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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
2.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 49-54, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an uptake of telehealth in cystic fibrosis care. Previous studies show disparities in telehealth use based on socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to: (1) understand telehealth use and perceptions and (2) identify the facilitators and barriers to telehealth use among people with CF and their families (PwCF) from diverse racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of the 2020 Cystic Fibrosis State of Care surveys completed by PwCF (PFSoC), CF Care Programs (SoC1) and the CF Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR). RESULTS: A total of 424 PwCF and 286 programs responded to the PFSoC and SoC1. Among PwCF, 90% self-identified as White, 6% as Hispanic/Latino, and 2% as Black. Racial/ethnic minorities were less likely to have had a telehealth visit (p=.015). This difference was pronounced among the Hispanic/Latino population (p<.01). Telehealth use did not differ by health insurance and was similarly offered independent of financial status. Compared to PwCF who denied financial constraints, those who reported financial difficulties found telehealth more difficult to use (p=.018) and were less likely to think that their concerns (p=.010) or issues that mattered most to them (p=.020) were addressed during telehealth. Programs perceived lack of technology, language barriers, and home conditions as barriers to telehealth in vulnerable populations. CONCLUSION: PFSoC and SoC1 identified differences in telehealth use and care perceptions by ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic characteristics. Further studies are needed to understand how telehealth can change access to CF care in diverse subpopulations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Minority Health , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/ethnology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Financial Stress/ethnology , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Healthcare Disparities/standards , Humans , Minority Health/ethnology , Minority Health/standards , Minority Health/statistics & numerical data , Needs Assessment , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 31-38, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are two to four times more prevalent in people with CF (pwCF) than the general population. COVID-19 may exacerbate mental health challenges, increasing demand for psychological services, while decreasing their availability. We assessed the impact of the pandemic on depression and anxiety in pwCF, including how COVID-19 affected the frequency of mental health screening and the types of services provided. METHODS: A 38-item internet survey, completed in June 2020, assessed how COVID-19 affected: 1) the mental health clinician's role and screening processes; 2) barriers to screening and resource needs; 3) impact of COVID-19 on depression and anxiety, and 4) positive outcomes and confidence in sustaining mental health screening and treatment, including telehealth services, after the pandemic. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 131 of the 289 US CF programs. Overall, 60% of programs (n=79) continued mental health screening and treatment, although less frequently; 50% provided individual tele-mental health interventions, and 9% provided telehealth group therapy. Clinically elevated depression symptoms (PHQ-9≥10; moderate to severe), were found in 12% of 785 pwCF, with 3.1% endorsing suicidal ideation. Similarly, elevated anxiety (moderate to severe; GAD-7≥10) was found in 13% of pwCF (n=779). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic created an opportunity to implement innovative solutions to disruptions in mental health screening and treatment in CF programs. We found that pwCF had increased access to psychological interventions during the pandemic via telehealth, supporting the continued integration of tele-mental health screening and treatment into CF care.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Depression , Mental Health , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Needs Assessment , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
4.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 3-8, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel therapies have dramatically changed cystic fibrosis (CF) and innovative care delivery systems are needed to meet future patient needs. Telehealth has been shown to be an efficient and desirable form of care delivery. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid shift to telehealth, and this presented a unique opportunity to study facilitators, barriers, and satisfaction with this mode of care delivery. We aim to report survey methods, demographics and telehealth use among CF care programs, patients, and families during the pandemic. METHODS: CF programs completed two surveys between July 29 and September 18, 2020, and between April 19 and May 19, 2021. Patients and families completed a similar survey between August 31 and October 30, 2020. The surveys addressed topics assessing the pandemic's financial impact, telehealth modes and experiences, licensure and reimbursement issues, health screening, and remote monitoring. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and were compared to the CF Foundation Patient Registry. RESULTS: Most programs (278 at timepoint one and 274 at timepoint two) provided telehealth during the pandemic. The percent of visits containing either telephone or video components changed from 45% to 25% over the time periods. Additionally, 424 patients and families from various ages and backgrounds responded to the survey and 81% reported having a telehealth visit. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic accelerated telehealth adoption and these datasets are a valuable source for exploring telehealth barriers and facilitators, the quality-of-care experience, financial and workforce implications, the impact on underrepresented populations, and implications for coverage and reimbursement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communication Barriers , Continuity of Patient Care , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 9-13, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs in the United States rapidly adopted telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding factors that promote or impede telehealth will inform planning for future telehealth-enabled care models. METHODS: Adult, pediatric, and affiliate CF care programs in the United States (n = 287) were surveyed twice eight months apart in 2020-2021 about telehealth use. Programs were asked to describe barriers to and promoters of telehealth. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of programs provided telehealth services. In the first CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC1), programs estimated that 57% of patients exclusively received in-person care, 36% of patients received telehealth by phone/computer with video, and 8% of patients received telephone-only care. In the second CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC2), programs estimated that 80% of visits were in-person and 15% were via audio and video telehealth. Pediatric programs (21%) were less likely than adult (37%) or affiliate (41%) programs to recommend telehealth (p = 0.007). All programs ranked lack of internet access as the highest barrier to patient engagement with telehealth. Promoters of telehealth were increased accessibility and avoidance of infection transmission. Top ranked changes to improve telehealth were expanded provision of remote monitoring devices and technology access. Similar proportions of program types anticipated institutional telehealth expansion. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF programs in the United States identified factors to improve future care delivery via telehealth. Targeting specific barriers and promoters will improve the use and quality of telehealth throughout the care center network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Participation , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Needs Assessment , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
