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1.
Ann Glob Health ; 89(1): 32, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238945

ABSTRACT

Background: Place-based international electives that build global health competencies have existed for decades. However, these electives require travel and are infeasible for many trainees around the world, particularly those with insufficient financial resources, logistical complexities, or visa limitations. The emergence of virtual approaches to global health electives, catalyzed by the travel pause related to the COVID-19 pandemic, necessitates the exploration of learner impacts, participant diversity, and curricular frameworks. Child Family Health International (CFHI), a non-profit global health education organization that partners with universities to expand immersive educational offerings, launched a virtual global health elective in 2021. The elective drew on faculty from Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Mexico, the Philippines, Uganda, and the United States. Objective: This study aimed to describe a newly developed virtual global health elective curriculum and evaluate the demographics of and impacts on trainee participants. Methods: Eighty-two trainees who were enrolled in the virtual global health elective from January to May 2021 completed both 1) pre- and post-elective self-assessments of domains of competency mapped to the elective curriculum and 2) free text responses to standardized questions. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistical analysis, paired t-testing, and qualitative thematic analysis. Findings: The virtual global health elective had 40% of its participants hail from countries other than the United States. Self-reported competency in global health broadly, planetary health, low resource clinical reasoning, and overall composite competency significantly increased. Qualitative analysis revealed learner development in health systems, social determinants of health, critical thinking, planetary health, cultural humility, and professional practice. Conclusion: Virtual global health electives effectively develop key competencies in global health. This virtual elective had a 40-fold increase in the proportion of trainees from outside the United States, compared to pre-pandemic place-based electives. The virtual platform facilitates accessibility for learners from a variety of health professions and a wide range of geographic and socioeconomic environments. Further research is needed to confirm and expand on self-reported data, and to pursue approaches to greater diversity, equity, and inclusion in virtual frameworks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , United States , Humans , Global Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Collection , Curriculum , Catalysis
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 388, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The establishment of new anatomy facilities needs to accommodate a combination of modern teaching modalities that best align with evidence-based best teaching practices. This article describes the process in which our state-of-the-art anatomy laboratories were designed and implemented, and how these facilities support aspects of modern anatomy education. METHODS: A list of best practices for anatomy education in a modern medical curriculum was summarized from the literature. To assess student satisfaction, a survey related to student perception of the anatomy facilities (5-point Likert scale) was conducted. RESULTS: Our educational modalities include a broad range of teaching approaches. The Instructional Studio houses prosected and plastinated specimens, and cadaveric dissections are performed. Each of our three Dry Laboratories allow for active learning and interaction between small student groups. The Webinar Room acts as a conference room for departmental and online meetings, discussions with students, and dialogues with affiliated hospitals via the internet. The Imaging Center is equipped with a Sectra® medical educational platform, CAE Vimedix® Virtual Medical Imaging Ultrasound Training System, and Philipps Lumify® Ultrasound devices to train students to conduct and interpret sonographic images. Moreover, the Complete Anatomy® program is made available to all our students. CONCLUSION: The layout of our newly created Anatomy Facilities allows for all aspects of modern medical education mentioned in the literature. These educational modalities and teaching approaches are highly appreciated by our faculty and students. Moreover, these technologies allowed for a smooth transition from on-site anatomy teaching to online education during the COVID pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dissection/education , Curriculum , Educational Measurement/methods , Cadaver , Anatomy/education , Teaching
3.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 34(2): 135-141, 2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237739

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The expansion of health professions educational programs has led to an acute shortage of available clinical training sites. Rapid growth in the number of medical schools, physician assistant (PA) programs, and advanced nurse practitioner (APRN) programs, all of which share a need for similar types of clinical training experiences, has increased competition for clinical training sites and placed new challenges on educational institutions. Solutions are urgently needed to increase the quantity and quality of supervised clinical practice experiences as well as to ensure diversity among preceptors and geographical clinical sites. This article identifies key barriers to securing sufficient clinical training sites, notes emerging trends, and presents potential innovations through stakeholder collaboration for enhancing clinical training across health professions.


