Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 34
Filter
2.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 101, 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Germany, the first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was registered on 28 January 2020. By February 2021, the third wave of the pandemic began. So far, only few data are available on the SARS-CoV-2 prevalence and the clinical impact of an infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: From February 2020 until March 2021, we screened 156 CF patients for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies (serology) and the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in deep throat saliva or nasopharyngeal swabs (molecular testing). From patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, we recorded symptoms and collected clinical data. RESULTS: In total, 13 patients (8.3%) were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection, most of them during the second and the beginning third wave of the pandemic. Ten positive tested patients described symptoms linked to COVID-19. The most common symptom was cough followed by fatigue and headache. SARS-CoV-2 infection did not impair lung function. No positive tested patient needed to be hospitalized. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infections in patients with CF are not as rare as initially anticipated, as frequent testing revealed. However, infected patients did not experience more severe clinical courses or worse clinical outcome. Our observation is in line with published reports indicating that individuals with CF are not at higher risk for severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/physiopathology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Pulmonary Ventilation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 21(3): e176-e183, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with cystic fibrosis (pwCF) may be at risk of complications from COVID-19 but the impact of COVID-19 on pwCF remains unknown. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic first wave on pwCF in the New York metropolitan area (NY) from March 1, 2020 to August 31, 2020. Objectives were to determine (1) the prevalence of COVID-19 by PCR and IgG antibody testing, (2) the clinical characteristics of COVID-19, (3) delay in routine outpatient care, and (4) the effect on anxiety and depression in pwCF. RESULTS: There were 26 COVID-19 cases diagnosed by PCR or antibody testing among the study cohort of 810 pwCF. The prevalence of COVID-19 by PCR (1.6%) and IgG antibody (12.2%) testing was low. 58% of cases were asymptomatic and 82% were managed at home. 8% were hospitalized and 1 person died. 89% of pwCF experienced delay in care. The prevalence of anxiety increased from 43% baseline to 58% during the pandemic (P<0.01). In post-hoc analysis, the proportion of patients with diabetes (38% versus 16%, P<0.01) and pancreatic insufficiency (96% versus 66%, P<0.01) were higher while CFTR modulator use was lower (46% versus 65%, P = 0.05) in pwCF who tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of COVID-19 among pwCF in NY during the pandemic first wave was low and most cases were managed at home. CFTR modulators may be protective. PwCF experienced delay in routine care and increased anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator/genetics , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
4.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 205(11): 1271-1280, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1698208

ABSTRACT

A dramatic global reduction in the incidence of common seasonal respiratory viral infections has resulted from measures to limit the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during the pandemic. This has been accompanied by falls reaching 50% internationally in the incidence of acute exacerbations of preexisting chronic respiratory diseases that include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis. At the same time, the incidence of acute bacterial pneumonia and sepsis has fallen steeply worldwide. Such findings demonstrate the profound impact of common respiratory viruses on the course of these global illnesses. Reduced transmission of common respiratory bacterial pathogens and their interactions with viruses appear also as central factors. This review summarizes pandemic changes in exacerbation rates of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and pneumonia. We draw attention to the substantial body of knowledge about respiratory virus infections in these conditions, and that it has not yet translated into clinical practice. Now that the large scale of benefits that could be gained by managing these pathogens is unmistakable, we suggest that the field merits substantial academic and industrial investment. We consider how pandemic-inspired measures for prevention and treatment of common infections should become a cornerstone for managing respiratory diseases.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Pneumonia, Bacterial , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virus Diseases , Viruses , Asthma/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/microbiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Indian J Pediatr ; 89(4): 404-406, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653777

