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1.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 18: 21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198656

ABSTRACT

This study presents the design, implementation, and lessons learned from 2 fit-for-purpose online interprofessional faculty development programs for educational practice improvement in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021. Both programs were designed to enhance teaching and learning practices in an interprofessional environment based on 4 pillars: professional diversity, egalitarianism, blended/online learning, and active learning strategies. A multidisciplinary mix of educators participated, showing similar results. The 3 main lessons learned were that the following factors facilitated an interprofessional environment: a professions-inclusive teaching style, a flexible learning climate, and interprofessional peer work. These lessons may be transferable to other programs seeking to enhance and support interprofessionality. Faculty development initiatives preparing educators for interprofessional practice should be an integral component of health professions education, as delivering these courses within professional silos is no longer justifiable. As the relevance of interprofessional education grows, an effective way of promoting interprofessonal education is to train the trainers in formal interprofessional settings.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Interprofessional Relations , Chile , Faculty , Health Occupations , Humans
4.
Health Promot J Austr ; 33 Suppl 1: 87-97, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157811

ABSTRACT

ISSUE ADDRESSED: The complexity and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the need to change training of public health professionals in higher education by shifting from siloed specialisations to interdisciplinary collaboration. At the end of 2020 and 2021, public health professionals collaboratively designed and delivered, a week-long intensive course-Public Health in Pandemics. The aim of this research study was to understand whether the use of systems thinking in the design and delivery of the course enabled students to grasp the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary health promotion and public health practice. RESEARCH METHODS: Two focus group interviews (n = 5 and 3/47) and a course opinion survey (n = 11/47) were utilised to gather information from students regarding experiences and perceptions of course design and delivery, and to determine if students felt better able to understand the complex nature of pandemics and pandemic responses. MAJOR FINDINGS: Students provided positive feedback on the course and believed that the course design and delivery assisted in understanding the complex nature of health problems and the ways in which health promotion and public health practitioners need to work across sectors with diverse disciplines for pandemic responses. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an integrated interdisciplinary approach to course design and delivery enabled students used systems thinking to understand the complexity in preparing for and responding to a pandemic. This approach may have utility in preparing an agile, iterative and adaptive health promotion and public health workforce more capable of facing the challenges and complexity in public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students , Public Health/education , Systems Analysis , Curriculum
5.
N Z Med J ; 135(1557): 38-48, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2147708

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The costs of being a medical student are large and increasing, and many students need to work part-time to meet financial pressures. This study explores the impact that part-time extracurricular paid work during the academic year has on medical student wellbeing, their interactions with the curriculum, and the effect of COVID-19 on work in 2020. METHODS: An online survey in 2020 gathered demographic, quantitative and qualitative information from medical students and their work experiences. Descriptive statistics analysed quantitative data; qualitative data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Of the 36% (n=530) of students who responded, 255 (49%) reported undertaking paid part-time work, with 59 (24%) reporting they would not be able to remain studying if they did not work. When interacting with the medical programme, 43% of students reported their work conflicted with scheduled medical school commitments, and 70% reported conflicts between work and individual study. COVID-19 disrupted 57% of paid work during the year. Impacts on students' wellbeing were both positive and negative. Positive aspects included developing new skills, self-confidence and resilience. Working also provided an escape from the study demands of the medical programme. Negative aspects were predominantly about the increased stress working had on students, specifically on the impact of paid work on their own health. CONCLUSIONS: Almost half of medical students work part-time while studying. Understanding the perceived implications that part-time work has on student education and wellbeing could help medical schools provide appropriate advice and pastoral support for their students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Employment , Humans , New Zealand
7.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(6): 586-589, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145157

ABSTRACT

In its first 2 decades, the NHS witnessed the near eradication of life-threatening community-acquired infections. However, medical advances have created different challenges (such as antimicrobial resistance and healthcare-associated infections) against a background of an increasingly ageing population. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a lack of parity with regards to provision of NHS 'infection services' (infectious diseases, microbiology and virology) across the UK, which urgently needs to be addressed. We recommend a fundamental review of NHS infection service provision: divided into four key areas. Firstly, there should be a consideration of a single multidisciplinary specialty of infection medicine removing barriers to training and service delivery. Secondly, streamline infection training via a single pathway through to certificate of completion of training, encompassing all aspects of infection service provision, for example, infection diagnostics, clinical care (including inpatient, outpatient and community based care), and infection prevention and control. There should be flexibility within the training curriculum to facilitate combined training with general internal medicine (GIM) as well as out of programme activities. Innovative ways of providing clinical experience should be considered, acknowledging the roles that medical microbiologists working closely with GIM colleagues in district general hospitals can play in managing patients with infections. Thirdly, formally commission a national network of specialised infectious diseases units with the creation of service standards. This can facilitate future pandemic resilience using a hub-and-spoke model utilising local infection expertise. Lastly, standardise the NHS framework to lead and coordinate development of integrated infection services at the local level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , State Medicine , Curriculum
8.
Br J Gen Pract ; 72(724): 532-533, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143821
9.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 104(19): 1769-1770, 2022 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141118