Subject(s)
Physician Assistants , Preceptorship , Humans , Physician Assistants/education , Educational Status , Curriculum , Schools
4.
Am Psychol ; 78(2): 259-267, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236865

ABSTRACT

There is overwhelming evidence of serious problems with access to health care services, quality of care, and unequal health outcomes among minoritized groups including Black, Indigenous, and other populations of people of color across numerous health outcomes. At the core of health inequities are structural factors that include systemic racism as well as a range of other characteristics associated with limited political, social, and economic power. The APA Presidential Task Force on Psychology and Health Equity was appointed to recommend a course of action for APA in contributing to the solution of health inequities. The Task Force developed the Resolution on Advancing Health Equity in Psychology (https://www.apa.org/about/policy/advancing-health-equity-psychology), adopted as APA policy in October 2021. The current report provides additional discussion of the limitations of current structures of psychology training, science, and professional practice in addressing health inequities. Recommendations are offered for specific actions in the following areas: (a) Education and Training, including recruitment, admissions, and retention along the pathway and curricula transformation throughout the training sequence; (b) Research and Publications, including advocacy for health equity in research funding, mitigating bias in reporting, and improving representation and inclusive excellence; and (c) Professional Practice, including developing competent professional practice models and guidelines and promoting viable service reimbursement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Health Equity , Humans , Societies, Scientific , Curriculum , Psychology
5.
Korean J Med Educ ; 35(2): 187-198, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236740

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The development of students' clinical reasoning skills should be a consideration in the design of instruction and evaluation in medical education. In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, several changes in the medical curriculum have been implemented in promoting clinical reasoning. This study aims to explore medical students' perceptions and experiences with the clinical reasoning curriculum during the COVID-19 pandemic and determine their skills development. METHODS: The study used a mixed-method design with a concurrent approach. A cross-sectional study was conducted to compare and examine the relationship between the outcomes of the structured oral examination (SOE) and the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI). Then, the qualitative method was used. A focus group discussion using a semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions was conducted, then the verbatim transcript was subjected to thematic analysis. RESULTS: There is an increase in SOE and DTI scores between second-year to fourth-year students. The diagnostic thinking domains and SOE are significantly correlated (r=0.302, 0.313, and 0.241 with p<0.05). The three primary themes from the qualitative analysis are perceptions regarding clinical reasoning, clinical reasoning activities, and the learning component. CONCLUSION: Even if students are still studying throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, their clinical reasoning skills can improve. The clinical reasoning and diagnostic thinking skills of medical students increase as the length of the school year increases. Online case-based learning and assessment support the development of clinical reasoning skills. The skills are supported in their development by positive attitudes toward faculty, peers, case type, and prior knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Clinical Competence , Clinical Reasoning
6.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 54(6): 275-280, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235848

ABSTRACT

Failure to rescue is prevalent among patients with traumatic injury who are admitted to medical-surgical units. These units are traditionally staffed by new graduate nurses who require mentorship and ongoing continuing education. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic prompted nurse educators to develop and implement new methods of providing routine and just-in-time education in the hospital setting. This article describes a trauma-focused educational program with live sessions and online educational activities created with survey software. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2023;54(6):275-280.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Curriculum , Educational Status
7.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 54(6): 268-274, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235481

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Graduate nurses are known to experience transition shock when they enter the workforce. Graduate nurse programs are designed to alleviate aspects of transition shock. METHOD: Best practice in development and delivery of transition programs is currently limited in the literature, and there are few examples focusing on curriculum design that can be adapted by health services to develop and support new nurses. RESULTS: An inquiry-based learning approach was used as the underlying andragogy to frame a contemporary transition curriculum to support graduate nurses. CONCLUSION: Inquiry-based learning can be used to support graduate nurses to improve critical thinking, confidence, and job satisfaction during the most challenging years of their professional lives. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2023;54(6):268-274.].


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Nurses , Humans , Workforce , Workplace
8.
J Gerontol Nurs ; 49(6): 6-12, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235072

ABSTRACT

Nursing skill in caring for persons with serious chronic illness is increasingly in demand as the proportion of older adults in the United States increases. There is robust evidence that palliative care education among health care providers influences the reduction of death anxiety and avoidance behavior, while positively impacting self-efficacy and comfort, when caring for persons with serious illness or those nearing death. The international recognition of access to palliative care as a universal human right drives the need for education to adequately prepare nurses who have not been properly prepared for this work. The development of national competencies in palliative care education for nurses is an important step in synthesizing and disseminating available evidence in support of palliative care nursing education. These recently published competencies can lead to policy innovations at local, state, and national levels. Identifying competencies that lead to more clearly defined curricula will ultimately improve standardizing education and improve nursing practice in caring for older adults with serious chronic illness and their families. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 49(6), 6-12.].


