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1.
Neuroradiol J ; 35(2): 203-212, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817078

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Observational studies utilising diffusion tractography have suggested a common mechanism for tremor alleviation in deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: the decussating portion of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract. We hypothesised that directional stimulation of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract would result in greater tremor improvement compared to sham programming, as well as comparable improvement as more tedious standard-of-care programming. METHODS: A prospective, blinded crossover trial was performed to assess the feasibility, safety and outcomes of programming based solely on dentato-rubro-thalamic tract anatomy. Using magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-tractography, the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract was identified and a connectivity-based treatment setting was derived by modelling a volume of tissue activated using directional current steering oriented towards the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract centre. A sham setting was created at approximately 180° opposite the connectivity-based treatment. Standard-of-care programming at 3 months was compared to connectivity-based treatment and sham settings that were blinded to the programmer. The primary outcome measure was percentage improvement in the Fahn-Tolosa-Marín tremor rating score compared to the preoperative baseline. RESULTS: Among the six patients, tremor rating scores differed significantly among the three experimental conditions (P=0.030). The mean tremor rating score improvement was greater with the connectivity-based treatment settings (64.6% ± 14.3%) than with sham (44.8% ± 18.6%; P=0.031) and standard-of-care programming (50.7% ± 19.2%; P=0.062). The distance between the centre of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract and the volume of tissue activated inversely correlated with the percentage improvement in the tremor rating score (R2=0.24; P=0.04). No significant adverse events were encountered. CONCLUSIONS: Using a blinded, crossover trial design, we have shown the technical feasibility, safety and potential efficacy of connectivity-based stimulation settings in deep brain stimulation for treatment of essential tremor.


Subject(s)
Deep Brain Stimulation , Essential Tremor , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Essential Tremor/surgery , Essential Tremor/therapy , Humans , Prospective Studies , Thalamus/diagnostic imaging , Treatment Outcome , Tremor/surgery
3.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 30(2): 338-346, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750426

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A first-in-human responsive deep brain stimulation (rDBS) trial (NCT03868670) for obesity is under way, which is based on promising preclinical evidence. Given the upfront costs of rDBS, it is prudent to examine the success threshold for cost-effectiveness compared with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). METHODS: Efficacy and safety data on LRYGB and safety data on rDBS were collected for established indications through a literature search. The success threshold was defined as minimum BMI reduction. Treatment costs were calculated via Medicare national reimbursement data. RESULTS: LRYGB had a mean BMI reduction of 13.75 kg/m2 . Based on adverse events, LRYGB was a less-preferred health state (overall adverse event utility of 0.96 [0.02]) than rDBS (0.98 [0.01]), but LRYGB ($14,366 [$6,410]) had a significantly lower treatment cost than rDBS ($29,951 [$4,490]; p < 0.0001). Therefore, for rDBS to be cost-effective compared with LRYGB, the multiple models yielded a success threshold range of 13.7 to 15.2 kg/m2 . CONCLUSIONS: This study established a preliminary efficacy success threshold for rDBS to be cost-effective for severe obesity, and results from randomized controlled trials are needed. This analysis allows for interpretation of the economic impact of advancing rDBS for obesity in light of ongoing trial results and suggests an attainable threshold is needed for cost-effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Deep Brain Stimulation , Gastric Bypass , Obesity, Morbid , Aged , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Gastrectomy/methods , Gastric Bypass/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Medicare , Obesity/etiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Treatment Outcome , United States
4.
Neuromodulation ; 24(2): 337-342, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599565

