals were analyzed. Before freezing and after thawing, the distribution of leukocytes was quantified by flow cytometry. Cultured cells were stimulated using lipopolysaccharide, and their immune response was quantified by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ultimately, the performance of the cryopreservation media was ranked. Cell recovery and viability were different between the media. Cryopreservation led to changes in the relative number of monocytes, T cells, B cells, and their subsets. The inflammatory response of MNCs was altered by cryopreservation, enhancing the basal production of inflammatory cytokines. Different cryopreservation media induce biases, which needs to be considered when designing a study relying on cryopreservation. Here, we provide an overview of four different cryopreservation media for choosing the optimal medium for a specific task.


Subject(s)
Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Cryopreservation/methods , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Male
4.
Cytotherapy ; 24(4): 437-443, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a fundamental change in the global procurement of allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for transplantation. To better meet the emergent challenges of transporting cryopreserved allogeneic HPC during pandemics, there is an urgent need for External Quality Assurance (EQA) programs to evaluate reproducibility and harmonization of viable CD34+ cell (vCD34+) HPC enumeration, as the current EQA programs are unsuitable for analysis of vCD34+. The cost-effective distribution of HPC cryopreserved reference samples (CRSs) with acceptable reproducibility and specificity is key to the success of a vCD34+ EQA program. METHODS: Cryopreserved HPC samples (n = 11) were either stored on dry ice for 1 to 4 days or for 1 day followed by liquid nitrogen (LN) storage for 1 to 3 days to assess optimal conditions for vCD34+ EQA. Flow cytometric enumeration of vCD34+ HPCs was performed using a single platform assay combined with 7-AAD viability dye exclusion. The optimum transportation condition was validated in pilot and multicenter national studies (n = 12). RESULTS: A combination of 1 day on dry ice followed by LN storage stabilized viability compared with continuous storage on dry ice. This study demonstrates that dispatch of CRSs on dry ice to recipient centers across a distance of ≤4000 km within 26 h, followed by LN storage, resulted in reproducible intercenter vCD34+ enumeration. The estimated cost of safer and more convenient dry ice delivery is >20-fold lower than that of LN. CONCLUSION: This approach can form the basis for economically and scientifically acceptable distribution of CRSs for external vCD34+ EQA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Antigens, CD34 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cells , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results
5.
Eur J Haematol ; 108(1): 61-72, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476174

ABSTRACT

During 2020, the concurrent novel COVID-19 pandemic lead to widespread cryopreservation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant grafts based on National Marrow Donor Program and European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation recommendations, in order to secure grafts before the start of conditioning chemotherapy. We sought to examine the impact of this change in practice on patient outcomes. We analyzed the outcomes of 483 patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) between August 2017 and August 2020, at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Canada, in the retrospective study, comparing the outcomes between those who received cryopreserved or fresh peripheral blood stem cell grafts. Overall compared with those who received fresh grafts (n = 348), patients who received cryopreserved grafts (n = 135) had reduced survival and GRFS, reduced incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), delay in neutrophil engraftment, and higher graft failure (GF), with no significant difference in relapse incidence or acute GvHD. However, recipients of cryopreserved matched-related donor HSCT showed significantly worse OS, NRM, GRFS compared with fresh grafts. Multivariable analysis of the entire cohort showed significant impact of cryopreservation on OS, relapse, cGvHD, GF, and GRFS. We conclude that cryopreservation was associated with inferior outcomes post-HSCT, possibly due to the combination of ATG and post-transplant cyclophosphamide impacting differential tolerance to cryopreservation on components of the stem cell graft; further studies are warranted to elucidate mechanisms for this observation.


Subject(s)
Antilymphocyte Serum/therapeutic use , Cryopreservation/methods , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/cytology , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Graft vs Host Disease , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Transplantation Conditioning , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
6.
Cryobiology ; 103: 1-6, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439960

