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1.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 537-540, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598060

ABSTRACT

When we look back on 2020, it is hard not to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic that has affected everything from nursing practice to world politics. Along with those challenges, there has been tremendous opportunity for nursing professional development change and growth. 2020 brought several key issues into play related to nursing continuing professional development. This article highlights many of these important issues. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):537-540.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Staff Development/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
2.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11190, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599218

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The morbidity and mortality (M&M) conference has long been a part of the education of residents of all specialties in the United States, yet its structure is variable across training programs. Recent literature has described the use of M&M as a forum for education in quality improvement methodology; however, a structure focusing on education in cognitive biases and errors has not been previously described in MedEdPORTAL. Methods: This structured M&M conference series called upon resident presenters and peers in the audience to examine cognitive biases and errors involved in specific patient cases. Associated materials included preparatory guidelines provided to faculty advisors and resident presenters, a presentation template used during the introductory session, and a handout used during the discussion portions of presentations. Results: During the 2019-2020 academic year, a total of 24 PGY 2 pediatrics residents presented M&M cases. They identified a mean of 3.7 (SD = 1.9) cognitive biases and/or errors per case and a mean of 1.7 (SD = 0.7) debiasing strategies per case. Peers in the audience were also successful in identifying potential biases and errors at play during presentations. Discussion: We found that through this M&M conference structure, residents were able to demonstrate the ability to identify cognitive errors and biases both within themselves and in peers. This provided an effective forum for the identification and discussion of debiasing strategies, even when the series was forced to transition to a virtual format due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Bias , Child , Cognition , Curriculum , Humans , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
3.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11205, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594933

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hyperleukocytosis, an infrequent presentation of new-onset leukemia, is a medical emergency requiring prompt recognition and treatment. It can include altered mental status, fever, critical electrolyte derangements, and coagulopathies. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this simulation was created as a telesimulation in order to adhere to mandatory physical distancing guidelines while addressing learning objectives. Methods: This simulation was designed for pediatric emergency medicine fellows and featured a pediatric patient presenting with fever, altered mental status, and respiratory distress. After an initial assessment and appropriate workup, the patient developed tumor lysis syndrome, coagulopathies, and new-onset neurologic changes requiring appropriate interventions. A debriefing guide and participant evaluation form were utilized. Results: This telesimulation was implemented at five different institutions, with evaluation surveys completed by 22 pediatric emergency medicine fellows. The scenario was rated on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) and was generally well received, with participants rating the simulation as effective in teaching the recognition (M = 4.8) and management (M = 4.6) of hyperleukocytosis. Participants felt that virtual telesimulation was effective compared to other distance learning methods (M = 3.9). Discussion: This simulation-based curriculum allows learners to practice identifying and managing hyperleukocytosis. We found that it was well received in both in-person and virtual formats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatric Emergency Medicine , Child , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592746

ABSTRACT

Medical humanity is an essential element of medical education, and the respective courses are introduced to the curricula of medical schools worldwide. However, significant differences in this type of medical education were identified in Italy, Spain, and the UK. In Poland, this issue was not yet analyzed. The classes offered on a compulsory and not elective basis secure the uniform skills of future physicians. Therefore, we were prompted to ask a question: do Polish medical students receive equal compulsory education in medical humanities? To answer that question, we performed a content analysis of mandatory classes' frequency, types, and content on medical humanization and communication in Polish medical schools. The study used publicly available information provided on the home pages of the universities to perform content and comparative analyses. Of 22 identified universities, 15 had publicly listed teaching programs, and nine had freely available syllabi. The names and types of courses varied from school to school. The number of hours the courses offered throughout medical education ranged from 15 to 216. In some medical schools, the classes were scheduled during the early, pre-clinical part of the study, whereas in other schools they were offered each year. The content of the courses always covered the topics of physician-patient communication but rarely offered protocols, such as the Calgary Cambridge guide. We conclude that the medical humanities represented by medical humanization and communication courses are included in the publicly available compulsory curriculum of most Polish medical schools. However, to secure equal education of future Polish physicians, there is a need to unify the medical humanities program.