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing , Palliative Care , Humans , United States , Aged , Curriculum
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 332, 2023 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social determinants of health (SDH) are intricately intertwined with various social and economic factors. Reflection is essential for learning about SDH. However, only a few reports have focused on reflection in SDH programs; most were cross-sectional studies. We aimed to longitudinally evaluate a SDH program in a community-based medical education (CBME) curriculum that we introduced in 2018 based on the level of reflection and content on SDH in students' reports. METHODS: Study design: General inductive approach for qualitative data analysis. Education program: A 4-week mandatory clinical clerkship in general medicine and primary care at the University of Tsukuba School of Medicine in Japan was provided to all fifth- and sixth-year medical students. Students underwent a 3-week rotation in community clinics and hospitals in suburban and rural areas of Ibaraki Prefecture. After a lecture on SDH on the first day, students were instructed to prepare a structural case description based on encounters during the curriculum. On the final day, students shared their experiences in a small group session and submitted a report on SDH. The program was continuously improved and faculty development was provided. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: Students who completed the program during October 2018-June 2021. ANALYSIS: Levels of reflection were categorized as reflective, analytical, or descriptive. The content was analyzed based on the Solid Facts framework. RESULTS: We analyzed 118 reports from 2018-19, 101 reports from 2019-20, and 142 reports from 2020-21. There were 2 (1.7%), 6 (5.9%), and 7 (4.8%) reflective reports; 9 (7.6%), 24 (23.8%), and 52 (35.9%) analytical reports; and 36 (30.5%), 48 (47.5%), and 79 (54.5%) descriptive reports, respectively. The others were not evaluable. The number of Solid Facts framework items in reports were 2.0 ± 1.2, 2.6 ± 1.3, and 3.3 ± 1.4, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Students' understanding of SDH deepened as the SDH program in the CBME curriculum improved. Faculty development might have contributed to the results. Reflective understanding of SDH might require more faculty development and integrated education of social science and medicine.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , Social Determinants of Health , Health Education , Curriculum , Data Analysis
10.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 52, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327823

ABSTRACT

Medical education has drastically transformed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Measures such as adopting telemedicine visits, minimizing the number of trainees on service, discontinuing external rotations, and converting in-person to online didactics have been broadly and swiftly implemented. While these innovations have promoted greater interconnectivity amongst institutions and made continuing medical education possible, international exchange programs in medical education are still largely disrupted. In response to the changing guidelines and restrictions necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the authors used Kern's six-step approach to design and implement a virtual curriculum to replace the in-person activities of the 2020-2021 Neurology Peru-Rochester exchange program (NeuroPro). Twenty-seven trainees participated in this virtual adaptation. The average daily attendance was ≥85% and the program was rated 9/10 on average in a feedback survey (63% response rate). The median percentage of correct answers during the pre-test was 64% and it increased to 79% during the post-test (P = 0.003). Virtual adaptation of international exchange programs in medical education is feasible to safely continue international collaborative efforts to promote symbiotic building of local expertise and cross-cultural exchange during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Continuing , Humans , Neurology/education , Pandemics
11.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(12): 672-678, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327706

ABSTRACT

In New Jersey, a statewide nurse residency program was implemented using an apprenticeship model. The pandemic created disruption to registered nurse residency programs. This included rapid restructuring of program delivery to online methods and a need to adapt curricula to reflect changing practice and guidelines. As a result of the pandemic, new graduates had educational gaps and nurse leaders experienced staffing shortages. First year program outcomes demonstrated a 90% retention of new graduates and financial benefits for organizations participating in the statewide nurse residency program.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Humans , Program Evaluation , Curriculum , New Jersey
12.
J Dent Educ ; 87(5): 599-605, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322360

