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1.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(4): 331-337, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: According to the World Health Organization, Mexico presents one of the highest mortality rates due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The "cytokine storm" phenomenon has been proposed as a pathological hallmark of severe COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of serum cytokine levels with COVID-19 severity. METHODS: We studied the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and the IFN-γ serum levels through flow cytometry in 56 COVID-19 patients (24 critical and 32 non-critical) from Northwest Mexico. RESULTS: We observed a significant increase in the IL-6 and the IL-10 levels in the sera of critical patients. These cytokines were also associated with mechanical ventilation necessity and death, IL-6 showing AUC values above 0.7 for both variables; and correlated with Na+, creatinine, and platelet levels. On the other hand, no association was found between IL-2, IL-4, TNF-α, and IFN-γ with tested variables. CONCLUSION: Our results corroborate previous observations regarding IL-6 and IL-10 involvement in the severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Mexico , Patient Acuity
2.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2221, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575100

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus infection is known as Covid-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). This disease can be asymptomatic or can affect multiple organ systems. Damage induced by the virus is related to dysfunctional activity of the immune system, but the activity of molecules such as C-reactive protein (CRP) as a factor capable of inducing an inflammatory status that may be involved in the severe evolution of the disease, has not been extensively evaluated. A systematic review was performed using the NCBI-PubMed database to find articles related to Covid-19 immunity, inflammatory response, and CRP published from December 2019 to December 2020. High levels of CRP were found in patients with severe evolution of Covid-19 in which several organ systems were affected and in patients who died. CRP activates complement, induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induces apoptosis which, together with the inflammatory status during the disease, can lead to a severe outcome. Several drugs can decrease the level or block the effect of CRP and might be useful in the treatment of Covid-19. From this review it is reasonable to conclude that CRP is a factor that can contribute to severe evolution of Covid-19 and that the use of drugs able to lower CRP levels or block its activity should be evaluated in randomized controlled clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , ADAM17 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/genetics , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Celecoxib/therapeutic use , Complement System Proteins/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Progression , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
3.
Life Sci ; 284: 119201, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm is the exaggerated immune response often observed in viral infections. It is also intimately linked with the progression of COVID-19 disease as well as associated complications and mortality. Therefore, targeting the cytokine storm might help in reducing COVID-19-associated health complications. The number of COVID-19 associated deaths (as of January 15, 2021; https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/) in the USA is high (1199/million) as compared to countries like India (110/million). Although the reason behind this is not clear, spices may have some role in explaining this difference. Spices and herbs are used in different traditional medicines, especially in countries such as India to treat various chronic diseases due to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. AIM: To evaluate the literature available on the anti-inflammatory properties of spices which might prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. METHOD: A detailed literature search has been conducted on PubMed for collecting information pertaining to the COVID-19; the history, origin, key structural features, and mechanism of infection of SARS-CoV-2; the repurposed drugs in use for the management of COVID-19, and the anti-inflammatory role of spices to combat COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. KEY FINDINGS: The literature search resulted in numerous in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials that have reported the potency of spices to exert anti-inflammatory effects by regulating crucial molecular targets for inflammation. SIGNIFICANCE: As spices are derived from Mother Nature and are inexpensive, they are relatively safer to consume. Therefore, their anti-inflammatory property can be exploited to combat the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. This review thus focuses on the current knowledge on the role of spices for the treatment of COVID-19 through suppression of inflammation-linked cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Spices , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6519-6524, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544297

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, which has ravaged our world for more than a year, still shapes our agenda with a scale of intensity that fluctuates over time. In our study, we aimed to determine the correlation between serum migration inhibitory factor (MIF) level and disease severity in COVID-19 with different prognoses. Between 15 October 2020 and 20 January 2021, 110 patients over the age of 18 who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and 40 volunteer healthcare personnel were included in our study. MIF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the comparison of serum MIF values in the patient and control group, it was observed that the MIF level was significantly higher in patients with both moderate and severe COVID-19 levels compared to the control group (p = 0.001, 0.001). In the comparison of serum MIF values of moderate to severe COVID-19 patients, it was observed that MIF level was higher in severe patients (p = 0.001). In the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis performed to differentiate between severe and moderate COVID-19 patients with MIF levels, the area under the curve was observed as 0.78. When the cutoff value of the MIF level was taken as 4.455 ng/ml, the sensitivity was 83% and the specificity was 62%. Failure to adequately balance the pro-inflammatory cytokines synthesized in COVID-19 with anti-inflammatory effect is the most important reason for the aggravation of the disease course. Playing a role in pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis, MIF can provide important information about the disease prognosis in the early period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Intramolecular Oxidoreductases/blood , Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors/blood , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disease Progression , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Clin Microbiol Rev ; 34(3)2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501524

