Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(4)2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784785

ABSTRACT

We present three cases who presented to the emergency department with severe complications of dental infections: Ludwig's angina, necrotising fasciitis and peritonsillar abscess. All of our cases presented at the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic, with complications of dental infections. They delayed their dental treatment due to the pandemic. The airway management was difficult in our cases. Their mortality risk increased due to complications. We aimed to draw attention to complicated odontogenic infections which are rarely seen in emergency department in the past, however started to show up increasingly particularly at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ludwig's Angina , Airway Management/adverse effects , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Humans , Ludwig's Angina/diagnosis , Pandemics
4.
Age Ageing ; 50(2): 317-325, 2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is little evidence about the utilisation of healthcare services and disease recognition in the older population, which was urged to self-isolate during the COVID-19 lockdown. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to describe the utilisation of physician consultations, specialist referrals, hospital admissions and the recognition of incident diseases in Germany for this age group during the COVID-19 lockdown. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: 1,095 general practitioners (GPs) and 960 specialist practices in Germany. SUBJECTS: 2.45 million older patients aged 65 or older. METHODS: The number of documented physician consultations, specialist referrals, hospital admissions and incident diagnoses during the imposed lockdown in 2020 was descriptively analysed and compared to 2019. RESULTS: Physician consultations decrease slightly in February (-2%), increase before the imposed lockdown in March (+9%) and decline in April (-18%) and May (-14%) 2020 compared to the same periods in 2019. Volumes of hospital admissions decrease earlier and more intensely than physician consultations (-39 versus -6%, respectively). Overall, 15, 16 and 18% fewer incident diagnoses were documented by GPs, neurologists and diabetologists, respectively, in 2020. Diabetes, dementia, depression, cancer and stroke were diagnosed less frequently during the lockdown (-17 to -26%), meaning that the decrease in the recognition of diseases was greater than the decrease in physician consultations. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that organisational changes were adopted quickly by practice management but also raise concerns about the maintenance of routine care. Prospective studies should evaluate the long-term effects of lockdowns on patient-related outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care , Noncommunicable Diseases , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(2): 1608-1619, 2020 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify potential risk factors for severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and establish a prediction model based on significant factors. METHODS: A total of 370 patients with COVID-19 were consecutively enrolled at The Third People's Hospital of Yichang from January to March 2020. COVID-19 was diagnosed according to the COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment plan released by the National Health and Health Committee of China. Effect-size estimates are summarized as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: 326 patients were diagnosed with mild or ordinary COVID-19, and 44 with severe or critical COVID-19. After propensity score matching and statistical adjustment, eight factors were significantly associated with severe or critical COVID-19 (p <0.05) relative to mild or ordinary COVID-19. Due to strong pairwise correlations, only five factors, including diagnostic delay (OR, 95% CI, p: 1.08, 1.02 to 1.17, 0.048), albumin (0.82, 0.75 to 0.91, <0.001), lactate dehydrogenase (1.56, 1.14 to 2.13, 0.011), white blood cell (1.27, 1.08 to 1.50, 0.004), and neutrophil (1.40, 1.16 to 1.70, <0.001), were retained for model construction and performance assessment. The nomogram model based on the five factors had good prediction capability and accuracy (C-index: 90.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide evidence for the significant contribution of five independent factors to the risk of severe or critical COVID-19, and their prediction was reinforced in a nomogram model.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19 , Aged , China , Critical Illness , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Female , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Nomograms , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin/analysis
6.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(1): 248-254, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has led surgical societies to recommend delaying diagnosis and treatment of suspected lung cancer for lesions less than 2 cm. Delaying diagnosis can lead to disease progression, but the impact of this delay on mortality is unknown. The COVID-19 infection rate at which immediate operative risk exceeds benefit is unknown. We sought to model immediate versus delayed surgical resection in a suspicious lung nodule less than 2 cm. METHODS: A decision analysis model was developed, and sensitivity analyses performed. The base case was a 65-year-old male smoker with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presenting for surgical biopsy of a 1.5 to 2 cm lung nodule highly suspicious for cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. We compared immediate surgical resection to delayed resection after 3 months. The likelihood of key outcomes was derived from the literature where available. The outcome was 5-year overall survival. RESULTS: Immediate surgical resection resulted in a similar but slightly higher 5-year overall survival when compared with delayed resection (0.77 versus 0.74) owing to the risk of disease progression. However, if the probability of acquired COVID-19 infection is greater than 13%, delayed resection is favorable (0.74 vs 0.73). CONCLUSIONS: Immediate surgical biopsy of lung nodules suspicious for cancer in hospitals with low COVID-19 prevalence likely results in improved 5-year survival. However, as the risk of perioperative COVID-19 infection increases above 13%, a delayed approach has similar or improved survival. This balance should be frequently reexamined at each health care facility throughout the curve of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Delayed Diagnosis/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/etiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Computer Simulation , Decision Support Techniques , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/etiology , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Risk , Smoking/adverse effects , Time Factors
7.
J Hosp Infect ; 106(4): 663-672, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sudden increase in COVID-19 admissions in hospitals during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic of 2020 led to onward transmissions among vulnerable inpatients. AIMS: This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical outcomes of healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections (HA-COVID-19) during the 2020 epidemic and study factors which may promote or correlate with its incidence and transmission in a Teaching Hospital NHS Trust in London, UK. METHODS: Electronic laboratory, patient and staff self-reported sickness records were interrogated from 1st March to 18th April 2020. HA-COVID-19 was defined as COVID-19 with symptom onset within >14 days of admission. Test performance of a single combined throat and nose swab (CTNS) for patient placement was calculated. The effect of delayed RNA positivity (DRP, defined as >48 h delay), staff self-reported COVID-19 sickness absence, hospital bed occupancy, and community incidence of COVID-19 was compared for HA-COVID-19. The incidence of other significant hospital-acquired bacterial infections (HAB) was compared with previous years. RESULTS: Fifty-eight HA-COVID-19 (7.1%) cases were identified. When compared with community-acquired admitted cases (CA-COVID-19), significant differences were observed in age (P=0.018), ethnicity (P<0.001) and comorbidity burden (P<0.001) but not in 30-day mortality. CTNS-negative predictive value was 60.3%. DRP was associated with greater mortality (P=0.034) and incidence of HA-COVID-19 correlated positively with DRP (R = 0.7108) and staff sickness absence (R = 0.7815). For the study period HAB rates were similar to the previous 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Early diagnosis and isolation of COVID-19 patients would help to reduce transmission. A single CTNS has limited value in segregating patients into positive and negative pathways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Absenteeism , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Cross Infection/virology , Female , Global Burden of Disease/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , London/epidemiology , Male , Predictive Value of Tests , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Self Report
9.
Gut ; 70(6): 1053-1060, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733147