ABSTRACT

Cryopreservation and re-transplantation of ovarian tissue after anticancer treatment is important medical technology. Today, during a pandemic, the risk of contamination of transplanted cells with SARS-CoV-2 virus is extremely high. Data about cryo-resistance (virulence and/or infectivity) of SARS-CoV-2 are limited. Analysis and systematization of literature data allow us to draw the following conclusions: 1) The cytoplasmic membrane of somatic cell, like envelope of corona viruses, consists of lipid bilayer and this membrane, like envelope of corona virus, contains membrane proteins. Thus, we can consider the cytoplasmic membrane of an ordinary somatic cell as a model of the envelope membrane of SARS-CoV-2. It is expected that the response of the virus to cryopreservation is similar to that of a somatic cell. SARS-CoV-2 is more poor-water and more protein-rich than somatic cell, and this virus is much more cryo-resistant. 2) The exposure of somatic cells at low positive temperatures increases a viability of these cells. The safety of the virus is also in direct proportion to the decrease in temperature: the positive effect of low temperatures on SARS-CoV-2 virus has been experimentally proven. 3) Resistance of SARS-CoV-2 to cryoprotectant-free cryopreservation is extremely high. The high viability rate of SARS-CoV-2 after freezing-drying confirms its high cryo-resistance. 4) The risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection after transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissues that have been contaminated with this virus, increases significantly. Our own experimental data on the increase in the viability of cancer cells after cryopreservation allow us to formulate a hypothesis about increasing of viability (virulence and/or infectivity) of SARS-CoV-2 virus after cryopreservation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Cryopreservation/methods , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323125

ABSTRACT

The open carrier system (OC) is used for vitrification due to its high efficiency in preserving female fertility, but concerns remain that it bears possible risks of cross-contamination. Closed carrier systems (CC) could be an alternative to the OC to increase safety. However, the viability and developmental competence of vitrified/warmed (VW) oocytes using the CC were significantly lower than with OC. We aimed to improve the efficiency of the CC. Metaphase II oocytes were collected from mice after superovulation and subjected to in vitro fertilization after vitrification/warming. Increasing the cooling/warming rate and exposure time to cryoprotectants as key parameters for the CC effectively improved the survival rate and developmental competence of VW oocytes. When all the conditions that improved the outcomes were applied to the conventional CC, hereafter named the modified vitrification/warming procedure using CC (mVW-CC), the viability and developmental competence of VW oocytes were significantly improved as compared to those of VW oocytes in the CC. Furthermore, mVW-CC increased the spindle normality of VW oocytes, as well as the cell number of blastocysts developed from VW oocytes. Collectively, our mVW-CC optimized for mouse oocytes can be utilized for humans without concerns regarding possible cross-contamination during vitrification in the future.


Subject(s)
Blastocyst/cytology , Cryopreservation/methods , Fertilization in Vitro/methods , Oocytes/cytology , Vitrification , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , Blastocyst/metabolism , CDX2 Transcription Factor/genetics , CDX2 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Cadherins/genetics , Cadherins/metabolism , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cryoprotective Agents/pharmacology , Dimethyl Sulfoxide/pharmacology , Ethylene Glycol/pharmacology , Female , Gene Expression , Male , Metaphase , Mice , Oocytes/drug effects , Oocytes/metabolism , Spermatozoa/physiology , Sucrose/pharmacology
8.
J Immunol ; 207(2): 720-734, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311404

ABSTRACT

Most shared resource flow cytometry facilities do not permit analysis of radioactive samples. We are investigating low-dose molecular targeted radionuclide therapy (MTRT) as an immunomodulator in combination with in situ tumor vaccines and need to analyze radioactive samples from MTRT-treated mice using flow cytometry. Further, the sudden shutdown of core facilities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented work stoppage. In these and other research settings, a robust and reliable means of cryopreservation of immune samples is required. We evaluated different fixation and cryopreservation protocols of disaggregated tumor cells with the aim of identifying a protocol for subsequent flow cytometry of the thawed sample, which most accurately reflects the flow cytometric analysis of the tumor immune microenvironment of a freshly disaggregated and analyzed sample. Cohorts of C57BL/6 mice bearing B78 melanoma tumors were evaluated using dual lymphoid and myeloid immunophenotyping panels involving fixation and cryopreservation at three distinct points during the workflow. Results demonstrate that freezing samples after all staining and fixation are completed most accurately matches the results from noncryopreserved equivalent samples. We observed that cryopreservation of living, unfixed cells introduces a nonuniform alteration to PD1 expression. We confirm the utility of our cryopreservation protocol by comparing tumors treated with in situ tumor vaccines, analyzing both fresh and cryopreserved tumor samples with similar results. Last, we use this cryopreservation protocol with radioactive specimens to demonstrate potentially beneficial effector cell changes to the tumor immune microenvironment following administration of a novel MTRT in a dose- and time-dependent manner.


