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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613817

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in changes in healthcare use. This study aimed to identify factors associated with a patient's decision to avoid and/or delay healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. We used data from a community-based survey in Portugal from July 2020 to August 2021, "COVID-19 Barometer: Social Opinion", which included data regarding health services use, risk perception and confidence in health services. We framed our analysis under Andersen's Behavioural Model of Health Services Use and utilised Poisson regression to identify healthcare avoidance associated factors. Healthcare avoidance was high (44%). Higher prevalence of healthcare avoidance was found among women; participants who reported lower confidence in the healthcare system response to COVID-19 and non-COVID-19; lost income during the pandemic; experienced negative emotions due to physical distancing measures; answered the questionnaire before middle June 2021; and perceived having worse health, the measures implemented by the Government as inadequate, the information conveyed as unclear and confusing, a higher risk of getting COVID-19, a higher risk of complications and a higher risk of getting infected in a health institution. It is crucial to reassure the population that health services are safe. Health services should plan their recovery since delays in healthcare delivery can lead to increased or worsening morbidity, yielding economic and societal costs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613777

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, public health experts have faced the challenge of convincing people to change their everyday habits. This study aims to evaluate the impact of trust in medicine on Polish citizens' adherence to recommended behaviors. METHODS: An online survey was conducted on a quota sample of adult Poles (n = 1072) during the second wave of COVID-19. RESULTS: The trust-in-medicine index was created from statements relating to trust in healthcare professionals, vaccines, and medicines. This index showed that 27.1% of respondents expressed low trust, 36.7% expressed moderate trust, and 36.3% expressed high trust. The recommended behavior index was created from nine statements. This index showed that 15.8% of respondents had low adherence, 38.2% had moderate adherence, and 46.0% had high adherence to the healthcare experts' recommendations. One-way analysis of variance showed that people with a high trust had significantly higher scores on the recommended behavior index when compared to people with a moderate or low trust. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that those responsible for health policy should put more effort into building trust not only in health professionals, but also in pharmaceutical companies. We also determined the socio-demographic features of people to whom such actions of trust building should be directed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Trust
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613759

ABSTRACT

Social distancing measures imposed because of the COVID-19 pandemic presented challenges to the health and wellbeing of people with dementia, family carers, and healthcare professionals. This study investigated the impact of these measures on all involved in the care for people with dementia. For this qualitative study, 20 family carers and 20 healthcare professionals from home care and long-term care (LTC) participated in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. For people with dementia, the social distancing measures resulted in a deterioration of physical health. The impact on their emotional state and behaviour depended on the stage of dementia. Family carers experienced difficulty coping with visiting restrictions, anxiety regarding safety, and changes in carer burden. Healthcare professionals had an increased workload, and felt guilty about adhering to restrictive measures. Differences between home care and LTC were reported (i.e., societal initiatives focussed on LTC, scarcity of activities for community-dwelling people with dementia, use of personal protective equipment more intrusive for home care). The social distancing measures had a negative impact on persons with dementia, their family carers, and healthcare professionals. More attention is needed for community-dwelling people with dementia and family carers in times of social isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Delivery of Health Care , Dementia/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e056599, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613011