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all modes of instruction were moved to virtual teaching for the matriculating endodontic residents at Boston University (BU) School of Dental Medicine (2020-2021). As dentistry is a very hands-on profession, the switch to virtual teaching comes with its own issues of concept retention, zoom fatigue, and limited interaction/lack of engagement between residents and faculty. There has already been a steady decline in the attendance of live lectures by medical and dental students, with students underscoring the ease of watching online lectures/recorded lectures and learning at their own pace. METHODS: This study took a mixed method observational research approach, with one group receiving the standard in-person (IP) teaching the previous year, and the other group receiving the new intervention of virtual teaching the subsequent year via the zoom platform. The two groups received the same curriculum in its entirety. End-of-semester written and oral exams were compared between the two cohorts along with their clinical assessment forms. One focus group was conducted individually with each class for the qualitative portion of this study. RESULTS: The class of residents receiving IP instruction scored higher in both written and oral components of the end-of-semester exam. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in their clinical performance and both groups improved in their exams and clinical performance over time. Focus groups highlighted themes emphasizing the importance of social connectedness and interactions, engagement, individual learning styles and motivating factors, zoom fatigue, and the need for a hybrid model of education. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was a difference in an exam performance of residents receiving IP versus virtual instruction, there was no impact on their clinical performance. However, subjectively, the lack of social connectedness impacted the overall learning experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Learning , Curriculum , Educational Measurement/methods
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 341, 2023 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the use of flipped classroom pedagogy based on "Internet plus" in teaching viral hepatitis in the lemology course during the COVID-19 epidemic. METHODS: This study included students from the clinical medicine general practitioner class at Nanjing Medical University's Kangda College, with the observation group consisting of 67 students from the 2020-2021 school year and the control group consisting of 70 students from the 2019-2020 school year. The observation group used "Internet plus" flipped classroom pedagogy, while the control group used conventional offline instruction. The theory course and case analysis ability scores from the two groups were compared and analyzed, and questionnaire surveys were administered to the observation group. RESULT: After the flipped classroom, the observation group had significantly higher theoretical test scores (38.62 ± 4.52) and case analysis ability scores (21.08 ± 3.58) than the control group (37.37 ± 2.43) (t = 2.024, P = 0.045) and (19.16 ± 1.15) (t = 4.254, P < 0.001), respectively. The questionnaire survey in the observation group revealed that the "Internet plus" flipped classroom pedagogy approach can help enhance students' enthusiasm to learn, clinical thinking ability, practical application ability, and learning efficiency, with satisfaction rates of 81.7%, 85.0%, 83.3%, and 78.8%, respectively; 89.4% of students expressed hope that whenever physical classes resumed, the offline courses could be combined with this pedagogy approach. CONCLUSION: The use of the "Internet plus" flipped classroom pedagogy technique for teaching viral hepatitis in a lemology course boosted students' theory learning ability as well as their case analysis ability. The majority of students were pleased with this type of instruction and hoped that whenever physical classes resumed, the offline courses may be integrated with the "Internet plus" flipped classroom pedagogical approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Learning , Physical Examination , Curriculum , Teaching
14.
Mil Med ; 188(Suppl 2): 75-80, 2023 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326034

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected almost every country around the world, and various forms of lockdown or quarantine measures were implemented. The lockdowns forced medical educators to step beyond traditional educational approaches and adopt distance education technologies to maintain continuity in the curriculum. This article presents selected strategies implemented by the Distance Learning Lab (DLL) at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USU), School of Medicine (SOM), in transitioning their instruction to an emergency distance education format during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: When moving programs/courses to a distance education format, it is important to recognize that two primary stakeholders are involved in the process: faculty members and students. Therefore, to be successful in transitioning to distance education, strategies must address the needs of both groups and provide support and resources for both.The DLL used two lenses of adult learning and targeted needs assessment to design faculty and student support during the pandemic. The DLL adopted a learner-centered approach to education, focusing on meeting the faculty members and students where they are. This translated into three specific support strategies for faculty: (1) workshops, (2) individualized support, and (3) just-in-time self-paced support. For students, DLL faculty members conducted orientation sessions and provided just-in-time self-paced support. RESULTS: The DLL has conducted 440 consultations and 120 workshops for faculty members since March 2020, serving 626 faculty members (above 70% of SOM faculty members locally) at USU. In addition, the faculty support website has had 633 visitors and 3,455 pageviews. Feedback comments provided by faculty members have specifically highlighted the personalized approach and the active, participatory elements of the workshops and consultations.Evaluations of the student orientation sessions showed that they felt more confident in using the technologies after the orientation. The biggest increase in confidence levels was seen in the topic areas and technology tools unfamiliar to them. However, even for tools that students were familiar with before the orientation, there was an increase in confidence ratings. CONCLUSION: Post-pandemic, the potential to use distance education remains. It is important to have support units that recognize and cater to the singular needs of medical faculty members and students as they continue to use distance technologies to facilitate student learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Adult , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Curriculum , Faculty, Medical
15.
Br Dent J ; 234(9): 672-676, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315917

