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1.
ACS Appl Bio Mater ; 5(2): 483-491, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805546

ABSTRACT

Interleukin-mediated deep cytokine storm, an aggressive inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection in COVID-19 patients, is correlated directly with lung injury, multi-organ failure, and poor prognosis of severe COVID-19 patients. Curcumin (CUR), a phenolic antioxidant compound obtained from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), is well-known for its strong anti-inflammatory activity. However, its in vivo efficacy is constrained due to poor bioavailability. Herein, we report that CUR-encapsulated polysaccharide nanoparticles (CUR-PS-NPs) potently inhibit the release of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors associated with damage of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (CoV2-SP)-stimulated liver Huh7.5 and lung A549 epithelial cells. Treatment with CUR-PS-NPs effectively attenuated the interaction of ACE2 and CoV2-SP. The effects of CUR-PS-NPs were linked to reduced NF-κB/MAPK signaling which in turn decreased CoV2-SP-mediated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, p42/44 MAPK, and p65/NF-κB as well as nuclear p65/NF-κB expression. The findings of the study strongly indicate that organic NPs of CUR can be used to control hyper-inflammatory responses and prevent lung and liver injuries associated with CoV2-SP-mediated cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Curcumin/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacokinetics , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chemokines/biosynthesis , Curcumin/chemistry , Curcumin/pharmacokinetics , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/biosynthesis , Phosphorylation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology
2.
J Infect Public Health ; 15(5): 566-572, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763843

ABSTRACT

An unprecedented global health crisis has developed due to the emergence of the mysterious coronavirus-2 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome, which has resulted in millions of deaths around the globe, as no therapy could control the 'cytokine storm'. Consequently, many vaccines have been developed and several others are being developed for this infection. Although most of the approved vaccines have been highly effective, many developing, and economically poor countries are still deprived of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 due to the unequal distribution of vaccines worldwide. Furthermore, the uncertainty about the effectiveness of the available vaccines against the emerging mutants and variants also remains a matter of concern. Due to the multistep pathogenesis and unique features, combination therapy using safe immunomodulatory and antiviral drugs should be considered as the most effective and acceptable therapeutic regimen for this infection. Based on a thorough assessment of the literature, it was determined that it would be interesting to study the therapeutic potential of ivermectin and doxycycline, given their roles in several biological pathways involved in SARS CoV-2 pathogenesis. Following that, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken using Scopus, Web of Science, and Pubmed, depending on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The present study provides a mechanism and comprehensive report, highlighting the role of combined therapy with ivermectin and doxycycline in alleviating the 'cytokine storm' of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Humans , Ivermectin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
Pharmacol Res Perspect ; 10(2): e00940, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712175

ABSTRACT

Anti-proinflammatory cytokine therapies against interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1 are major advancements in treating inflammatory diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis. Such therapies are mainly performed by injection of antibodies against cytokines or cytokine receptors. We initially found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), a simple monosaccharide, attenuated cellular responses to IL-6 by inhibiting N-linked glycosylation of the IL-6 receptor gp130. Aglycoforms of gp130 did not bind to IL-6 or activate downstream intracellular signals that included Janus kinases. 2-DG completely inhibited dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis, a mouse model for inflammatory bowel disease, and alleviated laminarin-induced arthritis in the SKG mouse, an experimental model for human rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases have been shown to be partially dependent on IL-6. We also found that 2-DG inhibited signals for other proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1ß, and interferon -γ, and accordingly, prevented death by another inflammatory disease, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) shock. Furthermore, 2-DG prevented LPS shock, a model for a cytokine storm, and LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These results suggest that targeted therapies that inhibit cytokine receptor glycosylation are effective for treatment of various inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Deoxyglucose/pharmacology , Glycosylation/drug effects , Inflammation/prevention & control , Receptors, Cytokine/drug effects , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Cytokine Receptor gp130/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokine Receptor gp130/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/chemically induced , Janus Kinases/drug effects , Lipopolysaccharides , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Receptors, Cytokine/immunology , Receptors, Cytokine/metabolism , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/metabolism
4.
Life Sci ; 294: 120392, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670857