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic forced hospital organisation and healthcare professionals to prepare for large quantities of patients in isolation rooms. In situ simulation may seem promising in order to manage the organisational changes that the pandemic require. This study aims to investigate in situ simulations influence on healthcare professional's self-perceived preparedness to face the pandemic. DESIGN: A qualitative focus group study. SETTING: We conducted full scale in situ simulations over a 3-week period in April 2020, including 277 healthcare professionals, at a Danish University Hospital. Subsequently, six semistructured focus group interviews, including 22 participants from the simulations, were conducted in May 2020. PARTICIPANTS: 22 healthcare professionals participated in the focus group interviews. METHODS: The simulations consisted of a briefing, two scenarios focusing on acute respiratory insufficiency and correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and a debriefing. We conducted six focus group interviews using comparable semistructured interview guides focusing on the organisational restructuring of the departments and outcomes of the needs-driven simulation-based programme. We used thematic analysis to identify main themes. RESULTS: The informants perceived that the simulations resulted in positive experiences for the healthcare professionals and perceived the organisational changes as effective. They highlighted that simulation enhanced teamwork, demystified the COVID-19 disease, and improved skills, in correct use of PPE and acute treatment of COVID-19 patients. Data revealed that a predefined simulation task force including both experienced simulators and medical experts for facilitation of in situ simulation would be beneficial. CONCLUSION: In situ simulation may be useful to enhance learning on organisation and individual level during a pandemic. This educational activity could serve an important role in facilitating hospital preparation and education of large numbers of healthcare professionals during a healthcare crisis. Introduction of a simulation task force is suggested to handle coordination and rapid enrolment across the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Delivery of Health Care , Denmark , Focus Groups , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(1): 6-9, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604008

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify rates of work absence following receipt of COVID-19 vaccine in a cohort of healthcare personnel (HCP). METHODS: Short-term disability (STD) usage by HCP attributed to side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine was calculated for each vaccine manufacturer, job category, age group, and work region. Analysis was performed for the cohort of HCP during the initial vaccination campaign. RESULTS: 4.1% of COVID-19 vaccinations generated a STD claim for lost work due to side effects, with increased STD rates after dose 2 than dose 1 (7.4% and 0.9%, respectively). Rates were higher for younger HCP and allied health staff. CONCLUSIONS: While side effects from mRNA vaccine dose 2 resulted in more work absence, statistically significant geographic differences in STD suggest cultural and staffing factors may impact HCP to utilize STD following vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic
7.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 38(1): 49-61, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608057

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has produced an abundance of new and evolving evidence related to providing care for this complex patient population. Keeping up with the rapid flow of published information can be challenging and time-consuming, even for those skilled at interpreting the literature. To help clinical nurses readily apply standardized, evidence-based recommendations in a rapidly changing healthcare environment, the Good Samaritan Medical Center Education Team created a nursing-specific guideline for care of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 45(1): 13-21, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607874

ABSTRACT

The aim of this article is to identify quality improvement nursing strategies that have been implemented to safeguard COVID-19 patients from harm while being cared for in the intensive care unit (ICU). This article incorporates a literature review on the experiences of nurses working at a large urban teaching hospital in the areas of critical care, quality, safety, and regulatory. As leaders in the delivery of health care, nurses have always pioneered innovative ways to deliver care despite difficult circumstances. COVID-19 is a novel viral disease with many unknowns, and it required nurses to integrate innovative approaches with evidence-based practice in order to meet the needs of the patient and to ensure patient safety. While in the critical care setting, COVID-19 patients are at an increased risk for various hospital-acquired injuries, threats to personal safety, and decline in mental health. Through ingenuity and adaptability, successful nursing strategies have been identified in the delivery of quality, evidence-based nursing care to safeguard the vulnerable COVID-19 patient population from harm while in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
9.
IEEE Pulse ; 12(6): 19-22, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607461

ABSTRACT

Health care workers were already stressed before the pandemic. Now, deep into the second year of COVID-19, many find their mental health sliding even further. In the USA, some have had to care for desperately ill but recalcitrant patients who had access to a vaccine but refused to take it. Others, in both the USA and around the world, are working in hospitals, especially rural ones, which are perilously short-staffed [1].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Psychological , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142354, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604496

