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1.
Cell Rep ; 38(10): 110434, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729611

ABSTRACT

Type I interferons (IFN-I) are essential to establish antiviral innate immunity. Unanchored (or free) polyubiquitin (poly-Ub) has been shown to regulate IFN-I responses. However, few unanchored poly-Ub interactors are known. To identify factors regulated by unanchored poly-Ub in a physiological setting, we developed an approach to isolate unanchored poly-Ub from lung tissue. We identified the RNA helicase DHX16 as a potential pattern recognition receptor (PRR). Silencing of DHX16 in cells and in vivo diminished IFN-I responses against influenza virus. These effects extended to members of other virus families, including Zika and SARS-CoV-2. DHX16-dependent IFN-I production requires RIG-I and unanchored K48-poly-Ub synthesized by the E3-Ub ligase TRIM6. DHX16 recognizes a signal in influenza RNA segments that undergo splicing and requires its RNA helicase motif for direct, high-affinity interactions with specific viral RNAs. Our study establishes DHX16 as a PRR that partners with RIG-I for optimal activation of antiviral immunity requiring unanchored poly-Ub.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58 , Interferon Type I , RNA Helicases , RNA, Viral , Receptors, Immunologic , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , COVID-19 , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Type I/immunology , RNA Helicases/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tripartite Motif Proteins , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus Infection/immunology
2.
Genes (Basel) ; 13(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580896

ABSTRACT

ADAR1-mediated deamination of adenosines in long double-stranded RNAs plays an important role in modulating the innate immune response. However, recent investigations based on metatranscriptomic samples of COVID-19 patients and SARS-COV-2-infected Vero cells have recovered contrasting findings. Using RNAseq data from time course experiments of infected human cell lines and transcriptome data from Vero cells and clinical samples, we prove that A-to-G changes observed in SARS-COV-2 genomes represent genuine RNA editing events, likely mediated by ADAR1. While the A-to-I editing rate is generally low, changes are distributed along the entire viral genome, are overrepresented in exonic regions, and are (in the majority of cases) nonsynonymous. The impact of RNA editing on virus-host interactions could be relevant to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genome, Viral , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , RNA Editing , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Deamination , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inosine/metabolism , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/immunology , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/immunology , RNA, Viral/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome , Vero Cells
3.
Acc Chem Res ; 54(21): 4012-4023, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483069

ABSTRACT

In vitro-transcribed RNAs are emerging as new biologics for therapeutic innovation, as exemplified by their application recently in SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations. RNAs prepared by in vitro transcription (IVT) allow transient expression of proteins of interest, conferring safety over DNA- or virus-mediated gene delivery systems. However, in vitro-transcribed RNAs should be used with caution because of their immunogenicity, which is in part triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) byproducts during IVT. Cellular innate immune response to dsRNA byproducts can lead to undesirable consequences, including suppression of protein synthesis and cell death, which in turn can detrimentally impact the efficacy of mRNA therapy. Thus, it is critical to understand the nature of IVT byproducts and the mechanisms by which they trigger innate immune responses.Our lab has been investigating the mechanisms by which the innate immune system discriminates between "self" and "nonself" RNA, with the focus on the cytoplasmic dsRNA receptors retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated 5 (MDA5). We have biochemically and structurally characterized critical events involving RNA discrimination and signal transduction by RIG-I or MDA5. We have used in vitro-transcribed RNAs as tools to investigate RNA specificity of RIG-I and MDA5, which required optimization of the IVT reaction and purification processes to eliminate the effect of IVT byproducts. In this Account, we summarize our current understanding of RIG-I and MDA5 and IVT reactions and propose future directions for improving IVT as a method to generate both research tools and therapeutics. Other critical proteins in cellular innate immune response to dsRNAs are also discussed. We arrange the contents in the following order: (i) innate immunity sensors for nonself RNA, including the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) in the cytosol and the toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the endosome, as well as cytoplasmic dsRNA-responding proteins, including protein kinase R (PKR) and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases (OASes), illustrating the feature of protein-RNA binding and its consequences; (ii) the immunogenicity of IVT byproducts, specifically the generation of dsRNA molecules during IVT; and (iii) methods to reduce IVT RNA immunogenicity, including optimizations of RNA polymerases, reagents, and experimental conditions during IVT and subsequent purification.