ABSTRACT

Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) constitute a high-risk group for COVID-19 with underlying chronic lung disease. COVID-19 severity varying from mild infection to need of intensive care has been described in children with CF. Two children with significant underlying pulmonary morbidity are described here, who developed severe disease following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Case 1 (a 9-y-old boy) had pneumonia with respiratory failure requiring noninvasive ventilation support. He had delayed clearance of SARS-CoV-2, with recurrence of symptomatic disease with short asymptomatic period in between. He was also diagnosed with CF-related diabetes and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis during the second episode. Case 2 (an 18-mo-old boy) had two episodes of SARS-CoV-2-related severe lower respiratory infection within a period of 2 mo, requiring high-flow nasal oxygen support. Both children had 3rd pulmonary exacerbation but SARS-CoV-2 was not detected in respiratory secretions. To conclude, children with CF with underlying pulmonary morbidity, can develop severe COVID-19 and prolonged SARS-CoV-2 shedding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , COVID-19/complications , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Humans , Lung , Male , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 57(4): 1072-1075, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630763

ABSTRACT

Primary ciliary dyskinesis (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with impaired mucociliary clearance caused by defects in ciliary structure and function. The major clinical feature of PCD is recurring or persistent respiratory tract infection. Respiratory tract colonization with drug-resistant organisms impacts the frequency of infections and lung function decline. Protective gear has been employed by caregivers in an attempt to control respiratory tract bacterial spread between patients with cystic fibrosis, but use in PCD is not known. We conducted a web-based survey to investigate infection control and prevention practices of PCD centers in North America, and how practices have been influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic. The response rate was 87.0%. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, glove, gown, and mask use were variable, and only 3.7% of centers used masks during encounters with PCD outpatients. After COVID-19 mandates are lifted, 48.1% of centers plan to continue to use masks during outpatient care, while the practice regarding the use of gloves and gowns was not influenced by the current pandemic. There is no uniform practice for infection control in PCD care indicating the need for practice guidelines. Mitigation of respiratory virus transmission learned during the COVID-19 pandemic may impact future infection control approaches used for patients with PCD and other lung diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ciliary Motility Disorders , Cystic Fibrosis , Kartagener Syndrome , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ciliary Motility Disorders/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Humans , Infection Control , Kartagener Syndrome/complications , Kartagener Syndrome/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care
9.
J Cyst Fibros ; 21(2): e106-e112, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are considered to be a COVID-19 risk group. In March 2020, a fast-track Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) solution was developed to ensure access to CF care without in-person hospital visits. This study investigated the feasibility of urgently replacing in-person appointments with remote monitoring using telephone consultations combined with PROs. We investigated patients and health care professionals' (HCPs) acceptance, recruitment rate, response rate, missing data, and attrition. METHODS: We included adult CF patients from the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark between April and June 2020. Patients filled in a disease-specific questionnaire including relevant clinical aspects, performed home spirometry, and sent in a sputum sample before a scheduled telephone consultation. Twelve participants who completed the questionnaire and had a telephone consultation were interviewed. Three physicians and three nurses from the CF clinical team participated in a focus group interview. RESULTS: Eighty patients were recruited for remote monitoring, and 41 patients filled in at least one questionnaire. Overall, both patients and HCPs found remote monitoring and use of PROs acceptable and useful. Patients experienced greater flexibility and found the questionnaire relevant and understandable but pointed out the need for items regarding mental health status and more adequate information about changes in follow-up and workflow. CONCLUSION: Urgent reorganization of outpatient follow-up among CF patients due to COVID-19 was feasible in routine clinical practice. However, patient involvement should be a future point of attention to ensure a sustainable telehealth PRO solution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Denmark/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Referral and Consultation , Telephone
10.
Respir Med ; 188: 106606, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401832