Subject(s)
Cryopreservation/methods , Flow Cytometry/methods , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Melanoma, Experimental/pathology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Animals , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Immunophenotyping/methods , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , Pandemics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Tumor Microenvironment/immunology
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14149, 2021 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303789

ABSTRACT

Cryopreservation of mouse spermatozoa is widely used for the efficient preservation and safe transport of valuable mouse strains. However, the current cryopreservation method requires special containers (plastic straws), undefined chemicals (e.g., skim milk), liquid nitrogen, and expertise when handling sperm suspensions. Here, we report an easy and quick (EQ) sperm freezing method. The main procedure consists of only one step: dissecting a single cauda epididymis in a microtube containing 20% raffinose solution, which is then stored in a -80 °C freezer. The frozen-thawed spermatozoa retain practical fertilization rates after 1 (51%) or even 3 months (25%) with the C57BL/6 J strain, the most sensitive strain for sperm freezing. More than half of the embryos thus obtained developed into offspring after embryo transfer. Importantly, spermatozoa stored at -80 °C can be transferred into liquid nitrogen for indefinite storage. As far as we know, our EQ method is the easiest and quickest method for mouse sperm freezing and should be applicable in all laboratories without expertise in sperm cryopreservation. This technique can help avoid the loss of irreplaceable strains because of closure of animal rooms in emergency situations such as unexpected microbiological contamination or social emergencies such as the COVID-19 threat.


Subject(s)
Cryopreservation/methods , Semen Preservation/methods , Animals , COVID-19 , Cryopreservation/instrumentation , Embryo Transfer , Emergencies , Female , Fertilization in Vitro/methods , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Semen Preservation/instrumentation
11.
Transplant Cell Ther ; 27(3): 270.e1-270.e6, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108498

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has spread rapidly worldwide, but the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the field of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) remains unknown. To understand this better, an 18-item online survey was disseminated by the Worldwide Network for Blood & Marrow Transplantation with questions exploring SARS-CoV-2 testing algorithms, mobilization, and cryopreservation strategies and COVID-19 infections in allogeneic related and autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) donors. The aim of this survey was to assess the impact of the outbreak on policies relating to HPC mobilization, collection, and processing with respect to changes in daily routine. A total of 91 individual responses from distinct centers in 6 continents were available for analysis. In these centers, the majority (72%) of allogeneic related and autologous donors are routinely tested for SARS-CoV-2 before HPC collection, and 80% of centers implement cryopreservation of allogeneic HPC grafts before commencing conditioning regimens in patients. Five related and 14 autologous donors who tested positive for COVID-19 did not experience any unexpected adverse events or reactions during growth factor administration (eg, hyperinflammatory syndrome). These data are limited by the small number of survey respondents but nonetheless suggest that centers are following the recommendations of appropriate scientific organizations and provide some preliminary data to suggest areas of further study.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Algorithms , Allografts , Bone Marrow Transplantation/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cryopreservation/methods , Donor Selection/standards , Global Health , Health Care Surveys , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization/statistics & numerical data , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Tissue Preservation/methods , Transplantation, Autologous , Unrelated Donors/statistics & numerical data
12.
Cell Tissue Bank ; 22(1): 1-10, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064536

ABSTRACT

The safety of the tissue transplant recipient is a top priority for tissue banks, and the emergence of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has raised significant concerns about the risks of releasing tissue for clinical use. In the present study, we conducted a literature review about the potential infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 in different biological tissues and the influence of various tissue processing and sterilization procedures on viral inactivation. The search revealed that SARS-CoV-2 binds to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme receptor to penetrate human cells. These receptors are present in skin cells, musculoskeletal tissue, amniotic membranes, cardiovascular tissue and ocular tissues, including the cornea. In general, we found that coronaviruses are stable at low temperatures, and inactivated upon exposure to extreme heat and pH. Notably, gamma irradiation, which has already been employed to inactivate SARS and MERS, could be useful for sterilizing skin, amnion and musculoskeletal tissues against SARS-CoV-2. We conclude that due to the limited information about the effects of physical and chemical tissue processing methods on viral neutralization, rigorous donor screening is still essential for tissue transplant recipient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sterilization/methods , Transplants/virology , Virus Inactivation , COVID-19/transmission , Cryopreservation/methods , Hot Temperature , Humans , Radiation, Ionizing , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Tissue Donors , Tissue Preservation/methods , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects
13.
Hum Reprod ; 35(12): 2650-2657, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059825