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the utility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) telemedicine in the management of patients with movement disorders from January 2019 to March 2020, covering the main period of the COVID-19 outbreak in China. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We obtained data from 40 hospitals around China that employed DBS tele-programming for their outpatients with Parkinson's disease or dystonia from January 2019 to March 2020. Data were obtained on the number and nature of patients' DBS health care service requests, reasons for their requests, the number of DBS telemedicine sessions subsequently completed, safety issues, and the patients' satisfaction with the DBS tele-programing parameter adjustments made. RESULTS: There were 909 DBS tele-programming health service requests (from 196 patients) completed during the study period. The results showed: 1) the number of DBS telemedicine sessions requested and the number of patients examined increased during the COVID-19 outbreak in February and March 2020 when compared with the monthly numbers in 2019; 2) the most common reason for the patients' health service requests was poor symptom control; 3) the most common DBS tele-programming adjustment made was voltage change; 4) overall, most (89%) DBS tele-programming adjustment sessions were experienced by the patients as satisfactory; and 5) significant adverse events and unexpected treatment interruptions caused by connection failure or other hardware- or software-related problems did not occur. CONCLUSIONS: DBS telemedicine could have a unique role to play in maintaining the delivery of DBS treatment and medical care to outpatients with movement disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Movement Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care , China , Deep Brain Stimulation/adverse effects , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
6.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 92: 41-45, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led to the canceling of elective surgeries throughout most of the USA and Canada. OBJECTIVE: This survey was carried out on behalf of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to understand the impact of the shutdown on deep brain stimulation (DBS) practices in North America. METHODS: A survey was distributed through RedCap® to the members of the PSG Functional Neurosurgical Working Group. Only one member from each site was asked to respond to the survey. Responses were collected from May 15 to June 6, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-three sites participated; 19 (83%) sites were from the USA and 4 (17%) from Canada. Twenty-one sites were academic medical centers. COVID-19 associated DBS restrictions were in place from 4 to 16 weeks. One-third of sites halted preoperative evaluations, while two-thirds of the sites offered limited preoperative evaluations. Institutional policy was the main contributor for the reported practice changes, with 87% of the sites additionally reporting patient-driven surgical delays secondary to pandemic concerns. Pre-post DBS associated management changes affected preoperative assessments 96%; electrode placement 87%; new implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement 83%; IPG replacement 65%; immediate postoperative DBS programming 74%; and routine DBS programming 91%. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic related shutdown resulted in DBS practice changes in almost all North American sites who responded to this large survey. Information learned could inform development of future contingency plans to reduce patient delays in care under similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Implantable Neurostimulators/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Canada , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/statistics & numerical data , United States
9.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 89: 199-205, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300965

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine in the management of chronic neurological conditions including movement disorders has expanded over time. In addition to enabling remote access to specialized care, telemedicine has also been shown to reduce caregiver burden and to improve patient satisfaction. With the COVID-19 pandemic, implementation of telehealth for patients with movement disorders, particularly those with more severe mobility issues, has increased rapidly. Although telemedicine care has been shown to be effective for patients with various movement disorders, its utilization for patients with device aided therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) is limited due to challenges related to adjusting these devices remotely and to the lack of consensus recommendations for using telemedicine in this patient population. Thus, guidelines for telemedicine and DBS will assist clinicians on the appropriate implementation of telemedicine to provide care to DBS patients. Optimizing the use of telemedicine for DBS will expand this type of therapy to remote locations with limited access to programming expertise, and also reduce the need for patient travel. Telemedicine is particularly important during the ongoing pandemic due to infection risk and limited access to clinic visits. In this article we review the currently available and emerging strategies for telemedicine and remote care for DBS. We then outline common principles and recommendations for telemedicine care in patients with DBS, review patient selection and best practices. Finally, we briefly discuss the current state of reimbursement for DBS telemedicine visits.


Subject(s)
Deep Brain Stimulation/trends , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/standards , Humans , Pandemics , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine/standards
11.
Neurol Neurochir Pol ; 55(4): 346-350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy for Parkinson's Disease (PD) and dystonia is associated with the possibility of both minor and major complications. One possible side effect is the depletion of implantable pulse generator (IPG) battery and the associated sudden recurrence of PD or dystonia symptoms, which can be potentially life-threatening. Delayed or postponed outpatient visits due to COVID -19 may be a risk factor of battery end-of-life consequences. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical outcomes in reported PD and dystonia patients treated with DBS, who, as a result of the sudden depletion of the neurostimulator battery, developed life-threatening symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The databases of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched using pre-established criteria. RESULTS: A total of 244 articles was found, of which 12 met the adopted criteria. Selected papers presented a total of 17 case reports of DBS-treated patients - 11 with PD, and six with dystonia - who had depleted IPG batteries and due to rapid worsening of PD/dystonia symptoms required urgent hospital admission. IPG battery replacement was the only effective treatment in the majority of cases. CONCLUSIONS: IPG battery depletion can result in fatal outcomes. Sudden recurrence of PD or dystonia symptoms in patients treated by DBS can be potentially life-threatening, so scheduling the replacement of a discharged IPG battery should not be postponed. The COVID-19 pandemic should alert staff at emergency, neurology and movement disorders wards not to postpone the visits of patients with an implanted DBS system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation , Dystonia , Parkinson Disease , Dystonia/therapy , Electrodes, Implanted , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 36(1): 72-84, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242081