Subject(s)
RNA, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 221, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387195
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5376-5389, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363676

ABSTRACT

The suppression of types I and III interferon (IFN) responses by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contributes to the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The strategy used by SARS-CoV-2 to evade antiviral immunity needs further investigation. Here, we reported that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited types I and III IFN production by targeting multiple molecules of innate antiviral signaling pathways. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b impaired the induction of types I and III IFNs by Sendai virus and poly (I:C). SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited the activation of types I and III IFNs induced by the components of cytosolic dsRNA-sensing pathways of RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS signaling, including RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TBK1, and IKKε, rather than IRF3-5D, which is the active form of IRF3. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b also suppressed the induction of types I and III IFNs by TRIF and STING, which are the adaptor protein of the endosome RNA-sensing pathway of TLR3-TRIF signaling and the adaptor protein of the cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway of cGAS-STING signaling, respectively. A mechanistic analysis revealed that the SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b protein interacted with RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TRIF, STING, and TBK1 and impeded the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b facilitated the replication of the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, the results showed that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b negatively regulates antiviral immunity and thus facilitates viral replication. This study contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 impairs antiviral immunity and provides an essential clue to the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/immunology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase/genetics , I-kappa B Kinase/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/metabolism , /immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Transfection , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/immunology
6.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325791

ABSTRACT

A weak production of INF-ß along with an exacerbated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines have been reported during infection by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus. SARS-CoV-2 encodes several proteins able to counteract the host immune system, which is believed to be one of the most important features contributing to the viral pathogenesis and development of a severe clinical picture. Previous reports have demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 N protein, along with some non-structural and accessory proteins, efficiently suppresses INF-ß production by interacting with RIG-I, an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) involved in the recognition of pathogen-derived molecules. In the present study, we better characterized the mechanism by which the SARS-CoV-2 N counteracts INF-ß secretion and affects RIG-I signaling pathways. In detail, when the N protein was ectopically expressed, we noted a marked decrease in TRIM25-mediated RIG-I activation. The capability of the N protein to bind to, and probably mask, TRIM25 could be the consequence of its antagonistic activity. Furthermore, this interaction occurred at the SPRY domain of TRIM25, harboring the RNA-binding activity necessary for TRIM25 self-activation. Here, we describe new findings regarding the interplay between SARS-CoV-2 and the IFN system, filling some gaps for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms affecting the innate immune response in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcription Factors/immunology , Tripartite Motif Proteins/immunology , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/immunology , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factors/genetics , Tripartite Motif Proteins/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 688758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304592

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a known global threat, and most recently the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has claimed more than 2 million human lives. Delays and interference with IFN responses are closely associated with the severity of disease caused by CoV infection. As the most abundant viral protein in infected cells just after the entry step, the CoV nucleocapsid (N) protein likely plays a key role in IFN interruption. We have conducted a comprehensive comparative analysis and report herein that the N proteins of representative human and animal CoVs from four different genera [swine acute diarrhea syndrome CoV (SADS-CoV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), SARS-CoV-2, Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV)] suppress IFN responses by multiple strategies. In particular, we found that the N protein of SADS-CoV interacted with RIG-I independent of its RNA binding activity, mediating K27-, K48- and K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I and its subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation, thus inhibiting the host IFN response. These data provide insight into the interaction between CoVs and host, and offer new clues for the development of therapies against these important viruses.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Deltacoronavirus/genetics , Deltacoronavirus/immunology , Humans , Infectious bronchitis virus/genetics , Infectious bronchitis virus/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Phosphorylation , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Swine , Ubiquitination/physiology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 688758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295641