Subject(s)
Humanities , Schools, Medical , Communication , Curriculum , Humans , Poland
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580743

ABSTRACT

Most medical and health science schools adopt innovative tools to implement the teaching of anatomy to their undergraduate students. The increase in technological resources for educational purposes allows the use of virtual systems in the field of medicine, which can be considered decisive for improving anatomical knowledge, a requisite for safe and competent medical practice. Among these virtual tools, the Anatomage Table 7.0 represents, to date, a pivotal anatomical device for student education and training medical professionals. This review focuses attention on the potential of the Anatomage Table in the anatomical learning process and clinical practice by discussing these topics based on recent publication findings and describing their trends during the COVID-19 pandemic period. The reports documented a great interest in and a positive impact of the use of this technological table by medical students for teaching gross anatomy. Anatomage allows to describe, with accuracy and at high resolution, organ structure, vascularization, and innervation, as well as enables to familiarize with radiological images of real patients by improving knowledge in the radiological and surgical fields. Furthermore, its use can be considered strategic in a pandemic period, since it ensures, through an online platform, the continuation of anatomical and surgical training on dissecting cadavers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Dissection , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1876316, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575921

ABSTRACT

Changes in medical student learning preferences help drive innovation in teaching and require schools and commercial resources to quickly adapt. However, few studies have detailed the relationship of learner preferences to the environment and teaching modalities used in the pre-clerkship years, nor do they incorporate third-party resources. Our study attempts to analyze learner preferences by comparing the use of traditional and third-party resources. In 2017-18, a survey was distributed to medical students and residents at two accredited medical schools. Participants noted preferred styles of learning regarding lecture duration, timing, location, format, third-party resources, learner types and USMLE Step 1 scores. The 'Learning Environment, Learning Processes, and Learning Outcomes' (LEPO) framework [5] was used to examine learner preferences, with responses compared using the Mann-Whitney U and two proportion z-tests. A total of 329 respondents completed the survey: 62.7% medical students and 37.3% residents. The majority of participants identified their learning style by Kolb [6] as converging (33.0%) or accommodating (39.2%). Students preferred lectures 30-40 minutes long (43.3%), during morning hours (54.2%), in their own homes (52.0%), via online lectures with simultaneous drawings (56.0%), and classroom/podcast lectures with PowerPoint® presentations (54.3%). Overall, students rated third-party resource characteristics higher than traditional curricula, including effectiveness of teachers, length, quality, time of day, and venue (p < 0.001), but also preferred small group formats. Students reported animated videos (46.6%) and simultaneous drawings (46.5%) as the most effective means of retaining information. Understanding changing learner preferences is important in creating optimal curricula for today's students. Using the LEPO framework, this study identifies critical preferences in successfully teaching medical students, inclusive of commercial and traditional resources. These results can also help guide changes in pedagogy necessary due to the more recent COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Choice Behavior , Electronics , Learning , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574791

ABSTRACT

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Curriculum , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1911019, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574085

ABSTRACT

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine visits surged to increase access and maintain continuity of care, while reducing transmission of disease. However, few curricula exist for training residents on how to care for patients via telemedicine, especially in pediatrics. We aimed to create and evaluate an interactive, competency-based pilot curriculum, to meet the urgent need to train residents in telemedicine. The curriculum was developed in 2020 and includes a didactic, cased-based discussions, and direct observation exercise. A model for precepting residents, adhering to new ACGME guidelines, was also created to further engage residents in telemedicine in the outpatient general pediatrics settings. To evaluate the curriculum, we assessed feasibility of a direct observation to provide feedback and we conducted pre and post surveys to assess for changes in residents' self-reported skills in performing telemedicine visits following implementation of the curriculum. 16 residents participated in the curriculum and 15 completed both the pre and post surveys (93%). Residents' self-reported efficacy in performing key components of telemedicine visits, including completion of telemedicine visit (p = 0.023), initiation of visits (p = 0.01), and documentation (p = 0.001) all improved significantly following implementation. Residents' perception of patient satisfaction with telemedicine and personal perception of ease of use of the telemedicine system increased, though neither were statistically significant. Uptake of the direct observation exercise was nearly universal, with all but one resident having a direct observation completed during their ambulatory month. This novel, interactive telemedicine pilot curriculum for residents addresses ACGME competencies and provides residents with a toolkit for engaging in telemedicine.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Child , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface
9.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1653-1660, 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572711