ABSTRACT

Cryopreservation of reproductive cells and tissues represents an essential aspect of ART practices that might be particularly strategic and helpful during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emergency. However, recommendations on how and when to preserve reproductive tissues and cells during a novel severe pandemic are scanty. This article uses a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis to identify favourable and unfavourable factors and to recognize challenges and obstacles related to the use of cryopreservation procedures during the spreading of a new virus. One of the strengths associated with the cryopreservation is represented by the availability of robust European guidelines on storage safety to prevent sample contamination or cross-contamination by pathogens. These recommendations should be deep-rooted in all ART laboratories. Weaknesses include uncertainties regarding the management of COVID-19 affected asymptomatic patients, the suboptimal accuracy of diagnostic tests for the disease, the nebulous prospective regarding the duration of the pandemic and the additional costs. The application of the strategy represents an opportunity to postpone pregnancy in order to avoid a severe infectious disease during gestation while concomitantly counteracting the possible detrimental effect of time. Critical threats, at present still undefined, are represented by potential adverse events for the mother and offspring due to infected gametes or embryos after thawing and, subsequently, the re-spreading of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Reproductive Medicine/methods , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Europe , Female , Humans , Medical Errors , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pregnancy , Reproductive Medicine/standards , Risk Assessment/methods , Societies, Medical , Zona Pellucida/metabolism
14.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(3): 681-688, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023340

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The main purpose and research question of the study are to compare the efficacy of high-security closed versus open devices for human oocytes' vitrification. METHODS: A prospective randomized study was conducted. A total of 737 patients attending the Infertility and IVF Unit at S.Orsola University Hospital (Italy) between October 2015 and April 2020 were randomly assigned to two groups. A total of 368 patients were assigned to group 1 (High-Security Vitrification™ - HSV) and 369 to group 2 (Cryotop® open system). Oocyte survival, fertilization, cleavage, pregnancy, implantation, and miscarriage rate were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were observed on survival rate (70.3% vs. 73.3%), fertilization rate (70.8% vs. 74.9%), cleavage rate (90.6% vs. 90.3%), pregnancy/transfer ratio (32.0% vs. 31.8%), implantation rate (19.7% vs. 19.9%), nor miscarriage rates (22.1% vs. 21.5%) between the two groups. Women's mean age in group 1 (36.18 ± 3.92) and group 2 (35.88 ± 3.88) was not significantly different (P = .297). A total of 4029 oocytes were vitrified (1980 and 2049 in groups 1 and 2 respectively). A total of 2564 were warmed (1469 and 1095 in groups 1 and 2 respectively). A total of 1386 morphologically eligible oocytes were inseminated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (792 and 594 respectively, P = .304). CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that the replacement of the open vitrification system by a closed one has no impact on in vitro and in vivo survival, development, pregnancy and implantation rate. Furthermore, to ensure safety, especially during the current COVID-19 pandemic, the use of the closed device eliminates the potential samples' contamination during vitrification and storage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Oocytes/physiology , Oocytes/virology , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/standards , Adult , Cryopreservation/methods , Cryopreservation/standards , Embryo Implantation/physiology , Embryo Transfer/methods , Female , Fertilization in Vitro/methods , Fertilization in Vitro/standards , Humans , Italy , Oocyte Donation/methods , Oocyte Donation/standards , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic/methods
15.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(7): e161-e166, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-799190

ABSTRACT

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing barriers to the collection and transport of donor cells, it is often necessary to collect and cryopreserve grafts before initiation of transplantation conditioning. The effect on transplantation outcomes in nonmalignant disease is unknown. This analysis examined the effect of cryopreservation of related and unrelated donor grafts for transplantation for severe aplastic anemia in the United States during 2013 to 2019. Included are 52 recipients of cryopreserved grafts who were matched for age, donor type, and graft type to 194 recipients who received noncryopreserved grafts. Marginal Cox regression models were built to study the effect of cryopreservation and other risk factors associated with outcomes. We recorded higher 1-year rates of graft failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.17 to 4.35; P = .01) and of 1-year overall mortality (HR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.60 to 6.11; P = .0008) after transplantation of cryopreserved compared with noncryopreserved grafts, with adjustment for sex, performance score, comorbidity, cytomegalovirus serostatus, and ABO blood group match. The incidence of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease did not differ between the 2 groups. Adjusted probabilities of 1-year survival were 73% (95% CI, 60% to 84%) in the cryopreserved graft group and 91% (95% CI, 86% to 94%) in the noncryopreserved graft group. These data support the use of noncryopreserved grafts whenever possible in patients with severe aplastic anemia.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Aplastic/therapy , Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Graft Rejection/pathology , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anemia, Aplastic/immunology , Anemia, Aplastic/mortality , Anemia, Aplastic/pathology , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Graft Rejection/immunology , Graft Rejection/mortality , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/mortality , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Siblings , Survival Analysis , Transplantation Conditioning/methods , United States/epidemiology , Unrelated Donors
16.
Transfusion ; 60(9): 1905-1909, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613577