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a rapidly evolving pandemic worldwide with at least 68 million COVID-19-positive cases and a mortality rate of about 2.2%, as of 10 December 2020. About 20% of COVID-19 patients exhibit moderate to severe symptoms. Severe COVID-19 manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with elevated plasma proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1ß (IL-1ß), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10/IP10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), with low levels of interferon type I (IFN-I) in the early stage and elevated levels of IFN-I during the advanced stage of COVID-19. Most of the severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients have had preexisting comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases. These conditions are known to perturb the levels of cytokines, chemokines, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), an essential receptor involved in SARS-CoV-2 entry into the host cells. ACE2 downregulation during SARS-CoV-2 infection activates the angiotensin II/angiotensin receptor (AT1R)-mediated hypercytokinemia and hyperinflammatory syndrome. However, several SARS-CoV-2 proteins, including open reading frame 3b (ORF3b), ORF6, ORF7, ORF8, and the nucleocapsid (N) protein, can inhibit IFN type I and II (IFN-I and -II) production. Thus, hyperinflammation, in combination with the lack of IFN responses against SARS-CoV-2 early on during infection, makes the patients succumb rapidly to COVID-19. Therefore, therapeutic approaches involving anti-cytokine/anti-cytokine-signaling and IFN therapy would favor the disease prognosis in COVID-19. This review describes critical host and viral factors underpinning the inflammatory "cytokine storm" induction and IFN antagonism during COVID-19 pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches to reduce hyperinflammation and their limitations are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Interferon Type I/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunization, Passive/methods , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 742941, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477827

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) elicited by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused devastating health, economic and social impact worldwide. Its clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic to respiratory failure and multi-organ failure or death. The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is attributed to a complex interplay between virus and host immune response. It involves activation of multiple inflammatory pathways leading to hyperinflammation and cytokine storm, resulting in tissue damage, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multi-organ failure. Accumulating evidence has raised concern over the long-term health effects of COVID-19. Importantly, the neuroinvasive potential of SARS-CoV-2 may have devastating consequences in the brain. This review provides a conceptual framework on how the virus tricks the host immune system to induce infection and cause severe disease. We also explore the key differences between mild and severe COVID-19 and its short- and long-term effects, particularly on the human brain.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Sex Factors
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 738697, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477824

ABSTRACT

The severe respiratory consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have prompted the urgent need for novel therapies. Cell-based therapies, primarily using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy in the treatment of critical illness, particularly sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there are limited preclinical data for MSCs in COVID-19. Recent studies have shown that MSCs could decrease inflammation, improve lung permeability, enhance microbe and alveolar fluid clearance, and promote lung epithelial and endothelial repair. In addition, MSC-based therapy has shown promising effects in preclinical studies and phase 1 clinical trials in sepsis and ARDS. Here, we review recent advances related to MSC-based therapy in the context of sepsis and ARDS and evaluate the potential value of MSCs as a therapeutic strategy for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/therapy
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 735922, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477823

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a major public health issue. COVID-19 is considered an airway/multi-systemic disease, and demise has been associated with an uncontrolled immune response and a cytokine storm in response to the virus. However, the lung pathology, immune response, and tissue damage associated with COVID-19 demise are poorly described and understood due to safety concerns. Using post-mortem lung tissues from uninfected and COVID-19 deadly cases as well as an unbiased combined analysis of histology, multi-viral and host markers staining, correlative microscopy, confocal, and image analysis, we identified three distinct phenotypes of COVID-19-induced lung damage. First, a COVID-19-induced hemorrhage characterized by minimal immune infiltration and large thrombus; Second, a COVID-19-induced immune infiltration with excessive immune cell infiltration but no hemorrhagic events. The third phenotype correspond to the combination of the two previous ones. We observed the loss of alveolar wall integrity, detachment of lung tissue pieces, fibroblast proliferation, and extensive fibrosis in all three phenotypes. Although lung tissues studied were from lethal COVID-19, a strong immune response was observed in all cases analyzed with significant B cell and poor T cell infiltrations, suggesting an exhausted or compromised immune cellular response in these patients. Overall, our data show that SARS-CoV-2-induced lung damage is highly heterogeneous. These individual differences need to be considered to understand the acute and long-term COVID-19 consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Lung Injury/pathology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Female , Hemorrhage/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lung/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/pathology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology
9.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471000