ABSTRACT

Importance: Deferred diabetic foot screening and delays in timely care of acute foot complications during the COVID-19 pandemic may have contributed to an increase in limb loss. Objective: To evaluate the association of the COVID-19 pandemic with diabetes-related care measures, foot complications, and amputation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study included all adult residents of Ontario, Canada, with diabetes and compared the rates of selected outcomes from January 1, 2020, to February 23, 2021, vs January 1, 2019, to February 23, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Comprehensive in-person diabetes care assessment, including foot examination; hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement; emergency department visit or hospitalization for diabetic foot ulceration, osteomyelitis, or gangrene; lower extremity open or endovascular revascularization; minor (toe or partial-foot) amputation; and major (above-ankle) leg amputation. Rates and rate ratios (RRs) comparing 2020-2021 vs 2019-2020 for each measure were calculated for 10-week periods, anchored relative to onset of the pandemic on March 11, 2020 (11th week of 2020). Results: On March 11, 2020, the study included 1 488 605 adults with diabetes (median [IQR] age, 65 [55-74] years; 776 665 [52.2%] men), and on March 11, 2019, the study included 1 441 029 adults with diabetes (median [IQR] age, 65 [55-74] years; 751 459 [52.1%] men). After the onset of the pandemic, rates of major amputation in 2020-2021 decreased compared with 2019-2020 levels. The RR for the prepandemic period from January 1 to March 10 was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.88-1.25), with RRs in the pandemic periods ranging from 0.86 (95% CI, 0.72-1.03) in May 20 to July 28 to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.80-1.13) in October 7 to December 15. There were no consistent differences in demographic characteristics or comorbidities of patients undergoing amputation in the 2020-2021 vs 2019-2020 periods. Rates of comprehensive in-person diabetes care assessment and HbA1c measurement declined sharply and remained below 2019-2020 levels (eg, in-person assessment, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.28-0.28). The rates of emergency department visits (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.61-0.75), hospitalization (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68-0.87), open revascularization (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56-0.79), endovascular revascularization (March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.61-0.81), and minor amputation (March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60-0.83) initially dropped but recovered to 2019-2020 levels over the study period. Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study, disruptions in care related to the COVID-19 pandemic were not associated with excess leg amputations among people living with diabetes. As the pandemic ends, improved prevention and treatment of diabetic foot complications will be necessary to maintain these positive results.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Foot/pathology , Foot/surgery , Glycated Hemoglobin A , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Physical Examination , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Surgical Procedures
11.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 287: 73-77, 2021 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594908

ABSTRACT

Adopting international standards within health research communities can elevate data FAIRness and widen analysis possibilities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mapping feasibility against HL7® Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources® (FHIR)® of a generic metadata schema (MDS) created for a central search hub gathering COVID-19 health research (studies, questionnaires, documents = MDS resource types). Mapping results were rated by calculating the percentage of FHIR coverage. Among 86 items to map, total mapping coverage was 94%: 50 (58%) of the items were available as standard resources in FHIR and 31 (36%) could be mapped using extensions. Five items (6%) could not be mapped to FHIR. Analyzing each MDS resource type, there was a total mapping coverage of 93% for studies and 95% for questionnaires and documents, with 61% of the MDS items available as standard resources in FHIR for studies, 57% for questionnaires and 52% for documents. Extensions in studies, questionnaires and documents were used in 32%, 38% and 43% of items, respectively. This work shows that FHIR can be used as a standardized format in registries for clinical, epidemiological and public health research. However, further adjustments to the initial MDS are recommended - and two additional items even needed when implementing FHIR. Developing a MDS based on the FHIR standard could be a future approach to reduce data ambiguity and foster interoperability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metadata , Delivery of Health Care , Electronic Health Records , Health Level Seven , Humans , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211014093, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593984

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented in recent history as radically and forcefully changing healthcare delivery. Practice facilitators, who often use tools of improvement science, have long played a critical role in supporting routine primary care practice transformation when healthcare system and policy changes occur. However, current events have taken many healthcare systems to the brink of collapse. Our practice facilitation team, which has a long history of sustained primary care partnerships in rural under-resourced settings, is finding creative solutions to carry forward work in research and quality improvement, and the tools of improvement science are well-suited to address rapidly changing demands of primary care during such a crisis. We reflect here on practice facilitation through the pandemic-the value of applied improvement science, and the critical necessity of strong relationships, flexibility, and creativity to support ongoing primary care partnerships.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 9(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596607