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this study, we report clinical outcomes in COVID-19 infection in a large cohort of people with cystic fibrosis (pwCF) and compare these outcomes to a propensity score matched cohort of people without CF. METHODS: Analysis of a multicenter research network TriNETX was performed including patients more than 16 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19. Outcomes in COVID-19 positive pwCF were compared with a propensity-matched cohort of people without CF. RESULTS: A total of 507,810 patients with COVID-19 were included (422 patients, 0.08% with CF; 507,388 patients, 99.92% without CF. Mean age at COVID-19 diagnosis in CF cohort was 46.6 ± 19.3 years, with female predominance (n = 225, 53.32%). Majority of the participants were Caucasian (n = 309, 73.22%). In the crude, unmatched analysis, mortality, hospitalization, critical care need, mechanical ventilation, acute kidney injury and composite (combination of intubation and mortality) outcome at 30 days was higher in the pwCF. Following robust propensity matching, pwCF had higher hospitalization rate (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.20-2.04), critical care need (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.13-2.79), and acute renal injury (RR 1.60, 95% CI 1.07-2.39) as compared to patients without CF. CONCLUSION: People with CF are at risk of poor outcomes with COVID-19.5.2% of these patients died within one month of COVID-19 diagnosis, and more than one in 10 patients required critical care. Therefore, the relatively young median age of cystic fibrosis patients, and lower prevalence of obesity do not protect these patients from severe disease contrary to prior reports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Cystic Fibrosis/mortality , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
12.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 56(10): 3435-3437, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320030

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) presenting with a full-blown cytokine storm syndrome probably triggered by infection. This condition is rare and the diagnosis can be particularly difficult in patients with a complex chronic disease such as CF. However, timely recognition and appropriate treatment in the early stages are key to avoiding a potentially fatal course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 121, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes (CFRD) is a frequent comorbidity of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). A worsening of clinical conditions appears before CFRD. It has been demonstrated a decline in pulmonary function and nutritional status also in patients with prediabetes. Few trials show that insulin may be beneficial in prediabetic CF patients, to date guidelines do not recommend for this condition. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a patient treated with insulin glargine at 13 years, due to glycemic intolerance, and with Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor at 15 years. A reduction of pulmonary exacerbations was observed after glargine therapy, also confirmed after the starting of Lumacaftor/ Ivacaftor in this patient. Pulmonary function improved only after the first year of glargine therapy, then a deterioration appeared due to the natural history of CF lung damage. During the COVID-19 lockdown, poor adherence to care contributed to diabetes mellitus onset needing high insulin requirements. After two weeks the patient returned to prediabetic condition and his previous dose of glargine. CONCLUSIONS: our case highlights firstly that insulin glargine has contributed to preserve him from further clinical worsening due to prediabetes in the years before pandemic, secondly the negative impact of COVID-19 lockdown on the clinical course of a chronic disease as CF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin Glargine/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Cystic Fibrosis/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prediabetic State , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 173, 2021 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238716

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and the development of life-threatening COVID-19 are believed to disproportionately affect certain at-risk populations. However, it is not clear whether individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at a higher risk of COVID-19 or its adverse consequences. Recurrent respiratory viral infections are often associated with perturbation and pulmonary exacerbations of CF as evidenced by the significant morbidity observed in CF individuals during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. The primary goal of this review was to systematically survey published accounts of COVID-19 in CF and determine if individuals with CF are disproportionally affected by SARS-CoV-2 and development of COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search using EMBASE and Medline between April 28 and December 10, 2020. Six evaluable studies reporting on a total of 339 individuals with CF who developed COVID-19 were included in this study. RESULTS: We found that although individuals with CF generally experience acute exacerbations of lung disease from infectious agents, COVID-19 incidence estimates in CF appear to be lower than in the general population. However, there are reports of subsets of CF, such as those who had organ transplants, that may experience a more severe COVID-19 course. Potential protective mechanisms in the CF population include pre-pandemic social isolation practices, infection prevention and control knowledge, altered expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and the use of certain medications. CONCLUSIONS: Although individuals with CF are at risk of acute exacerbations often precipitated by respiratory tract viral infections, published evidence to date indicated that individuals with CF do not experience higher risks of contracting SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, there is evidence that some subsets within the CF population, including those post-transplantation, may experience a more severe clinical course. As SARS-CoV-2 variants are identified and the pandemic goes through additional waves of disease outbreaks, ongoing monitoring of the risk of COVID-19 in individuals with CF is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Incidence
15.
J Paediatr Child Health ; 57(10): 1605-1611, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232321