ABSTRACT

The SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) causes Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19), is an emerging viral infection. SARS CoV-2 infects target cells by attaching to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE2). SARS CoV-2 could cause cardiac damage in patients with severe COVID-19, as ACE2 is expressed in cardiac cells, including cardiomyocytes, pericytes, and fibroblasts, and coronavirus could directly infect these cells. Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent comorbidity found in COVID-19 patients. Immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, and T cells may produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to COVID-19 pathogenesis if their functions are uncontrolled. This causes a cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients, which has been associated with cardiac damage. Tregs are a subset of immune cells that regulate immune and inflammatory responses. Tregs suppress inflammation and improve cardiovascular function through a variety of mechanisms. This is an exciting research area to explore the cellular, molecular, and immunological mechanisms related to reducing risks of cardiovascular complications in severe COVID-19. This review evaluated whether Tregs can affect COVID-19-related cardiovascular complications, as well as the mechanisms through which Tregs act.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/physiology , Adoptive Transfer , Animals , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1626, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661980

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is one of the biggest health challenges of recent decades. Among the causes of mortality triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection, the development of an inflammatory "cytokine storm" (CS) plays a determinant role. Here, we used transcriptomic data from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients undergoing a CS to obtain gene-signatures associated to this pathology. Using these signatures, we interrogated the Connectivity Map (CMap) dataset that contains the effects of over 5000 small molecules on the transcriptome of human cell lines, and looked for molecules which effects on transcription mimic or oppose those of the CS. As expected, molecules that potentiate immune responses such as PKC activators are predicted to worsen the CS. In addition, we identified the negative regulation of female hormones among pathways potentially aggravating the CS, which helps to understand the gender-related differences in COVID-19 mortality. Regarding drugs potentially counteracting the CS, we identified glucocorticoids as a top hit, which validates our approach as this is the primary treatment for this pathology. Interestingly, our analysis also reveals a potential effect of MEK inhibitors in reverting the COVID-19 CS, which is supported by in vitro data that confirms the anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokines/blood , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Humans , MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Male , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Sex Factors , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648620

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), also known as COVID-19, is currently developing into a rapidly disseminating and an overwhelming worldwide pandemic. In severe COVID-19 cases, hypercoagulability and inflammation are two crucial complications responsible for poor prognosis and mortality. In addition, coagulation system activation and inflammation overlap and produce life-threatening complications, including coagulopathy and cytokine storm, which are associated with overproduction of cytokines and activation of the immune system; they might be a lead cause of organ damage. However, patients with severe COVID-19 who received anticoagulant therapy had lower mortality, especially with elevated D-dimer or fibrin degradation products (FDP). In this regard, the discovery of natural products with anticoagulant potential may help mitigate the numerous side effects of the available synthetic drugs. This review sheds light on blood coagulation and its impact on the complication associated with COVID-19. Furthermore, the sources of natural anticoagulants, the role of nanoparticle formulation in this outbreak, and the prevalence of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) after COVID-19 vaccines are also reviewed. These combined data provide many research ideas related to the possibility of using these anticoagulant agents as a treatment to relieve acute symptoms of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/isolation & purification , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/classification , Blood Coagulation Disorders/prevention & control , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/prevention & control , Nanoparticles/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombophilia/etiology
7.
Mol Biol Rep ; 49(3): 2303-2309, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648443

ABSTRACT

Global vaccination effort and better understanding of treatment strategies provided a ray of hope for improvement in COVID-19 pandemic, however, in many countries, the disease continues to collect its death toll. The major pathogenic mechanism behind severe cases associated with high mortality is the burst of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-6, IFNγ and others, resulting in multiple organ failure. Although the exact contribution of each cytokine is not clear, we provide an evidence that the central mediator of cytokine storm and its devastating consequences may be TNF. This cytokine is known to be involved in activated blood clotting, lung damage, insulin resistance, heart failure, and other conditions. A number of currently available pharmaceutical agents such as monoclonal antibodies and soluble TNF receptors can effectively prevent TNF from binding to its receptor(s). Other drugs are known to block NFkB, the major signal transducer molecule used in TNF signaling, or to block kinases involved in downstream activation cascades. Some of these medicines have already been selected for clinical trials, but more work is needed. A simple, rapid, and inexpensive method of directly monitoring TNF levels may be a valuable tool for a timely selection of COVID-19 patients for anti-TNF therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/prevention & control , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Patient Selection , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/pharmacology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/physiology
8.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629955