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether children receiving immunosuppressive therapies for neuroimmunologic disorders had (1) increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV2 infection or to develop more severe forms of COVID-19; (2) increased relapses or autoimmune complications if infected; and (3) changes in health care delivery during the pandemic. METHODS: Patients with and without immunosuppressive treatment were recruited to participate in a retrospective survey evaluating the period from March 14, 2020, to March 30, 2021. Demographics, clinical features, type of immunosuppressive treatment, suspected or confirmed COVID-19 in the patients or cohabitants, and changes in care delivery were recorded. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-three children were included: 84 (55%) female, median age 13 years (interquartile range [8-16] years), 79 (52%) on immunosuppressive treatment. COVID-19 was suspected or confirmed in 17 (11%) (all mild), with a frequency similar in patients with and without immunosuppressive treatment (11/79 [14%] vs 6/74 [8%], p = 0.3085). The frequency of neurologic relapses was similar in patients with (18%) and without (21%) COVID-19. Factors associated with COVID-19 included having cohabitants with COVID-19 (p < 0.001) and lower blood levels of vitamin D (p = 0.039). Return to face-to-face schooling or mask type did not influence the risk of infection, although 43(28%) children had contact with a classmate with COVID-19. Clinic visits changed from face to face to remote for 120 (79%) patients; 110 (92%) were satisfied with the change. DISCUSSION: In this cohort of children with neuroimmunologic disorders, the frequency of COVID-19 was low and not affected by immunosuppressive therapies. The main risk factors for developing COVID-19 were having cohabitants with COVID-19 and low vitamin D levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Nervous System Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Child , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Masks/virology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Pandemics , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Vitamin D/blood
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2141233, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596574

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of alternative care modalities (eg, teleconsultations and task shifting) that will continue to be implemented in parallel to traditional care after the pandemic. An ideal balance between alternative and traditional care modalities is unknown. Objectives: To quantify the ideal postpandemic balance between alternative and traditional care modalities among patients with chronic illness and to qualify the circumstances in which patients consider it appropriate to replace traditional care with alternative care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study invited 5999 adults with chronic illness in ComPaRe, a French nationwide e-cohort of adults with chronic conditions who volunteer their time to participate in research projects, to participate in this study, which was performed from January 27 to February 23, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: Participants rated the ideal proportion at which they would use 3 alternative care modalities instead of the traditional care equivalent on a 0% to 100% scale (with 0% indicating using alternative care modalities for none of one's future care and 100% indicating using alternative care modalities for all of one's future care) of their overall future care: (1) teleconsultations, (2) online symptom-checkers to react to new symptoms, and (3) remote monitoring to adapt treatment outside consultations. The median ideal proportion of alternative care use was calculated. Perceived appropriate circumstances in which each alternative modality could replace traditional care were collected with open-ended questions. Analyses were performed on a weighted data set representative of patients with chronic illness in France. Results: Of the 5999 invited individuals, 1529 (mean [SD] age, 50.3 [14.7] years; 1072 [70.1%] female) agreed to participate (participation rate, 25.5%). Participants would choose teleconsultations for 50.0% of their future consultations (IQR, 11.0%-52.0%), online symptom-checkers over contacting their physician for 22.0% of new symptoms (IQR, 2.0%-50.0%), and remote monitoring instead of consultations for 52.3% of their treatment adaptations (IQR, 25.4%-85.4%). Participants reported 67 circumstances for which replacing traditional with alternative care modalities was considered appropriate, including 31 care activities (eg, prescription renewal and addressing acute or minor complaints), 25 patient characteristics (eg, stable chronic condition and established patient-physician relationship), and 11 required characteristics of the alternative care modalities (eg, quality assurance). Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this survey study suggest that after the pandemic, patients would choose alternative over traditional care for 22% to 52% of the time across different care needs. Participants proposed 67 criteria to guide clinicians in replacing traditional care with alternative care. These findings provide a guide for redesigning care in collaboration with patients after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Adult , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
15.
Med Lav ; 112(6): 465-476, 2021 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592447