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveNeuropsychological assessment is integral to the pre-surgical deep brain stimulation (DBS) workup for patients with movement disorders. The COVID-19 pandemic quickly affected care access and shifted healthcare delivery, and neuropsychology has adapted successfully to provide tele-neuropsychological (teleNP) DBS evaluations during this time, thus permanently changing the landscape of neuropsychological practice. Method: In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned from the pandemic and we offer care management guidelines for teleNP and in-person evaluations of pre-DBS populations, with exploration of the feasibility of the different approaches for uninterrupted care access. Results: We summarize the strengths and weaknesses of these care models and we provide future directions for the state of clinical neuropsychological practice for DBS programs, with implications for broader patient populations. Conclusions: A better understanding of these dynamics will inform and educate the DBS team and community regarding the complexities of performing DBS neuropsychological evaluations during COVID-19 and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation , Telemedicine , Humans , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 86: 135-138, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230072

ABSTRACT

The evaluation and management of patients with movement disorders has evolved considerably due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the assessment of candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. Members of the Neuropsychology Focus Group from the Parkinson Study Group Functional Neurosurgical Working Group met virtually to discuss current practices and solutions, build consensus, and to inform the DBS team and community regarding the complexities of performing DBS neuropsychological evaluations during COVID-19. It is our viewpoint that the practice of neuropsychology has adapted successfully to provide tele-neuropsychological pre-DBS evaluations during the global pandemic, thus permanently changing the landscape of neuropsychological services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/trends , Movement Disorders/psychology , Movement Disorders/surgery , Neuropsychological Tests , Neuropsychology/trends , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Parkinson Disease/surgery , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Telemedicine
15.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e282-e293, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009939

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has recommended the temporary cessation of all elective surgeries. The effects on patients' interest of elective neurosurgical procedures are currently unexplored. METHODS: Using Google Trends, search terms of 7 different neurosurgical procedure categories (trauma, spine, tumor, movement disorder, epilepsy, endovascular, and miscellaneous) were assessed in terms of relative search volume (RSV) between January 2015 and September 2020. Analyses of search terms were performed for over the short term (February 18, 2020, to April 18, 2020), intermediate term (January 1, 2020, to May 31, 2020), and long term (January 2015 to September 2020). State-level interest during phase I reopening (April 28, 2020, to May 31, 2020) was also evaluated. RESULTS: In the short term, RSVs of 4 categories (epilepsy, movement disorder, spine, and tumor) were significantly lower in the post-CMS announcement period. In the intermediate term, RSVs of 5 categories (miscellaneous, epilepsy, movement disorder, spine, and tumor) were significantly lower in the post-CMS announcement period. In the long term, RSVs of nearly all categories (endovascular, epilepsy, miscellaneous, movement disorder, spine, and tumor) were significantly lower in the post-CMS announcement period. Only the movement disorder procedure category had significantly higher RSV in states that reopened early. CONCLUSIONS: With the recommendation for cessation of elective surgeries, patient interests in overall elective neurosurgical procedures have dropped significantly. With gradual reopening, there has been a resurgence in some procedure types. Google Trends has proven to be a useful tracker of patient interest and may be used by neurosurgical departments to facilitate outreach strategies.


Subject(s)
Elective Surgical Procedures , Information Seeking Behavior , Internet , Neurosurgical Procedures , Search Engine , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/surgery , Craniocerebral Trauma/surgery , Deep Brain Stimulation , Endovascular Procedures , Epilepsy/surgery , Humans , Movement Disorders/therapy , Prosthesis Implantation , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Diseases/surgery
16.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E11, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953947

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has considerably affected the delivery of postoperative care to patients who have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. DBS teleprogramming technology was developed and deployed in China before the COVID-19 outbreak. In this report, the authors share their experiences with telemedical DBS treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: Four patients (2 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, 1 with major depressive disorder, and 1 with anorexia nervosa) underwent DBS surgery at Ruijin Hospital and received continuous postoperative DBS telemedicine case management from January 2020 to July 2020. DBS teleprogramming, individualized psychological support, and medical consultations were provided via the authors' DBS telemedicine platform, which also incorporated a synchronous real-time video communication system. RESULTS: Forty-five DBS telemedicine sessions were conducted; there was no unexpected loss of network connection during the sessions. Of these, 28 sessions involved DBS teleprogramming. Adjustments were made to the stimulation voltage, frequency, pulse width, and contact site in 21, 12, 9, and 9 sessions, respectively. Psychological support and troubleshooting were provided during the remaining telemedicine sessions. Modest to substantial clinical improvements after DBS surgery were observed in some but not all patients, whereas stimulation-related side effects were reported by 2 patients and included reversible sleep and mood problems, headache, and a sensation of heat. CONCLUSIONS: DBS telemedicine seems to offer a feasible, safe, and efficient strategy for maintaining the delivery of medical care to psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 outbreak. The authors propose that implementation of a comprehensive DBS telemedicine system, which combines DBS teleprogramming with psychological counseling, medical consultations, and medication prescriptions and delivery, could be an efficient and effective approach to manage the mental health and quality of life of patients with psychiatric disorders during future local or global public health crises.