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Educational interventions targeting health care professionals can contribute to improving knowledge and behaviors of antimicrobial agents prescribing. However, the unprecedented COVID-19 outbreak caused a disruption of the current practices and treatment guidelines. Therefore, it is highly likely that the pandemic had its disruptive effect on any educational interventions that were going on during the outbreak. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in improving antimicrobial agents prescribing. METHODOLOGY: This was a randomized controlled study that included 69 resident physicians in a teaching hospital. The intervention group received an educational intervention focusing on antimicrobial agents prescribing and resistance. Before and after the intervention, outpatient antimicrobial agents prescribing rates for the two study arms were compared for the pre- and post-intervention periods. Additionally, all participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire that measured their knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intention towards antimicrobial agents resistance and prescription. The post-intervention period included the months of February, March, and June 2020. April and May were excluded from the study period since clinics were closed due to the COVID -19 pandemic. RESULTS: Post-intervention, the rate of antimicrobial agents prescribing by the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.001). Mean fear score for the intervention group was significantly lower than that for the control group after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate failure of the educational intervention in improving antimicrobial agents prescribing. However, an unexpected counter effect of the COVID-19 outbreak is highly likely.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Curriculum , Education, Medical , Fear , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Jordan , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Med Teach ; 43(5): 546-553, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a growing literature on how medical education adapts to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there is a need to examine the facilitators and barriers of these adaptations. This study explores the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of how Italian medical schools adapted their curricula to the COVID -19 pandemic. METHODS: The authors conducted an online survey of directors of medical curricula in Italy. Free-text responses to open-ended questions about curricular adaptations and reflections on these adaptations were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. RESULTS: Twenty out of 60 Italian medical school directors completed the survey. Strengths identified were rapid responses and a spirit of cooperation. Weaknesses included dependency on clinical facilities, teachers' limited skills to use technology, and lack of mental health support for staff. Opportunities highlighted were clear government rules, new ways of teaching and a renewed focus on underrepresented topics. Threats expressed included impaired relationships, difficulties related to online assessment, lack of IT access, and legal and insurance issues. CONCLUSIONS: This study, in documenting the curricular adaptations of Italian medical schools during an active global pandemic, and recording the perspectives of medical education leaders, offers important lessons for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/trends , Humans , Italy , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554984

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic struck globally and has affected higher education institutions (HEIs) and their operations, indirectly impacting the progress of the Sustainable Development Goal 4 achieved thus far. This article addresses HEIs achievements and challenges experienced in the wake of the pandemic. Online news media reports played a facilitative role in providing information to the HEI communities. A rapid review exploring online news media messages relating to higher education at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Africa was utilised. Narrative synthesis was used to analyse the data. The results highlight HEIs achievements, which aim to ensure that all students receive the same level of education and provision in terms of devices and mental health support. However, challenges were also experienced at HEIs and include students feeling uncertainty and fear regarding completing their education. Furthermore, the results also show that not all students received the same level of education due to contextual factors, thus deepening the existing social disparities in Africa. The pandemic provides an opportunity for HEIs to embed the components of global citizenship education into the curriculum and to work in an innovative way to promote Sustainable Development Goal 4.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(8): 2408-2413, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549541

ABSTRACT

Scholars from a range of disciplines including medicine, sociology, psychology, and philosophy have addressed the concepts of ambiguity and uncertainty in medical practice and training. Most of this scholarship has been descriptive, focusing on defining and measuring ambiguity and uncertainty tolerance or tracking clinicians' responses to ambiguous and uncertain situations. Meanwhile, scholars have neglected some fundamental normative questions: Is tolerance of uncertainty good; if so, to what extent? Using a philosophical approach to these questions, we show that neither tolerance nor intolerance of uncertainty is necessarily a good or bad trait. Rather, both tolerance and intolerance of uncertainty can give physicians advantages while at the same time exposing them to pitfalls in clinical practice. After making this case, we argue that cultivating certain virtues-like courage, diligence, and curiosity-could help clinicians avoid the dangers of excessive tolerance and intolerance of uncertainty. Finally, we suggest that medical educators develop curricula and career counseling beginning with matriculation and proceeding through specialty choice and residency training that explicitly address trainees' responses to clinical uncertainty. These programs should encourage trainees, students and residents, to be mindful of their reactions to uncertainty and help them develop virtues that will allow them to avoid the hazards of extreme tolerance or intolerance of uncertainty.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Physicians , Clinical Decision-Making , Curriculum , Humans , Uncertainty
13.
Glob Health Sci Pract ; 9(3): 690-697, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542965