ABSTRACT

New York is at the epicenter of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Columbia University Irving Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (CUIMC/NYPH) had to make changes to its cellular therapy operations to ensure patient, donor, and staff safety and well-being. In this article, we discuss the process changes we instituted for cellular therapy clinical care, collection, processing, and cryopreservation to cope with the rapidly evolving pandemic.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Bone Marrow Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing , Cell Separation/methods , Child , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Cryopreservation/methods , Donor Selection , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocyte Transfusion/methods , Lymphocyte Transfusion/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Organ Preservation/methods , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Preservation, Biological/methods , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Tissue Donors , Tissue and Organ Procurement/methods , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration
17.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(7): 1312-1317, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-208523

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant barriers to timely donor evaluation, cell collection, and graft transport for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To ensure availability of donor cells on the scheduled date of infusion, many sites now collect cryopreserved grafts before the start of pretransplantation conditioning. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (ptCY) is an increasingly used approach for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, but the impact of graft cryopreservation on the outcomes of allo-HCT using ptCY is not known. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database, we compared the outcomes of HCT using cryopreserved versus fresh grafts in patients undergoing HCT for hematologic malignancy with ptCY. We analyzed 274 patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing allo-HCT between 2013 and 2018 with cryopreserved grafts and ptCY. Eighteen patients received bone marrow grafts and 256 received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. These patients were matched for age, graft type, disease risk index (DRI), and propensity score with 1080 patients who underwent allo-HCT with fresh grafts. The propensity score, which is an assessment of the likelihood of receiving a fresh graft versus a cryopreserved graft, was calculated using logistic regression to account for the following: disease histology, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), HCT Comorbidity Index, conditioning regimen intensity, donor type, and recipient race. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression and disease-free survival (DFS). Because of multiple comparisons, only P values <.01 were considered statistically significant. The 2 cohorts (cryopreserved and fresh) were similar in terms of patient age, KPS, diagnosis, DRI, HCT-CI, donor/graft source, and conditioning intensity. One-year probabilities of OS were 71.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.3% to 73.8%) with fresh grafts and 70.3% (95% CI, 64.6% to 75.7%) with cryopreserved grafts (P = .81). Corresponding probabilities of OS at 2 years were 60.6% (95% CI, 57.3% to 63.8%) and 58.7% (95% CI, 51.9% to 65.4%) (P = .62). In matched-pair regression analysis, graft cryopreservation was not associated with a significantly higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] for cryopreserved versus fresh, 1.05; 95% CI, .86 to 1.29; P = .60). Similarly, rates of neutrophil recovery (HR, .91; 95% CI, .80 to 1.02; P = .12), platelet recovery (HR, .88; 95% CI, .78 to 1.00; P = .05), grade III-IV acute GVHD (HR, .78; 95% CI, .50 to 1.22; P = .27), NRM (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .86 to 1.55; P = .32) and relapse/progression (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, .97 to 1.50; P = .09) were similar with cryopreserved grafts versus fresh grafts. There were somewhat lower rates of chronic GVHD (HR, 78; 95% CI, .61 to .99; P = .04) and DFS (HR for treatment failure, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29; P = .04) with graft cryopreservation that were of marginal statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, our data indicate that graft cryopreservation does not significantly delay hematopoietic recovery, increase the risk of acute GVHD or NRM, or decrease OS after allo-HCT using ptCY.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Graft vs Host Disease/prevention & control , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Leukemia/therapy , Lymphoma/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/mortality , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Leukemia/immunology , Leukemia/mortality , Leukemia/pathology , Lymphoma/immunology , Lymphoma/mortality , Lymphoma/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/immunology , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/mortality , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/pathology , Pandemics , Siblings , Survival Analysis , Transplantation Conditioning/methods , Transplantation, Homologous , United States/epidemiology , Unrelated Donors/supply & distribution
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