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A prospective observational study involved 13,787 Health Care Workers (HCWs) of a large hospital to assess the effectiveness of a SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine. METHODS: The daily incidence of infections was estimated from 1st October 2020 to 30th April 2021 and compared with that of the province of Turin (2.26 million). In the middle of this period, a mass vaccination began among HCW, and its effect was assessed. RESULTS: In the first half-period, 1,163 positive HCWs were observed, the average daily incidence rate per 100,000 being 79.58 (± 15.58; 95% CI) compared to 38.54 (± 5.96; 95% CI) in the general population (p<0.001). The vaccination campaign immunized 9,843 HCWs; among them, the average daily incidence was 14.23 (± 2.73; 95% CI) compared to 34.2 (± 2.95; 95% CI) in the province (p<0.001). Among fully vaccinated HCW, 59 cases were observed, giving rise to an incidence of 6.3 (± 2.66; 95% CI) much lower than in the province (p<0.001). In the second half of the observation period, the RR for HCWs compared to the province dropped from 2.07 (1.96 - 2.18; 95% CI; p<0.001) to 0.5 (0.42 - 0.58; 95% CI; p<0.001) and to 0.17 (0.13 - 0.22; 95% CI; p<0.001) for unvaccinated and vaccinated HCWs, respectively. The RR of vaccinate HCW was 0.43 (0.31 - 0.58; 95% CI; p<0.001) compared to unvaccinated. In the second half of the observation period, unvaccinated HCWs had a RR of 0.21 (0.18 - 0.25; 95% CI; p<0.001) as compared to the first one. A linear regression model (R2 = 0.87) showed that every percent increase in vaccinated HCWs lowered daily incidence by 0.94 (0.86 - 1.02; IC 95%; p<0.001). Vaccinated HCWs had a RR of 0.09 (0.07 - 0.12; 95% CI; p<0.001) compared to unvaccinated HCWs, which led to estimated effectiveness of the two-dose vaccine of 91 % (± 3 %; CI 95%) similar to that reported by the manufacturer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic , Workforce
17.
Front Public Health ; 9: 765501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591734

ABSTRACT

Introduction: During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic there have been much publicised shortages in Personal Protective Equipment for frontline health care workers, from masks to gowns. Recent previous airborne pandemics provide an opportunity to learn how to effectively lead and manage supply chains during crisis situations. Identifying and plotting this learning against time will reveal what has been learnt, when and, significantly, what can be learnt for the future. Aims: (i) To identify the temporal trajectory of leadership and management learning in health supply chain management through pandemics and (ii) to identify leadership and management lessons to enable the resilient supply of key items such as PPE in future pandemics. Methods: We undertook a scoping review in line with PRISMA (scoping review extension) searching Business Source Premier, Health Business Elite, Medline, ProQuest Business Collection and PubMed. Search terms were focused on recent airborne pandemics (SARS; Ebola; Zika virus; H1N1 swine flu, COVID-19), supply chain management, PPE, leadership, learning, inhibitors and facilitators and resilience e.g., SARS AND supply chain* AND ("personal protective equipment" OR PPE) (leaders* OR manage*) Titles and abstracts were downloaded to Endnote and duplicates removed. Two authors independently screened all of the titles and abstracts. Inclusion criteria focused on leadership and management in health supply chains during pandemics, peer reviewed or grey literature (either from business journals or reports): exclusion criteria included not in English and not focused on a named pandemic. Once interrater reliability was assured, authors completed a title and abstract screening independently. Ten percent of the resultant full text articles were screened by both authors, once agreement was reached the full text articles were screened independently noting reasons for exclusion. A data extraction tool was designed to capture findings from the final articles included in the review. Results/Discussion: We found 92 articles and, after screening, included 30 full text articles. The majority were focused on COVID-19 (N = 27) and most were from the USA (N = 13). We identified four themes related to leadership and management of pandemic PPE supply chains, (i) Leadership and management learning for pandemic PPE supply chain management, (ii) Inhibitors of PPE supply chain resilience during a pandemic, (iii) Facilitators employed to manage the immediate impacts of PPE supply chain demands during a pandemic,and (iv) Facilitators proposed to ensure longer term resilience of PPE supply chains during pandemics Our study suggests there has been limited leadership and management learning for PPE supply chains from previous pandemics, however there has been extensive learning through the COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons included the importance of planning, the significance of collaboration and relationship building. Resilience of PPE supply chains was reported to be dependent on multiple levels from individuals to organisation level and also interdependent on (i) sustainability, (ii) the practise of PPE and (iii) long term environmental impact of PPE suggesting the need, long term, to move to a circular economy approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Animals , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Swine
18.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261524, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591594