Subject(s)
Curriculum , Humanities , Humans
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 814, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Small group tutorials (SGT) promotes self-directed learning and is widely used in medical education. The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has accelerated the trend toward SGT digitalization, with unclear effect. We hypothesize that team dynamics and facilitator support influence SGT satisfaction in digital versus conventional SGT. METHODS: During the spring semester of year 2021, medical students (the second, third, and fourth year; n = 433) participating in conventional face-to-face and digital SGT curricula were enrolled. Participating students completed the collaborative learning attitude scale (including team dynamics, team acquaintance, and facilitator support dimensions) and teamwork satisfaction scale, previously validated for small-group collaborative learning, and chose preference between conventional or digital SGT in future curricula. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to extract the essential structural factors of these scales. Paired t-tests were conducted to compare differences in different dimensions and satisfaction between the conventional and digital SGT settings. Two sets of multiple regression analyses were done; one with team satisfaction scale results and the other with preference for digital SGT as the dependent variable were used to evaluate determinants of these two variables. RESULTS: The EFA results revealed that the original collaborative learning attitude scale was concentrated on two dimensions: team dynamics and facilitator support. No significant differences were noted between the SGT settings for the two dimensions and teamwork satisfaction. Regression analyses showed that teamwork dynamics was independently correlated with teamwork satisfaction in both conventional and digital SGT. Facilitator support was positively correlated with teamwork satisfaction in conventional, but not digital SGT. Higher teamwork satisfaction was an important determinant of preference for digital SGT among medical students. CONCLUSIONS: Team dynamics were closely linked to teamwork satisfaction among medical students in both conventional and digital SGT, while the role of facilitator support became less obvious during digital SGT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Interdisciplinary Placement , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum
11.
Public Health Nurs ; 39(6): 1255-1270, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The innovative Population Health Internship (PHI) addresses the evolving need for baccalaureate-prepared nurses to achieve population health competency. A comprehensive evaluation of the inaugural year of the PHI was conducted using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health and the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) curricular evaluation model. Students and community agency partners-both key stakeholders-contributed to the evaluation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Quantitative data were used to address functional and outcome areas of the PHI for purposes of PHI logistics, student learning gains, and program impact and sustainability. Qualitative data were used to provide insights into challenges in instituting curricular change, complexity in student-agency communications, importance of student preparedness/attitude, issues of role confusion, misperceptions about the population health nursing role, student learning, and impacts on partner agencies and their populations. IMPLICATIONS: Educational implications include the importance of assessing both learning gains and student buy-in, the need for a long-term evaluation approach to accommodate for challenges related to radical curriculum change, and the importance of strong stakeholder support to facilitate mutually beneficial relationships and a positive learning experience.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Internship and Residency , Population Health , Students, Nursing , Humans , Curriculum , Students , Learning , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e065930, 2022 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119468

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Interprofessional education is a relatively new addition to health professional education curricula in the Arab world. To understand current practice in this area, a scoping review will enable reporting of essential elements for the implementation of interprofessional education. The objective of this scoping review is to report on the implementation components, including presage, process and product, of interprofessional education in prelicensure health professions education programmes in the Arab world. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A comprehensive and systematic search for literature will be conducted using eight electronic databases from their inception to September 2022. A presearch was devised in PubMed, Scopus and CINAHL using a combination of terms related to population, context and concept. The Covidence Systematic Review tool will be used for blind screening, selection and conflict resolution. Data will be presented in tabular format and as a narrative synthesis and will include elements that support the implementation of interprofessional education. This review will be presented according to the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology.Studies conducted with students and/or faculty in prelicensure health professions education programmes will be included. The concept to be explored is interprofessional education. The context is the region commonly known as the Arab world, which includes 18 countries, sharing many common social and cultural traditions and where Arabic is the first language.Excluded will be studies conducted on collaborative practice of health professionals and postlicensure interprofessional education. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval was required. Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed articles.