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious respiratory disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that mainly affects the lungs. COVID-19 symptoms include the presence of fevers, dry coughs, fatigue, sore throat, headaches, diarrhea, and a loss of taste or smell. However, it is understood that SARS-CoV-2 is neurotoxic and neuro-invasive and could enter the central nervous system (CNS) via the hematogenous route or via the peripheral nerve route and causes encephalitis, encephalopathy, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in COVID-19 patients. This review discusses the possibility of SARS-CoV-2-mediated Multiple Sclerosis (MS) development in the future, comparable to the surge in Parkinson's disease cases following the Spanish Flu in 1918. Moreover, the SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with a cytokine storm. This review highlights the impact of these modulated cytokines on glial cell interactions within the CNS and their role in potentially prompting MS development as a secondary disease by SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 is neurotropic and could interfere with various functions of neurons leading to MS development. The influence of neuroinflammation, microglia phagocytotic capabilities, as well as hypoxia-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, are mechanisms that may ultimately trigger MS development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System/pathology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/virology , Central Nervous System/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , History, 20th Century , Humans , Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919/statistics & numerical data , Multiple Sclerosis/virology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470895

ABSTRACT

Innate and adaptive immune responses have a well-known link and represent the distinctive origins of several diseases, many of which may be the consequence of the loss of balance between these two responses. Indeed, autoinflammation and autoimmunity represent the two extremes of a continuous spectrum of pathologic conditions with numerous overlaps in different pathologies. A common characteristic of these dysregulations is represented by hyperinflammation, which is an exaggerated response of the immune system, especially involving white blood cells, macrophages, and inflammasome activation with the hyperproduction of cytokines in response to various triggering stimuli. Moreover, hyperinflammation is of great interest, as it is one of the main manifestations of COVID-19 infection, and the cytokine storm and its most important components are the targets of the pharmacological treatments used to combat COVID-19 damage. In this context, the purpose of our review is to provide a focus on the pathogenesis of autoinflammation and, in particular, of hyperinflammation in order to generate insights for the identification of new therapeutic targets and strategies.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity , Autoimmune Diseases/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Immunity, Innate , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470887

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected >235 million people and killed over 4.8 million individuals worldwide. Although vaccines have been developed for prophylactic management, there are no clinically proven antivirals to treat the viral infection. Continuous efforts are being made all over the world to develop effective drugs but these are being delayed by periodic outbreak of mutated SARS-CoV-2 and a lack of knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis and post-infection complications. In this regard, the involvement of Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a lipid-raft related phospholipid-binding protein, in SARS-CoV-2 attachment, internalization, and replication has been discussed. In addition to the evidence from published literature, we have performed in silico docking of viral spike glycoprotein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with human AnxA2 to find the molecular interactions. Overall, this review provides the molecular insights into a potential role of AnxA2 in the SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and post-infection complications, especially thrombosis, cytokine storm, and insulin resistance.


Subject(s)
Annexin A2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Annexin A2/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , Virus Internalization
12.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 213: 105964, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433601

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the vitamin D status of pregnant women with COVID-19, and the association between vitamin D level and severity of COVID-19. METHODS: In this case control study, 159 women with a single pregnancy and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and randomly selected 332 healthy pregnant women with similar gestational ages were included. COVID-19 patients were classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxycholecalciferol <20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L), and 25-OH D vitamin <10 ng/mL was defined as severe vitamin D deficiency, also 25-OH D vitamin level between 20-29 ng/mL (525-725 nmol/L) was defined as vitamin D insufficiency. RESULTS: Vitamin D levels of the pregnant women in the COVID-19 group (12.46) were lower than the control group (18.76). 25-OH D vitamin levels of those in the mild COVID-19 category (13.69) were significantly higher than those in the moderate/severe category (9.06). In terms of taking vitamin D supplementation, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. However, it was observed that all of those who had severe COVID-19 were the patients who did not take vitamin D supplementation. CONCLUSION: The vitamin D levels are low in pregnant women with COVID-19. Also, there is a significant difference regarding to vitamin D level and COVID-19 severity in pregnant women. Maintenance of adequate vitamin D level can be useful as an approach for the prevention of an aggressive course of the inflammation induced by this novel coronavirus in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diet therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diet therapy , Dietary Supplements , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diet therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Calcifediol/blood , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/pathology , Vitamin D Deficiency/virology
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409702