Subject(s)
Anorexia Nervosa/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Depressive Disorder, Major/surgery , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/surgery , Telemedicine/methods , Anorexia Nervosa/diagnosis , Anorexia Nervosa/psychology , Deep Brain Stimulation/standards , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Mental Disorders , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Treatment Outcome
18.
Neuromodulation ; 24(2): 331-336, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917754

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established therapy for the management of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. Patients implanted with DBS require life-long management of the medical device as well as medications. Patients are often challenged to frequently visit the specialized DBS centers and such challenges are aggravated depending on geography, socioeconomic factors, and support systems. We discuss the need for digital health solutions to overcome these barriers to better and safely take care of patients, especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of the literature was conducted for technology and logistics necessary in forming a digital health program. RESULTS: Digital health encounters can take place in both a synchronous and asynchronous manner. Factors involving patients include cognitive capacity, physical safety, physical capacity, connectivity, and technological security. Physician factors include examining the patient, system diagnostics, and adjusting stimulation or medications. Technology is focused on bridging the gap between patient and physician through integrating the DBS lead, implantable pulse generator (IPG), programmer, novel devices/applications to grade motor function, and teleconference modalities. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with Parkinson's disease, digital health has the potential to drastically change the landscape after DBS surgery. Furthermore, technology is fundamental in connectivity, diagnostic evaluation, and security in order to create stable and useful patient-focused care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , Humans
19.
J Neurol ; 268(4): 1295-1303, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-891907

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). On time follow-up and timely programing of symptoms are important measures to maintain the effectiveness of DBS. Due to the highly contagious nature of 2019-nCoV, patients were quarantined. With the help of Internet technologies, we continued to provide motor and non-motor symptom assessment and remote programming services for postsurgical PD-DBS patients during this extraordinary period. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on postsurgical PD-DBS patients who could not come to our hospital for programming due to the impact of the 2019-nCoV. The differences between the pre- and post-programming groups were analyzed. We designed a 5-level Likert rating scale to evaluate the effects and convenience of the remote programming and Internet self-evaluation procedures. RESULTS: Of the 36 patients engaged in the remote programming, 32 patients met the inclusion criteria. Four of the 32 patients set initiated stimulation parameters, and the other 28 patients had significant improvement in UPDRS-III. Nearly all the 28 patients were satisfied with the effect of the remote programming. Most of the patients were willing to use remote programming again. CONCLUSION: Remote programming based on the online evaluation of patient's symptoms can help improve motor symptoms of postsurgical DBS patients with PD during the quarantine period caused by 2019-nCoV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Neurosurgery ; 88(2): 349-355, 2021 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-855180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a standard of care treatment for multiple neurologic disorders. Although 3-tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the gold-standard modality for structural and functional imaging, most centers refrain from 3T imaging in patients with DBS devices in place because of safety concerns. 3T MRI could be used not only for structural imaging, but also for functional MRI to study the effects of DBS on neurocircuitry and optimize programming. OBJECTIVE: To use an anthropomorphic phantom design to perform temperature and voltage safety testing on an activated DBS device during 3T imaging. METHODS: An anthropomorphic 3D-printed human phantom was constructed and used to perform temperature and voltage testing on a DBS device during 3T MRI. Based on the phantom assessment, a cohort study was conducted in which 6 human patients underwent MRI with their DBS device in an activated (ON) state. RESULTS: During the phantom study, temperature rises were under 2°C during all sequences, with the DBS in both the deactivated and activated states. Radiofrequency pulses from the MRI appeared to modulate the electrical discharge from the DBS, resulting in slight fluctuations of voltage amplitude. Six human subjects underwent MRI with their DBS in an activated state without any serious adverse events. One patient experienced stimulation-related side effects during T1-MPRAGE scanning with the DBS in an ON state because of radiofrequency-induced modulation of voltage amplitude. CONCLUSION: Following careful phantom-based safety testing, 3T structural and functional MRI can be safely performed in subjects with activated deep brain stimulators.


Subject(s)
Deep Brain Stimulation , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/adverse effects , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Phantoms, Imaging , Aged , Brain/physiology , Cohort Studies , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Electrodes, Implanted , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/instrumentation , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Printing, Three-Dimensional , Temperature
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