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the health systems in many ways. It has put unprecedented strain on health systems worldwide and exposed gaps in public health infrastructure. A health system comprises all institutions and resources working towards improving and maintaining health. Among the different aspects of health system strengthening, a patient's experiences and expectations play a crucial role in determining how well the health facilities function. This study aims to explore health system strengthening's implications based on experiences and feedback provided by COVID-19 patients admitted to a government tropical and infectious disease hospital in Nepal. METHODS: In this qualitative study, we collected the voluntary handwritten feedback by the admitted COVID-19 patients to document the feedback and experiences from a book, maintained by the hospital. We performed thematic content analysis using the World Health Organization's six building blocks of health system as a theoretical framework which included service delivery, health workforce, information, leadership and governance, financing, and access to medicines. RESULTS: Most patients in this study had positive experiences on service delivery and health workforce. Some also highlighted the gaps in infrastructure, cleanliness, and hygiene. Many suggested positive experiences on other dimensions of the health system such as financing, governance and leadership, and access to medicines reflected upon by the patients' thankfulness to the hospital and the government for the treatment they received. The responses also reflected the inter-connectedness between the different building blocks of health system. CONCLUSION: This study approached a unique way to strengthen the health system by exploring patients' feedback, which suggested an overall positive impression on most building blocks of health system. However, it also highlighted certain gaps in infrastructure, cleanliness, and hygiene. It reinforces the hospital management and government's role to continue its efforts to strengthen the health system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Government Programs , Hospitals , Humans , Nepal/epidemiology , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9195965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591582

ABSTRACT

Since its outbreak, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused havoc on people's lives. All activities were paused due to the virus's spread across the continents. Researchers have been working hard to find new medication treatments for the COVID-19 pandemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that safety and self-measures play a major role in preventing the virus from spreading from one person to another. Wireless technology is playing a critical role in avoiding viral propagation. This technology mainly comprises of portable devices that assist self-isolated patients in adhering to safe precautionary measures. Government officials are currently using wireless technologies to identify infected people at large gatherings. In this research, we gave an overview of wireless technologies that assisted the general public and healthcare professionals in maintaining effective healthcare services during COVID-19. We also discussed the possible challenges faced by them for effective implementation in day-to-day life. In conclusion, wireless technologies are one of the best techniques in today's age to effectively combat the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Wireless Technology/trends , Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/psychology , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
20.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(6): 1059-1078, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591148

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has spread globally and infected millions of people, thereby restricting their movement. Quarantine hotels play an important role in protecting people from COVID-19 and contribute to a better quality of life. The objective of this study was to examine the role of quarantine hotels in providing improved quality of life through both medical and hospitality services under one roof to address the COVID-19 situation in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This study used a quantitative, cross-sectional research design. Data were collected from quarantine hotels in Saudi Arabia using a survey, and analyzed through Partial Least Square (PLS)-Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). RESULTS: Medical service quality, financial savings and convenience had a positive effect on people's attitudes and intention to use quarantine hotels. Similarly, attitude, intention, and hospitality products had a positive effect on health behavior, which favorably affected quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Medical service quality, financial savings, and convenience, as well as hospitality provided by quarantine hotels, have a positive role in promoting health behavior and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Health Behavior , Health Promotion , Humans , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
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