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic with high infectivity and mortality has caused severe social and economic impacts worldwide. Growing reports of COVID-19 patients with multi-organ damage indicated that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) may also disturb the cardiovascular system. Herein, we used human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (iCMs) as the in vitro platform to examine the consequence of SARS-CoV2 infection on iCMs. Differentiated iCMs expressed the primary SARS-CoV2 receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme-II (ACE2) and the transmembrane protease serine type 2 (TMPRSS2) receptor suggesting the susceptibility of iCMs to SARS-CoV2. Following the infection of iCMs with SARS-CoV2, the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein was detected in the host cells, demonstrating the successful infection. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the SARS-CoV2 infection upregulates several inflammation-related genes, including the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The pretreatment of iCMs with TNF-α for 24 h, significantly increased the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2, SASR-CoV2 entry receptors. The TNF-α pretreatment enhanced the entry of GFP-expressing SARS-CoV2 pseudovirus into iCMs, and the neutralization of TNF-α ameliorated the TNF-α-enhanced viral entry. Collectively, SARS-CoV2 elevated TNF-α expression, which in turn enhanced the SARS-CoV2 viral entry. Our findings suggest that, TNF-α may participate in the cytokine storm and aggravate the myocardial damage in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Cell Differentiation , Cell Line , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells , Myocardium/cytology , Myocardium/immunology , Myocardium/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Up-Regulation/immunology , Virus Internalization/drug effects
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384240

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
18.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2021: 8671713, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378091

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic represents an ongoing healthcare emergency responsible for more than 3.4 million deaths worldwide. COVID-19 is the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, a virus that targets not only the lungs but also the cardiovascular system. COVID-19 can manifest with a wide range of clinical manifestations, from mild symptoms to severe forms of the disease, characterized by respiratory failure due to severe alveolar damage. Several studies investigated the underlying mechanisms of the severe lung damage associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and revealed that the respiratory failure associated with COVID-19 is the consequence not only of acute respiratory distress syndrome but also of macro- and microvascular involvement. New observations show that COVID-19 is an endothelial disease, and the consequent endotheliopathy is responsible for inflammation, cytokine storm, oxidative stress, and coagulopathy. In this review, we show the central role of endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress in the COVID-19 pathogenesis and present the therapeutic targets deriving from this endotheliopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Inflammation/pathology , Oxidative Stress , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vascular Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/therapy , Vascular Diseases/etiology , Vascular Diseases/therapy
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 726909, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359195

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in preclinical and clinical trials for various diseases and have shown great potential in the treatment of sepsis and coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Inflammatory factors play vital roles in the pathogenesis of diseases. The interaction between inflammatory factors is extremely complex. Once the dynamics of inflammatory factors are unbalanced, inflammatory responses and cytokine storm syndrome develop, leading to disease exacerbation and even death. Stem cells have become ideal candidates for the treatment of such diseases due to their immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the mechanisms by which stem cells affect inflammation and immune regulation are still unclear. This article discusses the therapeutic mechanism and potential value of MSCs in the treatment of sepsis and the novel COVID-19, outlines how MSCs mediate innate and acquired immunity at both the cellular and molecular levels, and described the anti-inflammatory mechanisms and related molecular pathways. Finally, we review the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy in these two diseases at the preclinical and clinical levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control
20.
Biomolecules ; 11(8)2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354915

ABSTRACT

The term 'cytokine storm' (CS) applies to a pathological autoimmune reaction when the interactions that lead to cytokine production are destabilised and may even lead to death. CS may be induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In this study, we present our analysis of certain pathological processes that induce a CS in pregnant and postpartum women. We draw our attention to the similarities between the severe course of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). It is noteworthy that many of the criteria used to diagnose HLH are described as COVID-19 mortality predictors. Cytokine storms are considered to be an important cause of death in patients with the severe course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Due to the fact that pregnant women are in an immunosuppressive state, viral pulmonary infections are more perilous for them-possible risks include miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction or birth before the term; sometimes ventilation support is needed. HLH should be considered in pregnant and puerperal women suffering from moderately severe to severe COVID-19 and presenting with: fever unresponsive to antibiotic therapy, cytopenia, hepatitis and hyperferritinaemia. The HLH disorder is rare and difficult to diagnose; however, its early detection could reduce patient mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/immunology , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology
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