ABSTRACT

Emergency medicine (EM) is rapidly being recognized as a specialty around the globe. This has particular promise for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) that experience the largest burden of disease for emergency conditions. Specialty education and training in EM remain essentially an apprenticeship model. Finding the required expertise to educate graduate learners can be challenging in regions where there are low densities of specialty providers.We describe an initiative to implement a sustainable, bidirectional partnership between the Emergency Medicine Departments of Weill Cornell Medicine (WCM) in New York, NY, USA, and Bugando Medical Center (BMC) in Mwanza, Tanzania. We used synchronous and asynchronous telecommunication technology to enhance an ongoing emergency medicine education collaboration.The Internet infrastructure for this collaboration was created by bolstering 4G services available in Mwanza, Tanzania. By maximizing the 4G signal, sufficient bandwidth could be created to allow for live 2-way audio/video communication. Using synchronous and asynchronous applications such as Zoom and WhatsApp, providers at WCM and BMC can attend real-time didactic lectures, participate in discussion forums on clinical topics, and collaborate on the development of clinical protocols. Proof of concept exercises demonstrated that this system can be used for real-time mentoring in EKG interpretation and ultrasound technique, for example. This system was also used to share information and develop operations flows during the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of telecommunication technology and e-learning in a format that promotes long-term, sustainable interaction is practical and innovative, provides benefit to all partners, and should be considered as a mechanism by which global partnerships can assist with training in emergency medicine in LMICs.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Emergency Medicine/education , Emergency Medicine/methods , Academic Medical Centers , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Mobile Applications , New York City , Social Media , Tanzania
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 587, 2021 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526630

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A new corona virus called COVID-19 and its epidemic has affected health care systems in many ways. There have also been significant changes in dental education. The present study summarizes the findings about dental education resulting from a scoping review of COVID-19 and dentistry. METHODS: First, a comprehensive search of five databases (Google Scholar, Medline through PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane Central) was conducted with the keywords: COVID-19 and its equivalent terms, dentistry, education, oral, students, curriculum, and academics. Articles related to oral health and COVID-19 were searched. Then articles on the subject of dental education were screened and reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 1389 articles investigating COVID-19 and dentistry, 135 articles were related to dental education and its relationship with COVID-19. The most articles in this field were from the United States, India, and Saudi Arabia. Most of the articles were cross-sectional and then review articles. Based on the review the articles were divided into two main categories of changes and concerns, and opportunities and solutions. Moreover, the following themes were extracted: teaching-learning quality and methods, study career and how students are prepared, infection control policies, theses, exams and assessments, financial and economic security, students and staff's mental health, school's policies and curricula, knowledge of students and staff about COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Dental education now faces big challenges, some of which have never been experienced before. On the other hand, the epidemic has created opportunities for dental education as well. Most of these challenges and opportunities are the same around the world, and the findings of the present study can be a good help to overcome the challenges ahead as well as a good reference to find the right questions to be answered in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum , Education, Dental , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 576, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526628

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is growing recognition that wellness interventions should occur in context and acknowledge complex contributors to wellbeing, including individual needs, institutional and cultural barriers to wellbeing, as well as systems issues which propagate distress. The authors conducted a multiple-methods study exploring contributors to wellbeing for junior residents in diverse medical environments who participated in a brief resilience and stress-reduction curriculum, the Stress Management and Resiliency Training Program for Residents (SMART-R). METHODS: Using a waitlist-controlled design, the curriculum was implemented for post-graduate year (PGY)-1 or PGY-2 residents in seven residency programs across three sites. Every three months, residents completed surveys, including the Perceived Stress Scale-10, General Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, a mindfulness scale (CAMSR), and a depression screen (PHQ-2). Residents also answered free-text reflection questions about psychological wellbeing and health behaviors. RESULTS: The SMART-R intervention was not significantly associated with decreased perceived stress. Linear regression modeling showed that depression was positively correlated with reported stress levels, while male sex and self-efficacy were negatively correlated with stress. Qualitative analysis elucidated differences in these groups: Residents with lower self-efficacy, those with a positive depression screen, and/or female residents were more likely to describe experiencing lack of control over work. Residents with higher self-efficacy described more positive health behaviors. Residents with a positive depression screen were more self-critical, and more likely to describe negative personal life events. CONCLUSIONS: This curriculum did not significantly modify junior residents' stress. Certain subpopulations experienced greater stress than others (female residents, those with lower self-efficacy, and those with a positive depression screen). Qualitative findings from this study highlight universal stressful experiences early in residency, as well as important differences in experience of the learning environment among subgroups. Tailored wellness interventions that aim to support diverse resident sub-groups may be higher yield than a "one size fits all" approach. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02621801 , Registration date: December 4, 2015 - Retrospectively registered.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Medicine , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e054746, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526505