ABSTRACT

AIM: We aimed to investigate sleep disturbances in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and typically developing (TD) children during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Primary care givers of children with CF and PCD aged 3-16 years were asked to enrol in the study. Primary care givers of TD children were included as control group. The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) was used, and questions related to sleep habits during the pandemic were asked. Results of the three groups were compared. RESULTS: Primary care givers of 33 children with CF, 16 children with PCD and 66 TD children were included in the study. There were no differences in terms of age and gender between the three groups. Changes in sleep patterns during the pandemic were more common among TD children and their families, with 75% of the children and 80% of their families sleeping later than before. The sleep initiation and maintenance disorder scores were higher in TD children (P = 0.001), whereas the sleep breathing disorder scores were higher in children with PCD (P = 0.001), and the sleep hyperhidrosis scores were higher in children with CF and PCD (P = 0.011). No relationships were found between sleep parameters and clinical findings of children with lung disease. CONCLUSIONS: Children's sleep habits have changed during the pandemic. Children with chronic lung diseases and even TD children may experience sleep disturbances during this period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ciliary Motility Disorders , Cystic Fibrosis , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
16.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251527, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226898

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the symptoms and clinical course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: We carried out a prospective multicentre cohort study based on 32 CF centres and 6597 patients. Centres were contacted to collect baseline and follow-up data of patients who reported symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 or who had contact with a positive/suspected case between the end of February and July 2020. Symptoms and clinical course of the infection were compared between patients who tested positive by molecular testing (cases) and those who tested negative (controls). RESULTS: Thirty patients were reported from the centres, 16 of them tested positive and 14 tested negative. No differences in symptoms and outcome of the disease were observed between groups. Fever, cough, asthenia and dyspnea were the most frequently reported symptoms. Eight cases (50%) were hospitalized but none required ICU admission. Two adults with a history of lung transplant required non-invasive ventilation, none required ICU admission and all patients fully recovered without short-term sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: The course of SARS-CoV-2 in our patients was relatively favorable. However, COVID-19 should not be considered a mild disease in CF patients, particularly for those with severely impaired respiratory function and organ transplant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Disease Management , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
17.
Purinergic Signal ; 17(3): 399-410, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220524

ABSTRACT

Systemic pools of ATP are elevated in individuals homozygous for cystic fibrosis (CF) as evidenced by elevated blood and plasma ATP levels. This elevated ATP level seems to provide benefit in the presence of advanced solid tumors (Abraham et al., Nature Medicine 2(5):593-596, 1996). We published in this journal a paper showing that IV ATP can elevate the depleted ATP pools of advanced cancer patients up to levels found in CF patients with subsequent clinical, biochemical, and quality of life (QOL) improvements (Rapaport et al., Purinergic Signalling 11(2): 251-262, 2015). We hypothesize that the elevated ATP levels seen in CF patients may be benefiting CF patients in another way: by improving their survival after contracting COVID-19. We discuss here the reasoning behind this hypothesis and suggest how these findings might be applied clinically in the general population.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/metabolism , Cystic Fibrosis/physiopathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 4: CD003424, 2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malabsorption of fat and protein contributes to poor nutritional status in people with cystic fibrosis. Impaired pancreatic function may also result in increased gastric acidity, leading in turn to heartburn, peptic ulcers and the impairment of oral pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. The administration of gastric acid-reducing agents has been used as an adjunct to pancreatic enzyme therapy to improve absorption of fat and gastro-intestinal symptoms in people with cystic fibrosis. It is important to establish the evidence regarding potential benefits of drugs that reduce gastric acidity in people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of drug therapies for reducing gastric acidity for: nutritional status; symptoms associated with increased gastric acidity; fat absorption; lung function; quality of life and survival; and to determine if any adverse effects are associated with their use. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic and non-electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals,  abstract books and conference proceedings. Both authors double checked the reference lists of the searches Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 26 April 2021. On the 26 April 2021 further searches were conducted on the clinicaltrials.gov register to identify any ongoing trials that may be of relevance. The WHO ICTRP database was last searched in 2020 and is not currently available for searching due to the Covid-19 pandemic. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised and quasi-randomised trials involving agents that reduce gastric acidity compared to placebo or a comparator treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Both authors independently selected trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: The searches identified 40 trials; 17 of these, with 273 participants, were suitable for inclusion, but the number of trials assessing each of the different agents was small. Seven trials were limited to children and four trials enrolled only adults. Meta-analysis was not performed, 14 trials were of a cross-over design and we did not have the appropriate information to conduct comprehensive meta-analyses. All the trials were run in single centres and duration ranged from five days to six months. The included trials were generally not reported adequately enough to allow judgements on risk of bias. However, one trial found that drug therapies that reduce gastric acidity improved gastro-intestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain; seven trials reported significant improvement in measures of fat malabsorption; and two trials reported no significant improvement in nutritional status. Only one trial reported measures of respiratory function and one trial reported an adverse effect with prostaglandin E2 analogue misoprostol. No trials have been identified assessing the effectiveness of these agents in improving quality of life, the complications of increased gastric acidity, or survival. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Trials have shown limited evidence that agents that reduce gastric acidity are associated with improvement in gastro-intestinal symptoms and fat absorption. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to indicate whether there is an improvement in nutritional status, lung function, quality of life, or survival. Furthermore, due to the unclear risks of bias in the included trials, we are unable to make firm conclusions based on the evidence reported therein. We therefore recommend that large, multicentre, randomised controlled clinical trials are undertaken to evaluate these interventions.