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) prioritisation to mitigate the impact of delays in the colorectal cancer (CRC) urgent diagnostic (2-week-wait (2WW)) pathway consequent from the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: We modelled the reduction in CRC survival and life years lost resultant from per-patient delays of 2-6 months in the 2WW pathway. We stratified by age group, individual-level benefit in CRC survival versus age-specific nosocomial COVID-19-related fatality per referred patient undergoing colonoscopy. We modelled mitigation strategies using thresholds of FIT triage of 2, 10 and 150 µg Hb/g to prioritise 2WW referrals for colonoscopy. To construct the underlying models, we employed 10-year net CRC survival for England 2008-2017, 2WW pathway CRC case and referral volumes and per-day-delay HRs generated from observational studies of diagnosis-to-treatment interval. RESULTS: Delay of 2/4/6 months across all 11 266 patients with CRC diagnosed per typical year via the 2WW pathway were estimated to result in 653/1419/2250 attributable deaths and loss of 9214/20 315/32 799 life years. Risk-benefit from urgent investigatory referral is particularly sensitive to nosocomial COVID-19 rates for patients aged >60. Prioritisation out of delay for the 18% of symptomatic referrals with FIT >10 µg Hb/g would avoid 89% of these deaths attributable to presentational/diagnostic delay while reducing immediate requirement for colonoscopy by >80%. CONCLUSIONS: Delays in the pathway to CRC diagnosis and treatment have potential to cause significant mortality and loss of life years. FIT triage of symptomatic patients in primary care could streamline access to colonoscopy, reduce delays for true-positive CRC cases and reduce nosocomial COVID-19 mortality in older true-negative 2WW referrals. However, this strategy offers benefit only in short-term rationalisation of limited endoscopy services: the appreciable false-negative rate of FIT in symptomatic patients means most colonoscopies will still be required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delayed Diagnosis , Occult Blood , Risk Assessment/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Colonoscopy/methods , Colonoscopy/standards , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/mortality , Critical Pathways , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Immunochemistry/methods , Infection Control/methods , Life Tables , Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Actas Dermosifiliogr (Engl Ed) ; 111(8): 629-638, 2020 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spain is in a situation of indefinite lockdown due to the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. One of the consequences of this lockdown is delays in medical and surgical procedures for common diseases. The aim of this study was to model the impact on survival of tumor growth caused by such delays in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study. We constructed an exponential growth model for both SCC and melanoma to estimate tumor growth between patient-reported onset and surgical excision at different time points. RESULTS: Data from 200 patients with SCC of the head and neck and 1000 patients with cutaneous melanoma were included. An exponential growth curve was calculated for each tumor type and we estimated tumor size after 1, 2, and 3 months of potential surgical delay. The proportion of patients with T3 SCC (diameter >4cm or thickness >6 mm) increased from 41.5% (83 patients) in the initial study group to an estimated 58.5%, 70.5%, and 72% after 1, 2, and 3 months of delay. Disease-specific survival at 2, 5, and 10 years in patients whose surgery was delayed by 3 months decreased by 6.2%, 8.2%, and 5.2%, respectively. The proportion of patients with ultrathick melanoma (>6 mm) increased from 6.9% in the initial study group to 21.9%, 30.2%, and 30.2% at 1, 2, and 3 months. Five- and 10-year disease-specific survival both decreased by 14.4% in patients treated after a potential delay of 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of adequate diagnosis and treatment of SCC and melanoma in the current lockdown situation in Spain, we can expect to see to a considerable increase in large and thick SCCs and melanomas. Efforts must be taken to encourage self-examination and facilitate access to dermatologists in order to prevent further delays.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Melanoma/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Tumor Burden , Age Factors , Algorithms , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/mortality , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Melanoma/mortality , Pandemics , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Skin Neoplasms/mortality , Spain/epidemiology , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL