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3.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs ; 28(6): 941-942, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528402
5.
Am J Public Health ; 111(S3): S224-S231, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496726

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the many broken fragments of US health care and social service systems, reinforcing extant health and socioeconomic inequities faced by structurally marginalized immigrant communities. Throughout the pandemic, even during the most critical period of rising cases in different epicenters, immigrants continued to work in high-risk-exposure environments while simultaneously having less access to health care and economic relief and facing discrimination. We describe systemic factors that have adversely affected low-income immigrants, including limiting their work opportunities to essential jobs, living in substandard housing conditions that do not allow for social distancing or space to safely isolate from others in the household, and policies that discourage access to public resources that are available to them or that make resources completely inaccessible. We demonstrate that the current public health infrastructure has not improved health care access or linkages to necessary services, treatments, or culturally competent health care providers, and we provide suggestions for how the Public Health 3.0 framework could advance this. We recommend the following strategies to improve the Public Health 3.0 public health infrastructure and mitigate widening disparities: (1) address the social determinants of health, (2) broaden engagement with stakeholders across multiple sectors, and (3) develop appropriate tools and technologies. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(S3):S224-S231. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306433).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Public Health , Culturally Competent Care/ethnology , Employment , Humans , Racism
8.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200209, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443889

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To reflect on cross-cultural care for the population based on the theoretical assumptions and concepts of Leininger's Transcultural Theory, related to the recommendations for combating the Covid-19 pandemic. METHOD: Reflective theoretical study based on culturally competent care, related to the Brazilian reality, using the conceptual attributes of care, culture, and worldview. Critically articulated the reasonings about the guidelines for preserving, accommodating, and repatterning actions for the care of people. RESULTS: The nurse must know cross-cultural care in order to consider individual and/or collective treatment and respect the existing differences in beliefs and values. This premise corroborates the adherence to Covid-19 prevention and treatment recommendations. The lack of knowledge about the transmissibility and invisibility of the virus and the risk factors, combined with the cultural diversity of the population, can make it difficult to adhere to health recommendations. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: Cross-cultural care favors the practice of health education and can provide conditions for greater adherence of the population to nursing actions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Culturally Competent Care , Nursing Care , Transcultural Nursing , Humans , Nursing Theory , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Sci Diabetes Self Manag Care ; 47(4): 290-301, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329105

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this substudy was to determine the most acceptable way to restart the Texas Strength Through Resilience in Diabetes Education (TX STRIDE) study safely using remote technologies. Following the emergence of COVID-19, all in-person TX STRIDE intervention and data collection sessions were paused. METHODS: Qualitative descriptive methods using telephone interviews were conducted during the research pause. A structured interview guide was developed to facilitate data collection and coding. Forty-seven of 59 Cohort 1 participants were interviewed (mean age = 60.7 years; 79% female; mean time diagnosed with type 2 diabetes = 11 years). RESULTS: Data categories and subcategories were generated from the interview responses and included: personal experiences with COVID-19, effects of COVID-19 on diabetes self-management, psychosocial and financial effects of COVID-19, and recommendations for program restart. Although some participants lacked technological knowledge, they expressed eagerness to learn how to use remote meeting platforms to resume intervention and at-home data-collection sessions. Six months after the in-person intervention was paused, TX STRIDE restarted remotely with data collection and class sessions held via Zoom. A majority of participants (72.9%) transitioned to the virtual platform restart. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative findings guided the appropriate implementation of technology for the study, which facilitated a successful restart. High retention of participants through the study transition provides evidence that participants are invested in learning how to manage their diabetes despite the challenges and distractions imposed by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
African Americans , COVID-19 , Culturally Competent Care , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , African Americans/psychology , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/ethnology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/ethnology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Self-Management/education , Self-Management/psychology , Texas/epidemiology
16.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs ; 28(6): 941-942, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243630
17.
Health Secur ; 19(S1): S41-S49, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219235

ABSTRACT

Vulnerable refugee communities are disproportionately affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic; existing longstanding health inequity in these communities is exacerbated by ineffective risk communication practices about COVID-19. Culturally and linguistically appropriate health communication following health literacy guidelines is needed to dispel cultural myths, social stigma, misinformation, and disinformation. For refugee communities, the physical, mental, and social-related consequences of displacement further complicate understanding of risk communication practices grounded in a Western cultural ethos. We present a case study of Clarkston, Georgia, the "most diverse square mile in America," where half the population is foreign born and majority refugee. Supporting marginalized communities in times of risk will require a multipronged, systemic approach to health communication including: (1) creating a task force of local leaders and community members to deal with emergent issues; (2) expanding English-language education and support for refugees; (3) including refugee perspectives on risk, health, and wellness into risk communication messaging; (4) improving cultural competence and health literacy training for community leaders and healthcare providers; and (5) supporting community health workers. Finally, better prepared public health programs, including partnerships with trusted community organizations and leadership, can ensure that appropriate and supportive risk communication and health education and promotion are in place long before the next emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Community Health Workers/organization & administration , Culturally Competent Care/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Health Status Indicators , Refugees/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Georgia , Humans , Needs Assessment/organization & administration
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