Subject(s)
Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Gastric Acid/metabolism , Histamine H2 Antagonists/therapeutic use , Proton Pump Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Abdominal Pain/drug therapy , Adult , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/drug therapy , Dietary Fats/pharmacokinetics , Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Intestinal Absorption/drug effects , Pancreas/enzymology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
19.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20(3): e29-e31, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196726

ABSTRACT

The effects of the concomitant infection by COVID-19 and Burkholderia cepacia (Bc) in CF are not known. We describe the case of a 34 years woman with CF, colonized by Bc and found SARS-CoV2 positive. In the first hospital week she suffered acute respiratory failure and chest imaging showed interstitial involvement and multiple thickenings. She was treated with antibiotics, dexamethasone, remdesivir and heparin, with gradual improvement and discharge at day 20th. The reciprocal role of SARS-CoV-2 and Bc, their potential interactions and the contribution of the individual therapies to the favourable outcome are unclear. It is debatable whether it was SARS-CoV2 that triggered a Bc pulmonary exacerbation or if the chronic Bc infection facilitated the development of a COVID-19 more aggressive than usually seen in CF. If the latter hypothesis were confirmed by similar cases, Bc colonization should be regarded as a risk factor for severe COVID-19 expression in CF.


Subject(s)
Burkholderia Infections/complications , Burkholderia Infections/diagnosis , Burkholderia cenocepacia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Adult , Burkholderia Infections/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Humans
20.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20(4): 566-577, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Viral infections can cause significant morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The current Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic could therefore have a serious impact on the health of people with CF (pwCF). METHODS: We used the 38-country European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry (ECFSPR) to collect case data about pwCF and SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Up to 30 June 2020, 16 countries reported 130 SARS-CoV-2 cases in people with CF, yielding an incidence of 2.70/1000 pwCF. Incidence was higher in lung-transplanted patients (n=23) versus non-transplanted patients (n=107) (8.43 versus 2.36 cases/1000). Incidence was higher in pwCF versus the age-matched general population in the age groups <15, 15-24, and 25-49 years (p<0.001), with similar trends for pwCF with and without lung transplant. Compared to the general population, pwCF (regardless of transplantation status) had significantly higher rates of admission to hospital for all age groups with available data, and higher rates of intensive care, although not statistically significant. Most pwCF recovered (96.2%), however 5 died, of whom 3 were lung transplant recipients. The case fatality rate for pwCF (3.85%, 95% CI: 1.26-8.75) was non-significantly lower than that of the general population (7.46%; p=0.133). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection can result in severe illness and death for pwCF, even for younger patients and especially for lung transplant recipients. PwCF should continue to shield from infection and should be prioritized for vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Care , Cystic Fibrosis/mortality , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Lung Transplantation , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL