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1.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(5): 1347-1355, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557643

ABSTRACT

The natural pathway of antioxidant production is mediated through Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with Cap and collar homology [ECH]-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) system. Keap1 maintains a low level of Nrf2 by holding it in its protein complex. Also, Keap1 facilitates the degradation of Nrf2 by ubiquitination. In other words, Keap1 is a down-regulator of Nrf2. To boost the production of biological antioxidants, Keap1 has to be inhibited and Nrf2 has to be released. Liberated Nrf2 is in an unbound state, so it travels to the nucleus to stimulate the antioxidant response element (ARE) present on the antioxidant genes. AREs activate biosynthesis of biological antioxidants through genes responsible for the production of antioxidants. In some cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there is an enormous release of cytokines. The antioxidant defense mechanism in the body helps in counteracting symptoms induced by the cytokine storm in COVID-19. So, boosting the production of antioxidants is highly desirable in such a condition. In this review article, we have compiled the role of Keap1-Nrf2 system in antioxidant production. We further propose its potential therapeutic use in managing cytokine storm in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Animals , Antioxidants/metabolism , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Disease Management , Humans , Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/agonists , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/physiology
2.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 394(12): 2471-2474, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473989

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiological process of the disease, Covid-19, is mediated by innate immunity, with the presence of macrophages responsible for secreting type 1 and 6 interleukins (IL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leading to dilation of endothelial cells with a consequent increase in capillary permeability. The treatment of this disease has been much discussed, but the variability in the clinical picture, the difficulties for diagnosis and treatment, especially of those patients who have the most severe clinical condition of the disease. Immunization is an effective tool for controlling the spread and overload of health services, but its effectiveness involves high investments in the acquisition of inputs, development of vaccines, and logistics of storage and distribution. These factors can be obstacles for countries with lower economic, technological, and infrastructure indexes. Reflecting on these difficulties, we raised the possibility of adjuvant therapies with imminent research feasibility, as is the case with the use of carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol whose has biological properties that serve as a barrier to processes mediated by free radicals, such as irritation and inflammation, due to its antioxidant action. Many authors highlighted the activity of carvacrol as a potent suppressor of COX-2 expression minimizing the acute inflammatory process, decreasing the release of some pro-inflammatory mediators such as IL-1ß, TNF-α, PGE2. Anyway, the benefits of carvacrol are numerous and the therapeutic possibilities too. With this description, the question arises: would carvacrol be a supporting treatment option, effective in minimizing the deleterious effects of Covid-19? There is still a lot to discover and research.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cymenes/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cymenes/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470887

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected >235 million people and killed over 4.8 million individuals worldwide. Although vaccines have been developed for prophylactic management, there are no clinically proven antivirals to treat the viral infection. Continuous efforts are being made all over the world to develop effective drugs but these are being delayed by periodic outbreak of mutated SARS-CoV-2 and a lack of knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis and post-infection complications. In this regard, the involvement of Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a lipid-raft related phospholipid-binding protein, in SARS-CoV-2 attachment, internalization, and replication has been discussed. In addition to the evidence from published literature, we have performed in silico docking of viral spike glycoprotein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with human AnxA2 to find the molecular interactions. Overall, this review provides the molecular insights into a potential role of AnxA2 in the SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and post-infection complications, especially thrombosis, cytokine storm, and insulin resistance.


Subject(s)
Annexin A2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Annexin A2/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , Virus Internalization
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 347, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437669

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 mutations contribute to increased viral transmissibility and immune escape, compromising the effectiveness of existing vaccines and neutralizing antibodies. An in-depth investigation on COVID-19 pathogenesis is urgently needed to develop a strategy against SARS-CoV-2 variants. Here, we identified CD147 as a universal receptor for SARS-CoV-2 and its variants. Meanwhile, Meplazeumab, a humanized anti-CD147 antibody, could block cellular entry of SARS-CoV-2 and its variants-alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, with inhibition rates of 68.7, 75.7, 52.1, 52.1, and 62.3% at 60 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, humanized CD147 transgenic mice were susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and its two variants, alpha and beta. When infected, these mice developed exudative alveolar pneumonia, featured by immune responses involving alveoli-infiltrated macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes and activation of IL-17 signaling pathway. Mechanistically, we proposed that severe COVID-19-related cytokine storm is induced by a "spike protein-CD147-CyPA signaling axis": Infection of SARS-CoV-2 through CD147 initiated the JAK-STAT pathway, which further induced expression of cyclophilin A (CyPA); CyPA reciprocally bound to CD147 and triggered MAPK pathway. Consequently, the MAPK pathway regulated the expression of cytokines and chemokines, which promoted the development of cytokine storm. Importantly, Meplazumab could effectively inhibit viral entry and inflammation caused by SARS-CoV-2 and its variants. Therefore, our findings provided a new perspective for severe COVID-19-related pathogenesis. Furthermore, the validated universal receptor for SARS-CoV-2 and its variants can be targeted for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Basigin/antagonists & inhibitors , Basigin/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Basigin/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , MAP Kinase Signaling System/genetics , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
5.
Trends Endocrinol Metab ; 32(11): 875-889, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401891

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 encodes the structural proteins spike (S), envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N). The receptor-binding domain on the surface subunit S1 is responsible for attachment of the virus to angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is highly expressed in host cells. The cytokine storm observed in patients with COVID-19 contributes to the endothelial vascular dysfunction, which can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiorgan failure, alteration in iron homeostasis, and death. Growth and differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), which belongs to the transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß) superfamily of proteins, has a pivotal role in the development and progression of diseases because of its role as a metabolic regulator. In COVID-19, GDF15 activity increases in response to tissue damage. GDF15 appears to be a strong predictor of poor outcomes in patients critically ill with COVID-19 and acts as an 'inflammation-induced central mediator of tissue tolerance' via its metabolic properties. In this review, we examine the potential properties of GDF15 as an emerging modulator of immunity in COVID-19 in association with iron metabolism. The virus life cycle in host cell provides potential targets for drug therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Growth Differentiation Factor 15/immunology , Iron/metabolism , Apoptosis/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors/immunology , Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptors/metabolism , Growth Differentiation Factor 15/metabolism , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Oxidative Stress/immunology , Prognosis , Pyroptosis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 705080, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389187

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viral infections have been a long-standing global burden ranging from seasonal recurrences to the unexpected pandemics. The yearly hospitalizations from seasonal viruses such as influenza can fluctuate greatly depending on the circulating strain(s) and the congruency with the predicted strains used for the yearly vaccine formulation, which often are not predicted accurately. While antiviral agents are available against influenza, efficacy is limited due to a temporal disconnect between the time of infection and symptom development and viral resistance. Uncontrolled, influenza infections can lead to a severe inflammatory response initiated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or host-derived danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that ultimately signal through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Overall, these pathogen-host interactions result in a local cytokine storm leading to acute lung injury (ALI) or the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with concomitant systemic involvement and more severe, life threatening consequences. In addition to traditional antiviral treatments, blocking the host's innate immune response may provide a more viable approach to combat these infectious pathogens. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic illustrates a critical need for novel treatments to counteract the ALI and ARDS that has caused the deaths of millions worldwide. This review will examine how antagonizing TLR4 signaling has been effective experimentally in ameliorating ALI and lethal infection in challenge models triggered not only by influenza, but also by other ALI-inducing viruses.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/prevention & control , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Humans , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
8.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(5): 1347-1355, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349298

ABSTRACT

The natural pathway of antioxidant production is mediated through Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with Cap and collar homology [ECH]-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) system. Keap1 maintains a low level of Nrf2 by holding it in its protein complex. Also, Keap1 facilitates the degradation of Nrf2 by ubiquitination. In other words, Keap1 is a down-regulator of Nrf2. To boost the production of biological antioxidants, Keap1 has to be inhibited and Nrf2 has to be released. Liberated Nrf2 is in an unbound state, so it travels to the nucleus to stimulate the antioxidant response element (ARE) present on the antioxidant genes. AREs activate biosynthesis of biological antioxidants through genes responsible for the production of antioxidants. In some cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there is an enormous release of cytokines. The antioxidant defense mechanism in the body helps in counteracting symptoms induced by the cytokine storm in COVID-19. So, boosting the production of antioxidants is highly desirable in such a condition. In this review article, we have compiled the role of Keap1-Nrf2 system in antioxidant production. We further propose its potential therapeutic use in managing cytokine storm in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Animals , Antioxidants/metabolism , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Disease Management , Humans , Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/agonists , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/physiology
9.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 99: 108049, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347666

ABSTRACT

Setting up treatment strategies is the highest concern today to reduce the fatality of COVID-19. Due to a very new kind of virus attack, no specific treatment has been discovered to date. The most crucial way to dominate the disease severity is now the repurposing of drugs. In this review, we focused on the current treatment approaches targeting the crucial causative factors for the disease burden through cytokine storm or cytokine release syndrome. Several vaccines have been developed and have been applied already for prevention purposes, and several are on the way to be developed, although the effects and side effects are under observation. Presently, regulation of the immune response through intervention treatment methods has been adjusted on the basis of the COVID-19 severity stage and generally includes vaccines, immunotherapies including convalescent plasma and immunoglobulin treatment, monoclonal antibodies, cytokine therapy, complement inhibition, regenerative medicine, and repurposed anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory drugs. Combination therapy is not acceptable in all respects because there is no concrete evidence in clinical trials or in vivo data. Target-specific drug therapies, such as inhibition of cytokine-producing signaling pathways, could be an excellent solution and thus reduce the severity of inflammation and disease severity. Therefore, gathering information about the mechanism of disease progression, possible goals, and drug efficacy of immune-based approaches to combat COVID-19 in the context of orderly review analysis is consequential.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Drug Repositioning , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335102

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients may present as asymptomatic or demonstrate mild to severe and life-threatening symptoms. Although COVID-19 has a respiratory focus, there are major cardiovascular complications (CVCs) associated with infection. The reported CVCs include myocarditis, heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolism and blood pressure abnormalities. These occur, in part, because of dysregulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) and Kinin-Kallikrein System (KKS). A major route by which SARS-CoV-2 gains cellular entry is via the docking of the viral spike (S) protein to the membrane-bound angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The roles of ACE2 within the cardiovascular and immune systems are vital to ensure homeostasis. The key routes for the development of CVCs and the recently described long COVID have been hypothesised as the direct consequences of the viral S protein/ACE2 axis, downregulation of ACE2 and the resulting damage inflicted by the immune response. Here, we review the impact of COVID-19 on the cardiovascular system, the mechanisms by which dysregulation of the RAAS and KKS can occur following virus infection and the future implications for pharmacological therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Kallikrein-Kinin System , Renin-Angiotensin System , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Bradykinin/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325687

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported in Wuhan, China, in late December 2019. Since then, COVID-19 has spread rapidly worldwide and was declared a global pandemic on 20 March 2020. Cardiovascular complications are rapidly emerging as a major peril in COVID-19 in addition to respiratory disease. The mechanisms underlying the excessive effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on patients with cardiovascular comorbidities remain only partly understood. SARS-CoV-2 infection is caused by binding of the viral surface spike (S) protein to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), followed by the activation of the S protein by transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). ACE2 is expressed in the lung (mainly in type II alveolar cells), heart, blood vessels, small intestine, etc., and appears to be the predominant portal to the cellular entry of the virus. Based on current information, most people infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus have a good prognosis, while a few patients reach critical condition, especially the elderly and those with chronic underlying diseases. The "cytokine storm" observed in patients with severe COVID-19 contributes to the destruction of the endothelium, leading to "acute respiratory distress syndrome" (ARDS), multiorgan failure, and death. At the origin of the general proinflammatory state may be the SARS-CoV-2-mediated redox status in endothelial cells via the upregulation of ACE/Ang II/AT1 receptors pathway or the increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) production. Furthermore, this vicious circle between oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation induces endothelial dysfunction, endothelial senescence, high risk of thrombosis and coagulopathy. The microvascular dysfunction and the formation of microthrombi in a way differentiate the SARS-CoV-2 infection from the other respiratory diseases and bring it closer to cardiovascular diseases like myocardial infarction and stroke. Due the role played by OS in the evolution of viral infection and in the development of COVID-19 complications, the use of antioxidants as adjuvant therapy seems appropriate in this new pathology. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) could be a promising candidate that, through its wide tissue distribution and versatile antioxidant properties, interferes with several signaling pathways. Thus, ALA improves endothelial function by restoring the endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and presents an anti-inflammatory effect dependent or independent of its antioxidant properties. By improving mitochondrial function, it can sustain the tissues' homeostasis in critical situation and by enhancing the reduced glutathione it could indirectly strengthen the immune system. This complex analysis could open a new therapeutic perspective for ALA in COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Thioctic Acid/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antioxidants/chemistry , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Thioctic Acid/chemistry
12.
Islets ; 13(3-4): 66-79, 2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310869

ABSTRACT

The link between COVID-19 infection and diabetes has been explored in several studies since the start of the pandemic, with associations between comorbid diabetes and poorer prognosis in patients infected with the virus and reports of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring with COVID-19 infection. As such, significant interest has been generated surrounding mechanisms by which the virus may exert effects on the pancreatic ß cells. In this review, we consider possible routes by which SARS-CoV-2 may impact ß cells. Specifically, we outline data that either support or argue against the idea of direct infection and injury of ß cells by SARS-CoV-2. We also discuss ß cell damage due to a "bystander" effect in which infection with the virus leads to damage to surrounding tissues that are essential for ß cell survival and function, such as the pancreatic microvasculature and exocrine tissue. Studies elucidating the provocation of a cytokine storm following COVID-19 infection and potential impacts of systemic inflammation and increases in insulin resistance on ß cells are also reviewed. Finally, we summarize the existing clinical data surrounding diabetes incidence since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Insulin-Secreting Cells/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Bystander Effect/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Insulin Resistance/physiology , Insulin-Secreting Cells/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
Chem Biol Interact ; 344: 109501, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309181

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 stimulates significant efforts and approaches to understand its global spread. Although the recent introduction of the vaccine is a crucial prophylactic step, the effective treatment for SARS-CoV-2 is still undiscovered. An in-depth analysis of symptoms and clinical parameters, as well as molecular changes, is necessary to comprehend COVID-19 and propose a remedy for affected people to fight that disease. The analysis of available clinical data and SARS-CoV-2 infection markers underlined the main pathogenic process in COVID-19 is cytokine storm and inflammation. That led us to suggest that the most important pathogenic feature of SARS-CoV-2 leading to COVID-19 is oxidative stress and cellular damage stimulated by iron, a source of Fenton reaction and its product hydroxyl radical (•OH), the most reactive ROS with t1/2-10-9s. Therefore we suggest some scavenging agents are a reasonable choice for overcoming its toxic effect and can be regarded as a treatment for the disease on the molecular level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Hydroxyl Radical/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Iron/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
15.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(10): 5090-5111, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303372

ABSTRACT

The virus "acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2" (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiologic agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), initially responsible for an outbreak of pneumonia in Wuhan, China, which, due to the high level of contagion and dissemination, has become a pandemic. The clinical picture varies from mild to critical cases; however, all of these signs already show neurological problems, from sensory loss to neurological diseases. Thus, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) infected with the new coronavirus are more likely to develop severe conditions; in addition to worsening the disease, this is due to the high level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which is closely associated with increased mortality both in COVID-19 and MS. This increase is uncontrolled and exaggerated, characterizing the cytokine storm, so a possible therapy for this neuronal inflammation is the modulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, since acetylcholine (ACh) acts to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and acts directly on the brain for being released by cholinergic neurons, as well as acting on other cells such as immune and blood cells. In addition, due to tissue damage, there is an exacerbated release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), potentiating the inflammatory process and activating purinergic receptors which act directly on neuroinflammation and positively modulate the inflammatory cycle. Associated with this, in neurological pathologies, there is greater expression of P2X7 in the cells of the microglia, which positively activates the immune inflammatory response. Thus, the administration of blockers of this receptor can act in conjunction with the action of ACh in the anticholinergic inflammatory pathway. Finally, there will be a reduction in the cytokine storm and triggered hyperinflammation, as well as the level of mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis infected with SARS-CoV-2 and the development of possible neurological damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Multiple Sclerosis/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Microglia/metabolism , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy
16.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(4): 1017-1031, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286160

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-COV-2) is the culprit of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), which has infected approximately 173 million people and killed more than 3.73 million. At risk groups including diabetic and obese patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19-related complications and poor outcomes. Substantial evidence points to hypovitaminosis D as a risk factor for severe disease, the need for ICU, and mortality. 1,25(OH)D, a key regulator of calcium homeostasis, is believed to have various immune-regulatory roles including; promoting anti-inflammatory cytokines, down regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, dampening entry and replication of SARS-COV-2, and the production of antimicrobial peptides. In addition, there are strong connections which suggest that dysregulated 1,25(OH)D levels play a mechanistic and pathophysiologic role in several disease processes that are shared with COVID-19 including: diabetes, obesity, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), cytokine storm, and even hypercoagulable states. With evidence continuing to grow for the case that low vitamin D status is a risk factor for COVID-19 disease and poor outcomes, there is a need now to address the public health efforts set in place to minimize infection, such as lock down orders, which may have inadvertently increased hypovitaminosis D in the general population and those already at risk (elderly, obese, and disabled). Moreover, there is a need to address the implications of this evidence and how we may apply the use of cheaply available supplementation, which has yet to overcome the near global concern of hypovitaminosis D. In our review, we exhaustively scope these shared pathophysiologic connections between COVID-19 and hypovitaminosis D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Thrombophilia/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Vitamin D/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/physiopathology , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/physiopathology , Risk Factors , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/physiopathology , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology
17.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 61: 2-15, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275255

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), exhibits a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from asymptomatic cases to severe pneumonia or even death. In severe COVID-19 cases, an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines has been observed in the bloodstream, forming the so-called "cytokine storm". Generally, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation intensely induces cytokine production as an inflammatory response to viral infection. Therefore, the NLRP3 inflammasome can be a potential target for the treatment of COVID-19. Hence, this review first introduces the canonical NLRP3 inflammasome activation pathway. Second, we review the cellular/molecular mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation by SARS-CoV-2 infection (e.g., viroporins, ion flux and the complement cascade). Furthermore, we describe the involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 (e.g., cytokine storm, respiratory manifestations, cardiovascular comorbidity and neurological symptoms). Finally, we also propose several promising inhibitors targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome, cytokine products and neutrophils to provide novel therapeutic strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects
18.
Genes Immun ; 22(3): 141-160, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275909

ABSTRACT

When surveying the current literature on COVID-19, the "cytokine storm" is considered to be pathogenetically involved in its severe outcomes such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and eventually multiple organ failure. In this review, the similar role of DAMPs is addressed, that is, of those molecules, which operate upstream of the inflammatory pathway by activating those cells, which ultimately release the cytokines. Given the still limited reports on their role in COVID-19, the emerging topic is extended to respiratory viral infections with focus on influenza. At first, a brief introduction is given on the function of various classes of activating DAMPs and counterbalancing suppressing DAMPs (SAMPs) in initiating controlled inflammation-promoting and inflammation-resolving defense responses upon infectious and sterile insults. It is stressed that the excessive emission of DAMPs upon severe injury uncovers their fateful property in triggering dysregulated life-threatening hyperinflammatory responses. Such a scenario may happen when the viral load is too high, for example, in the respiratory tract, "forcing" many virus-infected host cells to decide to commit "suicidal" regulated cell death (e.g., necroptosis, pyroptosis) associated with release of large amounts of DAMPs: an important topic of this review. Ironically, although the aim of this "suicidal" cell death is to save and restore organismal homeostasis, the intrinsic release of excessive amounts of DAMPs leads to those dysregulated hyperinflammatory responses-as typically involved in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in respiratory viral infections. Consequently, as briefly outlined in this review, these molecules can be considered valuable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to monitor and evaluate the course of the viral disorder, in particular, to grasp the eventual transition precociously from a controlled defense response as observed in mild/moderate cases to a dysregulated life-threatening hyperinflammatory response as seen, for example, in severe/fatal COVID-19. Moreover, the pathogenetic involvement of these molecules qualifies them as relevant future therapeutic targets to prevent severe/ fatal outcomes. Finally, a theory is presented proposing that the superimposition of coronavirus-induced DAMPs with non-virus-induced DAMPs from other origins such as air pollution or high age may contribute to severe and fatal courses of coronavirus pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Alarmins/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Models, Immunological , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/complications , Virus Diseases/metabolism
20.
Mar Drugs ; 19(5)2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256603

ABSTRACT

Background: Echinochrome A (EchA) is a pigment from sea urchins. EchA is a polyhydroxylated 1,4-naphthoquinone that contains several hydroxyl groups appropriate for free-radical scavenging and preventing redox imbalance. EchA is the most studied molecule of this family and is an active principle approved to be used in humans, usually for cardiopathies and glaucoma. EchA is used as a pharmaceutical drug. Methods: A comprehensive literature and patent search review was undertaken using PubMed, as well as Google Scholar and Espacenet search engines to review these areas. Conclusions: In the bloodstream, EchA can mediate cellular responses, act as a radical scavenger, and activate the glutathione pathway. It decreases ROS imbalance, prevents and limits lipid peroxidation, and enhances mitochondrial functions. Most importantly, EchA contributes to the modulation of the immune system. EchA can regulate the generation of regulatory T cells, inhibit pro-inflammatory IL-1ß and IL-6 cytokine production, while slightly reducing IL-8, TNF-α, INF-α, and NKT, thus correcting immune imbalance. These characteristics suggest that EchA is a candidate drug to alleviate the cytokine storm syndrome (CSS).


Subject(s)
Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Naphthoquinones/pharmacology , Naphthoquinones/therapeutic use , Pigments, Biological/pharmacology , Pigments, Biological/therapeutic use , Sea Urchins/chemistry , Animals , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
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