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a known global threat, and most recently the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has claimed more than 2 million human lives. Delays and interference with IFN responses are closely associated with the severity of disease caused by CoV infection. As the most abundant viral protein in infected cells just after the entry step, the CoV nucleocapsid (N) protein likely plays a key role in IFN interruption. We have conducted a comprehensive comparative analysis and report herein that the N proteins of representative human and animal CoVs from four different genera [swine acute diarrhea syndrome CoV (SADS-CoV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), SARS-CoV-2, Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV)] suppress IFN responses by multiple strategies. In particular, we found that the N protein of SADS-CoV interacted with RIG-I independent of its RNA binding activity, mediating K27-, K48- and K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I and its subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation, thus inhibiting the host IFN response. These data provide insight into the interaction between CoVs and host, and offer new clues for the development of therapies against these important viruses.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Deltacoronavirus/genetics , Deltacoronavirus/immunology , Humans , Infectious bronchitis virus/genetics , Infectious bronchitis virus/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Phosphorylation , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Swine , Ubiquitination/physiology
9.
EMBO J ; 40(15): e107826, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261483

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causes broad-spectrum immunopathological disease, exacerbated by inflammatory co-morbidities. A better understanding of mechanisms underpinning virus-associated inflammation is required to develop effective therapeutics. Here, we discover that SARS-CoV-2 replicates rapidly in lung epithelial cells despite triggering a robust innate immune response through the activation of cytoplasmic RNA sensors RIG-I and MDA5. The inflammatory mediators produced during epithelial cell infection can stimulate primary human macrophages to enhance cytokine production and drive cellular activation. Critically, this can be limited by abrogating RNA sensing or by inhibiting downstream signalling pathways. SARS-CoV-2 further exacerbates the local inflammatory environment when macrophages or epithelial cells are primed with exogenous inflammatory stimuli. We propose that RNA sensing of SARS-CoV-2 in lung epithelium is a key driver of inflammation, the extent of which is influenced by the inflammatory state of the local environment, and that specific inhibition of innate immune pathways may beneficially mitigate inflammation-associated COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , RNA, Viral/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Janus Kinases/immunology , Lung/cytology , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Macrophage Activation , NF-kappa B/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Virus Replication
10.
Nat Immunol ; 22(7): 820-828, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225511

ABSTRACT

Efficient immune responses against viral infection are determined by sufficient activation of nucleic acid sensor-mediated innate immunity1,2. Coronavirus disease 2019, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains an ongoing global pandemic. It is an urgent challenge to clarify the innate recognition mechanism to control this virus. Here we show that retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) sufficiently restrains SARS-CoV-2 replication in human lung cells in a type I/III interferon (IFN)-independent manner. RIG-I recognizes the 3' untranslated region of the SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome via the helicase domains, but not the C-terminal domain. This new mode of RIG-I recognition does not stimulate its ATPase, thereby aborting the activation of the conventional mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein-dependent pathways, which is in accordance with lack of cytokine induction. Nevertheless, the interaction of RIG-I with the viral genome directly abrogates viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mediation of the first step of replication. Consistently, genetic ablation of RIG-I allows lung cells to produce viral particles that expressed the viral spike protein. By contrast, the anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity was restored by all-trans retinoic acid treatment through upregulation of RIG-I protein expression in primary lung cells derived from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thus, our findings demonstrate the distinctive role of RIG-I as a restraining factor in the early phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Lung/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , A549 Cells , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dogs , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Lung/virology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/immunology , Sf9 Cells , Signal Transduction/immunology , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/immunology
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5376-5389, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206842

ABSTRACT

The suppression of types I and III interferon (IFN) responses by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contributes to the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The strategy used by SARS-CoV-2 to evade antiviral immunity needs further investigation. Here, we reported that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited types I and III IFN production by targeting multiple molecules of innate antiviral signaling pathways. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b impaired the induction of types I and III IFNs by Sendai virus and poly (I:C). SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited the activation of types I and III IFNs induced by the components of cytosolic dsRNA-sensing pathways of RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS signaling, including RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TBK1, and IKKε, rather than IRF3-5D, which is the active form of IRF3. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b also suppressed the induction of types I and III IFNs by TRIF and STING, which are the adaptor protein of the endosome RNA-sensing pathway of TLR3-TRIF signaling and the adaptor protein of the cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway of cGAS-STING signaling, respectively. A mechanistic analysis revealed that the SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b protein interacted with RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TRIF, STING, and TBK1 and impeded the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b facilitated the replication of the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, the results showed that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b negatively regulates antiviral immunity and thus facilitates viral replication. This study contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 impairs antiviral immunity and provides an essential clue to the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/immunology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase/genetics , I-kappa B Kinase/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/metabolism , /immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Transfection , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/immunology
12.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 18(3): 539-555, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065857