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum for cricothyrotomy using wet towels to suppress aerosolisation during a pandemic. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental, pre-post study. SETTING: Tertiary care, academic medical centre in Chicago. PARTICIPANTS: Ear, nose and throat and general surgery residents, fellows and attendings. INTERVENTION: Cricothyroidotomy simulation-based mastery learning curriculum. OUTCOMES MEASURE: Pretest to posttest simulated cricothyrotomy skills checklist performance. RESULTS: 37 of 41 eligible surgeons participated in the curriculum. Median pretest score was 72.5 (IQR 55.0-80.0) and 100.0 (IQR 98.8-100.0) for the posttest p<0.001. All participants scored at or above a minimum passing standard (93% checklist items correct) at posttest. CONCLUSIONS: Using SBML is effective to quickly train clinicians to competently perform simulated cricothyrotomy during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Academic Medical Centers , Clinical Competence , Cohort Studies , Curriculum , Humans
17.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(11): 3497-3502, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine (TM) experiences in undergraduate medical education were uncommon. When students' clinical experiences were interrupted due to the pandemic, TM education provided opportunities for students to participate in clinical care while adhering to social distancing guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of TM experiences in the internal medicine (IM) core clerkship experience prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, during interruption in clinical clerkships, and following the return to in-person activities at US medical schools. DESIGN: The Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) survey is a national, annually recurring thematic survey of IM core clerkship directors. The 2020 survey focused on effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including a section about TM. The survey was fielded online from August through October 2020. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 137 core clinical medicine clerkship directors at Liaison Committee on Medical Education fully accredited US/US territory-based medical schools. MAIN MEASURES: A 10-item thematic survey section assessing student participation in TM and assessment of TM-related competencies. KEY RESULTS: The response rate was 73.7% (101/137 medical schools). No respondents reported TM curricular experiences prior to the pandemic. During clinical interruption, 39.3% of respondents reported TM experiences in the IM clerkship, whereas 24.7% reported such experiences occurring at the time they completed the survey. A higher percentage of clerkships with an ambulatory component reported TM to be an important competency compared to those without an ambulatory component. CONCLUSIONS: The extent to which TM was used in the IM clinical clerkship, and across clinical clerkships, increased substantially when medical students were removed from in-person clinical duties as a response to COVID-19. When students returned to in-person clinical duties, experiences in TM continued, suggesting the continued value of TM as part of the formal education of students during the medicine clerkship. Curricula and faculty development will be needed to support TM education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Telemedicine , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 50(1): 65, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply impacted healthcare and education systems, including resident education. The impact of the pandemic on the different types of pedagogical activities, and the displacement of pedagogical activities to online modalities have not yet been quantified. We sought to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on formal pedagogic components of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) residency, the switch to distance learning and program director's perceptions of the future of teaching and learning. METHODS: A nationwide online survey was conducted on Canadian ORL-HNS program directors. The use of standard didactic activities in-person and online, before and during the pandemic was rated with Likert scales. Perceptions of the pandemic were described with open-ended questions. RESULTS: A total of 11 of the 13 program directors contacted responded. The analysis were conducted using nonparametric statistics. There was a significant drop in overall didactic activities during the pandemic, regardless of the teaching format (3.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.3, p < 0.05). The most affected activities were simulation and in-house lectures. Online activities increased dramatically (0.5 ± 0.2 to 5.0 ± 0.5, p < 0.001), including attendance to lectures made by other programs (0.5 ± 0.3 to 4.0 ± 0.8, p < 0.05). Respondents stated their intention to maintain the hybrid online and in-person teaching model. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hybrid online and in-person teaching is likely to persist in the post-pandemic setting. A balanced residency curriculum requires diversity in academic activities. The pandemic can have positive consequences if higher education institutions work to better support distance teaching and learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Internship and Residency/methods , Otolaryngology/education , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Canada , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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