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
9.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625815

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, a member of the coronavirus family, is the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, there is still an urgent need in developing an efficient therapeutic intervention. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the therapeutic effect of a single intranasal treatment of the TLR3/MDA5 synthetic agonist Poly(I:C) against a lethal dose of SARS-CoV-2 in K18-hACE2 transgenic mice. We demonstrate here that early Poly(I:C) treatment acts synergistically with SARS-CoV-2 to induce an intense, immediate and transient upregulation of innate immunity-related genes in lungs. This effect is accompanied by viral load reduction, lung and brain cytokine storms prevention and increased levels of macrophages and NK cells, resulting in 83% mice survival, concomitantly with long-term immunization. Thus, priming the lung innate immunity by Poly(I:C) or alike may provide an immediate, efficient and safe protective measure against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Innate , Poly I-C/immunology , Poly I-C/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Toll-Like Receptor 3/agonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/immunology , Viral Load/drug effects
10.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 104: 108516, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611782

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is a worldwide infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, there is severe inflammatory reactions due to neutrophil recruitments and infiltration in the different organs with the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which involved various complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to explore the potential role of NETs in the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and to identify the targeting drugs against NETs in Covid-19 patients. Different enzyme types are involved in the formation of NETs, such as neutrophil elastase (NE), which degrades nuclear protein and release histones, peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PADA4), which releases chromosomal DNA and gasdermin D, which creates pores in the NTs cell membrane that facilitating expulsion of NT contents. Despite of the beneficial effects of NETs in controlling of invading pathogens, sustained formations of NETs during respiratory viral infections are associated with collateral tissue injury. Excessive development of NETs in SARS-CoV-2 infection is linked with the development of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to creation of the NETs-IL-1ß loop. Also, aberrant NTs activation alone or through NETs formation may augment SARS-CoV-2-induced cytokine storm (CS) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with severe Covid-19. Furthermore, NETs formation in SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with immuno-thrombosis and the development of ALI/ARDS. Therefore, anti-NETs therapy of natural or synthetic sources may mitigate SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced exaggerated immune response, hyperinflammation, immuno-thrombosis, and other complications.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/prevention & control , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Extracellular Traps/drug effects , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Leukocyte Elastase/antagonists & inhibitors , Leukocyte Elastase/metabolism , Neutrophil Infiltration/drug effects , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins/metabolism , Protein-Arginine Deiminase Type 4/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein-Arginine Deiminase Type 4/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
11.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1934685, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine release syndrome can be observed during the course of COVID-19. Tocilizumab is used for treating this highly fatal syndrome. We think that the starting time of tocilizumab is important. In this article, we aimed to discuss the efficacy of tocilizumab and to review the necessity of starting it in the early period and the laboratory values that guide us in determining the time of this early period. METHODS: This retrospective study includes a total of 308 patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 who were treated with tocilizumab, who were hospitalized in the University of Health Sciences, Gazi Yasargil Training and Research Hospital between July 2020 and December 2020. The data of the patients were recorded on the day of hospitalization, the day of taking tocilizumab (day 0), and the 1st day, 3rd day, 7th day, and 14th day after taking tocilizumab. Data included age, gender, underlying diseases, where the patient was followed, duration of symptoms before admission to the hospital, duration of oxygen demand before tocilizumab, fever, saturation, and laboratory values. Patients were divided into the mortality group (group 1) and the survival group (group 2), and all data were compared. RESULTS: The study consisted of 308 COVID-19 patients divided into two groups: the mortality group (group 1, n = 135) and the survival group (group 2, n = 173). The median age of the patients was 60 (min-max: 50-70) years, 75.3% (n = 232) were male, and 56.8% had at least one comorbidity. While 88.9% of group 1 was in the intensive care unit, 26.6% of group 2 received tocilizumab while in the intensive care unit, and there was a statistically significant difference. Median SpO2 values and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2, both on the day of hospitalization and on the day of the first dose of tocilizumab treatment (p < 0.001 for both). C-reactive protein, d-dimer, and alanine aminotransferase values were higher in the mortal group on the first day of hospitalization, and this was significant (p = 0.021, p = 0.001, and p = 0.036, respectively). In our study, d-dimer was 766.5 ng/mL in the survivor group and 988.5 ng/mL in the mortal group. In our patient group, the mean lymphocyte count was 700 × 103/mm3 in the group that survived the first day of TCZ and 500 × 103/mm3 in the mortal group. In addition, the CRP value was 135.5 mg/L in the survivor group and 169 mg/L in the mortal group. There was no difference between ferritin values. CONCLUSIONS: Tocilizumab is still among the COVID-19 treatment options and appears to be effective. But the start time is important. In order to increase its effectiveness, it may be important to know a cut-off value of the laboratory findings required for the diagnosis of cytokine release syndrome. Further studies are needed for this.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Aged , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 172(2): 250-253, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544492