ABSTRACT

Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) are RNA sensor molecules that play essential roles in innate antiviral immunity. Among the three RLRs encoded by the human genome, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, which contain N-terminal caspase recruitment domains, are activated upon the detection of viral RNAs in the cytoplasm of virus-infected cells. Activated RLRs induce downstream signaling via their interactions with mitochondrial antiviral signaling proteins and activate the production of type I and III interferons and inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have shown that RLR-mediated signaling is regulated by interactions with endogenous RNAs and host proteins, such as those involved in stress responses and posttranslational modifications. Since RLR-mediated cytokine production is also involved in the regulation of acquired immunity, the deregulation of RLR-mediated signaling is associated with autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders. Moreover, RLR-mediated signaling might be involved in the aberrant cytokine production observed in coronavirus disease 2019. Since the discovery of RLRs in 2004, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying the activation and regulation of RLR-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we review the recent advances in the understanding of regulated RNA recognition and signal activation by RLRs, focusing on the interactions between various host and viral factors.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Mitochondria/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Signal Transduction , Virus Diseases/immunology , Viruses/immunology , Animals , Humans , Immunologic Factors , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferons/immunology
13.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110250, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753092

ABSTRACT

This study presents two new concepts and definitions to the medical literature. One of those is "endogenous retinoic acid theory" and the other "retinoic acid depletion syndrome". A new classification will be provided for the immune system: "retinoic acid-dependent component" and "retinoic acid non-dependent component". If this theory is verified, all the diseases where the retinoic acid metabolism is defective and retinoic acid levels are low will be identified and new approaches will be developed fortreating such diseases. When the need for retinoic acids increases, such as acute infection, high fever, severe catabolic process, or chronic antigenic stimulation, cytochrome oxidase enzymes are inhibited by drugs or internal mechanisms. Metabolism and excretion of retinoic acids stored in the liver are prevented. In this way, retinoic acid levels in the blood are raised to therapeutic levels. This is called "Endogenous Retinoic Acid Theory". Retinoic acids also manage their metabolism through feedback mechanisms. Despite compensatory mechanisms, causes such as high fever, serious catabolic process and excessively large viral genome (SARS-CoV-2), excessive use of RIG-I and Type I interferon synthesis pathway using retinoic acid causes emptying of retinoic acid stores. As a result, the RIG-I pathway becomes ineffective, Type I IFN synthesis stops, and the congenital immune system collapses. Then the immune mechanism passes to TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, MDA5 and UPS pathways in the monocyte, macrophage, neutrophil and dendritic cells of the adaptive immune defense system that do not require retinoic acid. This leads to excessive TNFα and cytokine discharge from the pathway. With the depletion of retinoic acid stores as a result of this overuse, the immune defense mechanism switches from the congenital immune system to the adaptive immune system, where retinoic acids cannot be used. As a result of this depletion of retinoic acids, the shift of the immune system to the NFκB arm, which causes excessive cytokine release, is called "retinoic acid depletion syndrome". COVID-19 and previously defined sepsis, SIRS and ARDS are each retinoic acid depletion syndrome. We claim that retinoic acid metabolism is defective in most inflammatory diseases, particularly COVID-19 (cytokine storm) sepsis, SIRS and ARDS. Finding a solution to this mechanism will bring a new perspective and treatment approach to such diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Tretinoin/metabolism , Autoimmunity , COVID-19/metabolism , Carotenoids/metabolism , DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Humans , Immune System , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Models, Theoretical , Nervous System/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic , Syndrome , Viral Load , Vitamin A/pharmacology , Vitamin A Deficiency/metabolism , Zinc/metabolism
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