6.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 23-28, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic forced cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs to rapidly shift from in-person care delivery to telehealth. Our objective was to provide a qualitative exploration of facilitators and barriers to: 1) implementing high-quality telehealth and 2) navigating reimbursement for telehealth services. METHODS: We used data from the 2020 State of Care CF Program Survey (n=286 U.S. care programs) administered in August-September to identify two cohorts of programs, with variation in telehealth quality (n=12 programs) and reimbursement (n=8 programs). We conducted focus groups and semi-structured interviews with CF program directors and coordinators in December 2020, approximately 9 months from onset of the pandemic. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to identify facilitators and barriers of implementation, and inductive thematic analysis to identify facilitators and barriers of reimbursement. RESULTS: Factors differentiating programs with greater and lower perceived telehealth quality included telehealth characteristics (perceived advantage over in-person care, cost, platform quality); external influences (needs and resources of those served by the CF program), characteristics of the CF program (compatibility with workflows, relative priority, available resources); characteristics of team members (individual stage of change), and processes for implementation (engaging patients and teams). Reimbursement barriers included documentation to optimize billing; reimbursement of multi-disciplinary team members, remote monitoring, and telephone-only telehealth; and lower volume of patients. CONCLUSIONS: A number of factors are associated with successful implementation and reimbursement of telehealth. Future efforts should provide guidance and incentives that support telehealth delivery and infrastructure, share best practices across CF programs, and remove barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Participation , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Needs Assessment , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality Improvement , Reimbursement Mechanisms , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20(3): e23-e28, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155520

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a chronic multi-system disease best cared for at Care centers with routine monitoring by interdisciplinary teams. Previously, remote home monitoring technology has been explored to augment in-person care. During the COVID-19 pandemic, traditional in-person care was limited and CF centers rapidly adapted to a telehealth delivery model. The purpose of this study was to understand how people with CF (PwCF) and families of PwCF experienced the shift to telehealthcare delivery. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey-based study conducted in 11 CF Centers. Two surveys were designed (one for adult PwCF and one for parents/guardians of PwCF) by participating CF center members with patient and family partner input. Surveys were disseminated electronically via email/text to all patients who completed a telehealth visit, and data were collected on secure Google Forms. RESULTS: Respondents rated their telehealth experiences as positive. Most were highly satisfied with their telehealth visit (77% adult, 72% pediatric) and found the visits to be highly convenient (85% for all surveyed). A majority of patients reported they had adequate time during the visit and had all questions and concerns addressed. Importantly, we also identified concerns regarding lack of in-person assessments including pulmonary function testing (PFT) and throat/sputum culture. CONCLUSION: Telehealth was a feasible and well-accepted mechanism for delivering care in a chronic CF care model during the COVID-19 pandemic and may be useful in the post-pandemic era. Further work is needed to understand the impact of telehealth on patient outcomes, healthcare utilization and associated cost.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Family/psychology , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
9.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20(2): 198-204, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hundreds of papers have been published on the COVID-19 pandemic, and several of them on psychological themes connected with it, but very little is so far known on how adult patients with Cystic Fibrosis (pwCFs) are coping with this dramatic event. METHODS: An online questionnaire was developed according to the Italian validated COVID-19 Peritraumatic Distress Index (CPDI) and addressed to the general population (GP). A similar questionnaire, augmented with CF specific questions, targeted pwCFs. The two web-based surveys were accessible for some weeks during the lockdown mandated by the Italian government. RESULTS: The CF questionnaire was completed by 712 adult pwCFs (422 females), matched for sex and age with a 1/5 ratio to GP questionnaire respondents. Mild or medium distress affected 40.2% of pwCFs and 43.9% of GP controls, severe distress 5.3% of pwCFs and 6.2% of GP controls. The level of psychological distress was not correlated with the degree of pulmonary function impairment. When symptoms of anxiety and depression, and physical manifestations were independently analyzed, the control group featured a 55% higher level of mild-moderate anxiety symptoms. Signs of psychological distress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and physical manifestations were significantly more frequent in female pwCFs compared to males, similarly to GP. CONCLUSION: Adult pwCFs seem to have equal, and in some domains, lower levels of psychological distress than GP controls. This might be sustained by lifelong experiences in coping with the demands of their chronic disease. These results may orient future psychological interventions.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Psychological Distress , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Case-Control Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 26(6): 696-701, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-780547

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current review provides an overview of key psychological issues and challenges for the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulator era of care. It discusses research from diagnosis and beyond, to patient-team communication with a particular focus on medical trials, adherence and living with CFTR modulators. RECENT FINDINGS: The impact of the diagnosis on parents is immense and the complexity of treatment now and in the future, are a challenge for both parents and teams. Communicating digitally is starting to become daily practice for many in CF care, with coronavirus disease 2019 accelerating this process. Participating in trials has a psychological impact, but most of all the (delayed) access and timing of accessing CFTR modulators is an important theme. Adherence remains of significance, both to 'old' and 'new' treatments. Living with CF in the era of CFTR modulators is beginning to impact on patients' quality of life, including new possibilities, opportunities and challenges. SUMMARY: Psychological care needs to engage and keep pace with the rapid medical changes. Some care priorities remain the same, including psychological screening and assessment, as well as psychoeducation, communication training and psychotherapy. The presence of CF psychologist in the CF clinic remains as important as ever.