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are characterized by tolerogenic potential and therefore, are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to improve the transplant functions, as well as for the therapy and prevention of cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients and some other conditions. However, MSC can exhibit proinflammatory activity, which causes risks for their clinical use. We studied the cytokine profile of bone marrow MSC culture and demonstrate intensive production of IL-6, IL-8, and chemokine MCP-1, which participate in the pathogenesis of cytokine storm and GVHD. At the same time, no anti-inflammatory IL-4 and IL-10 were detected. To reduce the risks of MSC application in the GVHD therapeutic protocols, further studies of the conditions promoting generation of MSC with tolerogenic potential and approved clinical standards of MSC use are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/analysis , Graft vs Host Disease/prevention & control , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Bone Marrow Cells/immunology , Bone Marrow Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Chemokine CCL2/analysis , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/analysis , Interleukin-8/analysis , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects
13.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6605-6610, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544306

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We have previously demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency might be associated with worse outcomes in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. The aim of our study was to explore this relationship with dexamethasone therapy. METHODS: We prospectively studied two cohorts of hospitalized Covid-19 patients between March and April and between September and December 2020 (n = 192). Patients were tested for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) levels during admission. The first cohort not treated with dexamethasone (n = 107) was divided into vitamin D deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 47) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 60). The second cohort treated with dexamethasone (n = 85) was similarly divided into deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 27) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 58). Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and secondary outcomes were elevation in markers of cytokine storm and ventilatory requirement. RESULTS: No mortality difference was identified between cohorts and subgroups. The "no dexamethasone" cohort 25-OH-D deplete subgroup recorded significantly higher peak D-Dimer levels (1874 vs. 1233 µgFEU/L) (p = 0.0309), CRP (177 vs. 107.5) (p = 0.0055), and ventilatory support requirement (25.5% vs. 6.67%) (p = 0.007) compared to the replete subgroup. Among the 25-OH-D deplete subgroup higher peak neutrophil counts, peak CRP, peak LDH, peak ferritin, and lower trough lymphocyte counts were observed, without statistical significance. In the "dexamethasone" cohort, there was no apparent association between 25-OH-D deficiency and markers of cytokine storm or ventilatory requirement. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with elevated markers of cytokine storm and higher ventilatory requirements in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Dexamethasone treatment appears to mitigate adverse effects of vitamin D deficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/blood , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood
14.
Drug Dev Res ; 83(1): 16-54, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508642

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has become a global threat since its first outbreak at the end of 2019. Several review articles have been published recently, focusing on the aspects of target biology, drug repurposing, and mechanisms of action (MOAs) for potential treatment. This review gathers all small molecules currently in active clinical trials, categorizes them into six sub-classes, and summarizes their clinical progress. The aim is to provide the researchers from both pharmaceutical industries and academic institutes with the handful information and dataset to accelerate their research programs in searching effective small molecule therapy for treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Drug Industry , Humans , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 43(6): 633-643, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467231