Subject(s)
Arab World , Health Personnel , Interprofessional Education , Humans , Curriculum , Health Occupations , Health Personnel/education , Research Design
14.
Clin Transl Sci ; 15(11): 2555-2566, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118569

ABSTRACT

In this communication, the authors offer considerations for how the scientific community can capitalize on decades of translational science advances and experiential knowledge to develop new education opportunities for a diverse and highly skilled translational science workforce. Continued advancement of the field of translational science will require new education approaches that distill key concepts in translational science from past and ongoing research initiatives and teach this foundational knowledge to current and future translational scientists. These key concepts include generalizable scientific and operational principles to guide translational science, as well as evidence-informed practices. Inspired by this approach, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has developed an initial set of guiding principles for translational science generated via case studies of multiple highly successful translational science initiatives, and is now teaching them via new education activities that aim to reach a broad scientific audience interested in translational science. Our goal with this review is to prompt continued conversation with the translational science community regarding capitalizing on our collective translational science knowledge to advance core content for translational science education and disseminating this content to a broad range of scientific audiences.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Translational Science, Biomedical , Humans
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 795, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The flipped classroom blended learning model has been proven effective in the teaching of undergraduate medical courses as shown by student acceptance and results. Since COVID-19 necessitated the application of online learning in Histology practical for MBBS students, the effectiveness of the blended learning model on teaching quality has required additional attention. METHODS: A blended learning of histology practical was flipped in a virtual classroom (FVCR-BL) or in a physical classroom (FPCR-BL) in School of Medicine, Zhejiang University in China. Students were split into FVCR-BL group (n = 146) due to COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 or were randomly allocated into FPCR-BL group (n = 93) in 2021, and retrospectively, students with traditional learning in 2019 were allocated into traditional learning model in a physical classroom (PCR-TL) group (n = 89). Same learning requirements were given for 3 groups; all informative and summative scores of students were collected; a questionnaire of student satisfaction for blended learning activities were surveyed in 2021. Data of scores and scales were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test in SPSS Statics software. RESULTS: The results clarified that FPCR-BL students obtained higher final exam scores and were more likely to engage in face-to-face interactions with instructors than FVCR-BL students. FPCR-BL and FVCR-BL students had higher classroom quiz scores than the PCR-TL students owing to the contribution of blended learning. The results of the questionnaire showed that participants of FPCR-BL positively rated the online learning and preview test, with a cumulative percentage of 68.31%, were more satisfying than other learning activities of blended learning. There were significant correlations (r = 0.581, P < 0.05) between online learning and the other three blended learning strategies. CONCLUSIONS: In the flipped classroom with a blended learning process of histology practical, enhancing the quality of online learning boosts student satisfaction and improves knowledge learning; peer-to-peer interactions and instructor-to-peer interactions in the physical classroom improved knowledge construction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Problem-Based Learning , Humans , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Curriculum , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Students
16.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 29(6): 520-525, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115727

ABSTRACT

Kidney pathology education is a critical component in training of nephrology fellows, as well as for continuing medical education for practicing nephrologists. Kidney pathology images are included on nephrology fellow board exams, and clinicopathologic correlation of kidney biopsy findings is critical in everyday clinical practice. Nephropathology training is a requirement by the American College of Graduate Medical Education within nephrology fellowship curricula. However, greater than one-third of fellowship program directors believe that nephropathology training for their fellows is not sufficient. During the Coronavirus Disease-19 pandemic, the use of digital learning has become commonplace with virtual conferences (local, national, and international) and online meetings becoming the norm for education. Nephrology has become a leader in free open-access online medical education, both prior to and, to even a greater extent, during the pandemic. Here, we review available resources to nephrology fellows and other learners to supplement nephropathology training, which includes medical blogs, journal clubs, interactive quizzes and games, online conferences, podcasts, and mentorship opportunities. These resources are archived and provide durable content to learners of all stages of training, even beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nephrology , Humans , United States , Nephrology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Kidney/pathology , Curriculum
17.
Curationis ; 45(1): e1-e6, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Nursing education institutions have had to change from face-to-face to online learning because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The online learning mode, however, had several challenges. OBJECTIVES:  To explore and describe recommendations made to address the online learning challenges in nursing education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD:  This study adopted a narrative literature review to achieve its objectives. The search for the relevant literature used Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, African Journal (previously SAePublications), EBSCOhost, EBSCO Discovery Service and Scopus databases. RESULTS:  There were four findings identified from the literature search: provision of adequate resources, monitoring of academic dishonesty, provision of technical support and revision of the curriculum. CONCLUSION:  More work in nursing education is necessary to address the challenges of adopting online learning during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. To meet the issues of online learning in nursing education, thorough preparations and safeguards are necessary.Contribution: The outcomes of this study will benefit nursing education by incorporating recommendations from many studies to overcome online learning issues in nursing education during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , Curriculum
18.
Surgeon ; 20(6): e405-e409, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106017

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, regular teaching for core surgical trainees (CSTs) in Northern Ireland was cancelled at short notice, leaving a significant gap in training. We aimed to develop an effective core surgical teaching programme, within the remit of government regulations, to ensure training was not negatively affected by COVID-19. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A novel virtual teaching programme was designed and implemented regionally across Northern Ireland. One-year free Affiliate Membership to the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) was provided for Northern Ireland CSTs, allowing access to RCSEd online webinars. A weekly teaching schedule based on the Member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) exam curriculum and accompanied by a webinar was created and disseminated to trainees. Senior surgeons were recruited to conduct a virtual teaching session via videoconferencing. RESULTS: Ten teaching sessions were conducted over three months. Feedback was collated, with positive results and requests for virtual teaching to continue. As such, the Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency (NIMDTA) adopted the teaching programme as their new primary method of central teaching for Northern Ireland CSTs during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: A novel, highly successful teaching programme was developed in Northern Ireland to meet the training needs of CSTs resulting in a sustained change to training. Virtual surgical teaching can be as effective as face-to-face didactic learning and may be imperative in a foreseeably socially distanced world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Surgeons/education , Videoconferencing
19.
South Med J ; 115(11): 808-812, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100460

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic required a multifaceted response by healthcare professionals. Medical students played only a limited role in the early response, resulting in feelings of disengagement. The authors developed a discussion-based elective course reviewing the COVID-19 response to address this gap in medical student education. METHODS: Preclinical medical students enrolled in this elective participated in weekly virtual interactive seminars led by expert faculty members. Students completed a final survey quantifying their understanding of the overall COVID-19 response, knowledge of its individual facets, and their feelings of personal engagement on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the most understanding or engagement. The differences in mean scores on "precourse" and "postcourse" surveys were compared. RESULTS: A total of 65 students enrolled in the elective. Students demonstrated significant improvement in perceived holistic understanding of the response of the medical field to the COVID-19 pandemic (P < 0.001) and in feelings of personal engagement with the pandemic (P < 0.001). In addition, students reported a significantly increased understanding of each facet of the pandemic response covered in the course (8 questions; all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Preclinical medical student participation in a discussion-based seminar course reviewing the COVID-19 pandemic significantly increased feelings of engagement with and understanding of the response of the medical field to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Curriculum
20.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 96, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100230

ABSTRACT

Background: Education and capacity building in palliative care are greatly needed in Nigeria. Currently, two institutions integrate palliative care into the undergraduate medical curriculum and no post graduate training exists. A team from the University of Lagos in Nigeria and Northwestern University in the US collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a 12-hour virtual palliative care training program for Nigerian health professionals. Objective: This study investigated the impact of the first session of the training program on healthcare professionals' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence in palliative care. Methods: The Education in Palliative and End-of-Life (EPEC) curriculum and the Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) curriculum were used as foundations for the program and adapted for the Nigerian context. Delivered online, the training focused on goals of palliative care, whole patient assessment, communication skills, pain management, psychosocial issues, palliative care in COVID, oncology, and HIV. A mixed-methods evaluation based on Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework was used and data were gathered from surveys and focus groups. Findings: Thirty-five health professionals completed the training. The training had a positive impact on knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Confidence in providing end-of-life care increased from 27.3% to 92.9% while confidence in prescribing medication to relieve symptoms at the end of life increased from 42.9% to 92.0%. Performance on multiple-choice knowledge tests increased by 10% (p < 0.01). All participants stated that they would recommend the program to a peer while 96.4% reported the program was relevant to the Nigerian context. Qualitative analysis suggested that the training would help participants provide more holistic care for patients, communicate better, and change how they interacted with families. Topics to be addressed in future training were identified. Conclusions: This virtual training can be an important element in palliative care capacity building in Nigeria and represents a model for global health collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Humans , Palliative Care , Nigeria , Curriculum , Workforce
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