Subject(s)
Communication , Coronavirus Infections , Cystic Fibrosis/drug therapy , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Medication Adherence , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator/genetics , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 55(12): 3579-3586, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aim to assess the anxiety and depressive symptoms related to the COVID-19 pandemic in children with chronic lung disease and their parents and also to evaluate parents' coping strategies. METHODS: Parents of children aged 4-18 years, with chronic lung disease (study group n = 113) and healthy control (n = 108) were enrolled in the study. General Health Questionnaire-12, specific COVID-19 related anxiety questions, The Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced inventory, coronavirus-related psychiatric symptom scale in children-parental form were used to analyze the psychiatric effects of COVID-19. Parents were also asked about how online education affected their family life and children. All data were compared between children/parents in the study and control groups. Risk factors related with anxiety scores of children were also analyzed. RESULTS: Talking about the pandemic, concern about coronavirus transmission, taking precaution to prevent coronavirus transmission, making pressure to protect from COVID-19 were significantly higher in parents within the study group (p < .05). Parents in the study group used more problem-focused coping than parents in the control group (p = .003). Anxiety symptoms score was higher in children of the study group (p = .007). Parents in the study group found online education more useful than parents in the control group. CONCLUSION: Children with chronic lung diseases and their parents have more anxiety due to COVID-19 pandemic and these parents use more mature coping strategies to manage the stress of the pandemic. Longitudinal and larger studies should be done in all aspects of online education in children with chronic lung diseases.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Ciliary Motility Disorders/psychology , Coronavirus Infections , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/psychology , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Ciliary Motility Disorders/physiopathology , Cystic Fibrosis/physiopathology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Cyst Fibros ; 19(6): 880-887, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), despite being considered a high-risk group. This study explored the early impact of COVID-19 on the emotional well-being of patients and self-reported changes in their home therapy since the start of the pandemic. METHODS: Adult patients with CF, lung-transplanted (LTX) CF patients and parents of children with CF completed an online questionnaire, securely linked to their medical files. The questionnaire covered the emotional impact of the pandemic, changes in CF and LTX treatment, changes in health-protecting behaviours and CF-related concerns, and their perception of their COVID-19 status. RESULTS: The response rate was 63% (80 CF, 66 LTX and 73 parents). A wide range of illness severity was included. None of the respondents had contracted COVID-19 and all strictly followed the social distancing rules. There was evident psychological impact, with many reporting increased stress, fear and worry about CF and the future. Changes in treatment were positive, including more physiotherapy for adults and better-quality nebulizing. Changes in routine were reported, such as different treatment timing. Adult patients and parents had cancelled their CF appointments more often since the start of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The initial psychological impact of COVID-19 was evident. The impact on home treatment was reassuringly small. Psychological care is needed for patients suffering prolonged psychological impact, and CF teams need to contextualize the information that patients and parents receive from the media and support them to balance the perceived risk with true risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cystic Fibrosis , Home Care Services , Parents/psychology , Psychological Distress , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/surgery , Female , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Lung Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Pediatr Pulmonol ; 55(8): 2128-2134, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate anxiety among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their mothers related to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A total of 45 patients with CF and their mothers were enrolled in the study together with 90 age-matched healthy children and their mothers as a control group. The State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered by teleconference with children aged 13 to 18 years old and their mothers. The STAI for children was administered with children aged 9 to 12 years. Results were compared with age-matched healthy children and their mothers. The relationship between anxiety scores of children with CF and their mothers was evaluated by comparing with clinical data of children with CF. At the conclusion of the teleconference, mothers were asked whether their anxiety had changed as a result of the interview. RESULTS: It was found that healthy children aged 13 to 18 years had higher state anxiety scores than age-matched children with CF. Mothers of children with CF had higher trait anxiety scores, especially those of children aged 0 to 12 years, than mothers of healthy children (P < .05). For mothers of children with CF, state anxiety scores were higher among those whose children had chronic Pseudomonas infection (P < .05). Most mothers of children with CF stated that their anxiety decreased following the interview. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic may increase anxiety among mothers of children with CF as well those with healthy children. However, COVID-19 had no effect on the anxiety of children with CF. Informing parents of children with CF about COVID-19 by teleconference may decrease anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/complications , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Mothers , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adolescent , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Depression , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Pseudomonas Infections/complications , Pseudomonas Infections/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications
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