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), at first, was reported in Wuhan, China, and then rapidly became pandemic throughout the world. Cytokine storm syndrome (CSS) in COVID-19 patients is associated with high levels of cytokines and chemokines that cause multiple organ failure, systemic inflammation, and hemodynamic instabilities. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a common complication of COVID-19, is a consequence of cytokine storm. In this regard, several drugs have been being investigated to suppress this inflammatory condition. Purinergic signaling receptors comprising of P1 adenosine and P2 purinoceptors play a critical role in inflammation. Therefore, activation or inhibition of some subtypes of these kinds of receptors is most likely to be beneficial to attenuate cytokine storm. This article summarizes suggested therapeutic drugs with potential anti-inflammatory effects through purinergic receptors.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/blood , Purinergic Antagonists/therapeutic use , Receptors, Purinergic/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/immunology , Multiple Organ Failure/prevention & control , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Purinergic Antagonists/adverse effects , Receptors, Purinergic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction
16.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(6): 1472-1475, 2021 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450911

ABSTRACT

Human lives and nations' economies have been adversely affected worldwide by the COVID-19 pandemic. The hyperinflammatory state associated with the disease may be related to mortality. Systemic glucocorticoid is the first-line therapy for cytokine storm. Various immunomodulatory drugs such as tocilizumab and baricitinib have been used in those not responding to glucocorticoid monotherapy. Amid the peak crisis of COVID-19 in India, there was an extreme paucity of medications, oxygen, and hospital beds. We describe three patients with COVID-19 who received low-dose tofacitinib (an oral Janus kinase inhibitor) in addition to moderate-dose glucocorticoid. These patients were treated at their homes, as the hospitals were short of beds. Rapid reduction in hypoxemia along with gradual resolution of other signs of the disease were observed. The results are reassuring regarding the feasibility of managing of severe COVID-19 outside the hospital setting when healthcare resources are overwhelmed by pandemic-related caseload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Piperidines/administration & dosage , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/administration & dosage
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(41)2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450313

ABSTRACT

Cancer therapy reduces tumor burden via tumor cell death ("debris"), which can accelerate tumor progression via the failure of inflammation resolution. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities that stimulate the clearance or resolution of inflammation-associated debris. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy-generated debris stimulates metastasis by up-regulating soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and the prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4). Therapy-induced tumor cell debris triggers a storm of proinflammatory and proangiogenic eicosanoid-driven cytokines. Thus, targeting a single eicosanoid or cytokine is unlikely to prevent chemotherapy-induced metastasis. Pharmacological abrogation of both sEH and EP4 eicosanoid pathways prevents hepato-pancreatic tumor growth and liver metastasis by promoting macrophage phagocytosis of debris and counterregulating a protumorigenic eicosanoid and cytokine storm. Therefore, stimulating the clearance of tumor cell debris via combined sEH and EP4 inhibition is an approach to prevent debris-stimulated metastasis and tumor growth.


Subject(s)
Eicosanoids/metabolism , Epoxide Hydrolases/biosynthesis , Macrophages/immunology , Neoplasm Metastasis/pathology , Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype/biosynthesis , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/metabolism , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neoplasm Metastasis/prevention & control , Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Phagocytosis/immunology , RAW 264.7 Cells
18.
J Virol ; 95(20): e0059221, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440799

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has led to dramatic economic and health burdens. Although the worldwide SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaign has begun, exploration of other vaccine candidates is needed due to uncertainties with the current approved vaccines, such as durability of protection, cross-protection against variant strains, and costs of long-term production and storage. In this study, we developed a methyltransferase-defective recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (mtdVSV)-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate. We generated mtdVSVs expressing SARS-CoV-2 full-length spike (S) protein, S1, or its receptor-binding domain (RBD). All of these recombinant viruses grew to high titers in mammalian cells despite high attenuation in cell culture. The SARS-CoV-2 S protein and its truncations were highly expressed by the mtdVSV vector. These mtdVSV-based vaccine candidates were completely attenuated in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice. Among these constructs, mtdVSV-S induced high levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and Th1-biased T-cell immune responses in mice. In Syrian golden hamsters, the serum levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific NAbs triggered by mtdVSV-S were higher than the levels of NAbs in convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients. In addition, hamsters immunized with mtdVSV-S were completely protected against SARS-CoV-2 replication in lung and nasal turbinate tissues, cytokine storm, and lung pathology. Collectively, our data demonstrate that mtdVSV expressing SARS-CoV-2 S protein is a safe and highly efficacious vaccine candidate against SARS-CoV-2 infection. IMPORTANCE Viral mRNA cap methyltransferase (MTase) is essential for mRNA stability, protein translation, and innate immune evasion. Thus, viral mRNA cap MTase activity is an excellent target for development of live attenuated or live vectored vaccine candidates. Here, we developed a panel of MTase-defective recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (mtdVSV)-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates expressing full-length S, S1, or several versions of the RBD. These mtdVSV-based vaccine candidates grew to high titers in cell culture and were completely attenuated in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice. Among these vaccine candidates, mtdVSV-S induces high levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) and Th1-biased immune responses in mice. Syrian golden hamsters immunized with mtdVSV-S triggered SARS-CoV-2-specific NAbs at higher levels than those in convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, hamsters immunized with mtdVSV-S were completely protected against SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Thus, mtdVSV is a safe and highly effective vector to deliver SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Brain/virology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/metabolism , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mesocricetus , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Mice , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus/enzymology , Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus/physiology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
19.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 145: 112243, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432984