ABSTRACT

Introduction In March 2020, a cohort of dental foundation trainees (DFTs) were affected by the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, in September 2020, a second cohort of DFTs began their training, with COVID-19 still affecting provision of primary dental care.Aims To study the effects of COVID-19 on these two cohorts by surveying Wales' dental core trainees (DCTs) who had been undertaking dental foundation training (DFTg) in 2019/20 and 2020/21.Materials and methods Following ethical approval, we conducted two online surveys for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 DFTs' cohorts. We compared and contrasted their reported completion of various DFTg curriculum components and any additional skills derived from redeployment.Results A response rate of 52% was achieved for both surveys. All participants successfully completed DFTg; although, some small differences were noted between the cohorts and their ability to fulfil all their portfolio requirements.Discussion Despite the effects of COVID-19, all DFTs were able to demonstrate completion of curriculum elements. The redeployment of three DFTs enhanced their learning. This was comparable to reports from other DFTs who were redeployed in the pandemic.Conclusions All DCTs surveyed from both cohorts successfully completed their DFTg portfolios. In some cases, additional skills were developed, which in the absence of the pandemic, may not have been the case.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Pandemics , Curriculum , Wales/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 39(3): E27-E31, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314761

ABSTRACT

This article will describe the creation and implementation of a remote learning failure to rescue (FTR) class with remote experiential simulation technology into a nurse residency program. The COVID-19 pandemic impacted traditional delivery methods for education within nurse residency programs. Following is the background of this hospital's nurse residency program and FTR curriculum and a description of the creation and implementation of a remote FTR class using internally developed remote experiential simulation technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Pandemics , Curriculum , Learning
17.
Rev Med Chil ; 150(9): 1248-1255, 2022 Sep.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313449

ABSTRACT

The essence of professional education not only involves transmitting knowledge, but also values and attitudes for a practice that allows us to face changing global and national scenarios. Physicians are currently facing new challenges derived from the impacts of the pandemic as well as the social crisis. Increased workload, limited access to health systems, economic uncertainty, and increased public scrutiny hamper physicians to fulfill their responsibilities to patients and society. Likewise, digital learning and few opportunities for face-to-face practice during the pandemic abruptly altered the training process for students and residents. In this essay, teaching of medical professionalism and its values is reviewed, considering the challenges posed by new social and healthcare contexts fort the future professional behavior. This commitment, however, requires not only ethical values but also humanism and social commitment. Medical professionalism acts as a stabilizing and morally protective social force. Thus, it is critical to fathom essential values of professionalism that characterize medical practice today. Indeed, the explicit incorporation of these values in undergraduate and postgraduate programs will undoubtedly allow the training of better professionals for the practice of medicine. (Rev Med Chile 2022; 150: 1248-1255).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Professionalism , Students , Curriculum
18.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1185845, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313412

ABSTRACT

The Educated Citizen and Public Health initiative promotes that an understanding of public health issues is a principal component of an educated population and is necessary to develop social responsibility and promote civic dialog. This initiative supports the Institute of Medicine's (now the National Academy of Medicine) recommendation that "all undergraduates should have access to education in public health." The purpose of our work is to examine the extent to which 2- and 4-year U.S. state colleges and universities offer and/or require a public health course. Select indicators identified include the presence and type of public health curriculum, public health course requirement, presence of public health graduate program offering, pathways to public health, Community Health Worker training, as well as demographic information for each institution. An analysis was also conducted for the historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and the same select indicators were examined. The data suggest that there is an imperative need for a public health curriculum across the nation's collegiate institutions with 26% of 4-year state institutions lacking a full undergraduate public health curriculum; 54% of 2-year colleges not offering a pathway to public health education; and 74% of HBCUs not offering a public health course or degree. In the age of COVID-19, syndemics, and considering the post-pandemic phase, we argue that expanding public health literacy at the associate and baccalaureate level can help prepare an educated citizenry who is both public health literate and one that can demonstrate resilience in the face of public health challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , United States , Humans , National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, U.S., Health and Medicine Division , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Education , Curriculum , Students
19.
AMA J Ethics ; 25(5): E324-331, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313079

ABSTRACT

Trauma-informed care is a transdisciplinary framework that existed well before 2020, but it is now more imperative to teach it and incorporate it into medical education. This paper describes a novel interprofessional curriculum and its focus on trauma-informed care-notably, including institutional and racial trauma-that was implemented by Yale University for medical, physician associate, and advanced practice registered nursing students.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Nursing , Humans , Curriculum , Interprofessional Relations
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