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this pilot clinical study, we report the beneficial effects of beta glucans derived from two strains AFO-202 and N-163 of a black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans on the biomarkers for cytokine storm and coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 24 RT-PCR positive COVID-19 patients were recruited and randomly divided into three groups (Gr): Gr. 1 control (n = 8) - Standard treatment; Gr. 2: Standard treatment + AFO-202 beta glucan (n = 8); and Gr. 3, Standard treatment + combination of AFO-202 and N-163 beta glucans (n = 8) for 30 days. RESULTS: There was no mortality or requirement of ventilation of the subjects in any of the groups. There was a decrease in D-Dimer values (751 ng/ml to 143.89 ng/ml) and IL-6 values (7.395-3.16 pg/ml) in Gr. 1 in 15 days but the levels increased to abnormal levels on day 30 (D-Dimer: 202.5 ng/ml; IL-6 55.37 pg/ml); which steadily decreased up to day 30 in groups 2 (D-dimer: 560.99 ng/dl to 79.615; IL-6: 26.18-3.41 pg/ml) and 3 (D-dimer: 1614 ng/dl to 164.25 ng/dl; IL-6: 6.25-0.5 pg/ml). The same trend was observed with ESR. LCR and LeCR increased while NLR decreased significantly in Gr. 3. CD4 + and CD8 + T cell count showed relatively higher increase in Gr.3. There was no difference in CRP within the groups. CONCLUSION: As these beta glucans are well known food supplements with a track record for safety, larger multi-centric clinical studies are recommended to validate their use as an adjunct in the management of COVID-19 and the ensuing long COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
Aureobasidium , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Interleukin-6/analysis , beta-Glucans/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complementary Therapies/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6605-6610, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400910

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We have previously demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency might be associated with worse outcomes in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. The aim of our study was to explore this relationship with dexamethasone therapy. METHODS: We prospectively studied two cohorts of hospitalized Covid-19 patients between March and April and between September and December 2020 (n = 192). Patients were tested for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) levels during admission. The first cohort not treated with dexamethasone (n = 107) was divided into vitamin D deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 47) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 60). The second cohort treated with dexamethasone (n = 85) was similarly divided into deficient (25-OH-D ≤ 30 nmol/L) (n = 27) and replete subgroups (25-OH-D > 30 nmol/L) (n = 58). Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and secondary outcomes were elevation in markers of cytokine storm and ventilatory requirement. RESULTS: No mortality difference was identified between cohorts and subgroups. The "no dexamethasone" cohort 25-OH-D deplete subgroup recorded significantly higher peak D-Dimer levels (1874 vs. 1233 µgFEU/L) (p = 0.0309), CRP (177 vs. 107.5) (p = 0.0055), and ventilatory support requirement (25.5% vs. 6.67%) (p = 0.007) compared to the replete subgroup. Among the 25-OH-D deplete subgroup higher peak neutrophil counts, peak CRP, peak LDH, peak ferritin, and lower trough lymphocyte counts were observed, without statistical significance. In the "dexamethasone" cohort, there was no apparent association between 25-OH-D deficiency and markers of cytokine storm or ventilatory requirement. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with elevated markers of cytokine storm and higher ventilatory requirements in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. Dexamethasone treatment appears to mitigate adverse effects of vitamin D deficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/blood , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood
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