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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e059312, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788967

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify and prioritise the research needed to help Nepali agencies develop an improved road safety system. DESIGN: Delphi study. SETTING: Nepal. PARTICIPANTS: Stakeholders from government institutions, academia, engineering, healthcare and civil society were interviewed to identify knowledge gaps and research questions. Participants then completed two rounds of ranking and a workshop. RESULTS: A total of 93 participants took part in interviews and two rounds of ranking. Participants were grouped with others sharing expertise relating to each of the five WHO 'pillars' of road safety: (1) road safety management; (2) safer roads; (3) safer vehicles; (4) safer road users and (5) effective postcrash response. Interviews yielded 1019 research suggestions across the five pillars. Two rounds of ranking within expert groups yielded consensus on the important questions for each pillar. A workshop involving all participants then led to the selection of 6 questions considered the most urgent: (1) How can implementing agencies be made more accountable? (2) How should different types of roads, and roads in different geographical locations, be designed to make them safer for all road users? (3) What vehicle fitness factors lead to road traffic crashes? (4) How can the driver licensing system be improved to ensure safer drivers? (5) What factors lead to public vehicle crashes and how can they be addressed? and (6) What factors affect emergency response services getting to the patient and then getting them to the right hospital in the best possible time? CONCLUSIONS: The application of the Delphi approach is useful to enable participants representing a range of institutions and expertise to contribute to the identification of road safety research priorities. Outcomes from this study provide Nepali researchers with a greater understanding of the necessary focus for future road safety research.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Delphi Technique , Humans , Licensure , Nepal , Research , Safety
2.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 12, 2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700769

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recognition of the role of structural, cultural, political and social determinants of health is increasing. A key principle of each of these is self-determination, and according to the United Nations (2007), this is a right of Indigenous Peoples. For First Nations Australians, opportunities to exercise this right appear to be limited. This paper explores First Nations Australian communities' responses to reducing alcohol-related harms and improving the health and well-being of their communities, with a focus on understanding perceptions and experiences of their self-determination. It is noted that while including First Nations Australians in policies is not in and of itself self-determination, recognition of this right in the processes of developing health and alcohol policies is a critical element. This study aims to identify expert opinion on what is needed for First Nations Australians' self-determination in the development of health- and alcohol-related policy. METHODS: This study used the Delphi technique to translate an expert panel's opinions into group consensus. Perspectives were sought from First Nations Australians (n = 9) and non-Indigenous Peoples (n = 11) with experience in developing, evaluating and/or advocating for alcohol interventions led by First Nations Australians. Using a web-based survey, this study employed three survey rounds to identify and then gain consensus regarding the elements required for First Nations Australians' self-determination in policy development. RESULTS: Twenty panellists (n = 9 First Nations Australian) participated in at least one of the three surveys. Following the qualitative round 1 survey, six main themes, 60 subthemes and six examples of policy were identified for ranking in round 2. In round 2, consensus was reached with 67% of elements (n = 40/60). Elements that did not reach consensus were repeated in round 3, with additional elements (n = 5). Overall, consensus was reached on two thirds of elements (66%, n = 43/65). CONCLUSIONS: Self-determination is complex, with different meaning in each context. Despite some evidence of self-determination, systemic change in many areas is needed, including in government. This study has identified a starting point, with the identification of elements and structural changes necessary to facilitate First Nations Australian community-led policy development approaches, which are vital to ensuring self-determination.


Subject(s)
Public Policy , Australia , Delphi Technique , Humans , Personal Autonomy
3.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 12(1): 81-90, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691300

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Despite the escalating public health emergency related to opioid-related deaths in Canada and the USA, opioids are essential for palliative care (PC) symptom management.Opioid safety is the prevention, identification and management of opioid-related harms. The Delphi technique was used to develop expert consensus recommendations about how to promote opioid safety in adults receiving PC in Canada and the USA. METHODS: Through a Delphi process comprised of two rounds, USA and Canadian panellists in PC, addiction and pain medicine developed expert consensus recommendations. Elected Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians (CSPCP) board members then rated how important it is for PC physicians to be aware of each consensus recommendation.They also identified high-priority research areas from the topics that did not achieve consensus in Round 2. RESULTS: The panellists (Round 1, n=23; Round 2, n=22) developed a total of 130 recommendations from the two rounds about the following six opioid-safety related domains: (1) General principles; (2) Measures for healthcare institution and PC training and clinical programmes; (3) Patient and caregiver assessments; (4) Prescribing practices; (5) Monitoring; and (6) Patients and caregiver education. Fifty-nine topics did not achieve consensus and were deemed potential areas of research. From these results, CSPCP identified 43 high-priority recommendations and 8 high-priority research areas. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent guidance about opioid safety is needed to address the opioid crisis. These consensus recommendations can promote safer opioid use, while recognising the importance of these medications for PC symptom management.


Subject(s)
Analgesics, Opioid , Palliative Medicine , Adult , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Canada , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans
4.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30076, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687288

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Vaccines providing protection against COVID-19 are a core tool for ending the pandemic. Though international organisations created guidance in 2020 for vaccine deployment, this had to be adapted for each country's situation and values. We aimed to assist public health decision makers by identifying areas of consensus among Swiss experts for the deployment of one or more novel COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: An electronic, modified Delphi process between September and November 2020. We recruited a convenience sample of experts working in Switzerland from a variety of specialities, who completed two anonymous questionnaires. They voted on clarification questions and guidance statements from 0 (complete disagreement) to 10 (complete agreement). Responses for guidance statements with a median ≥8 and a lower inter-quartile range bound ≥7 were considered as reaching consensus. RESULTS: Sixty-five experts accepted (66% response rate), with 47 completing the first questionnaire (72%), and 48 the second (74%). Statements reaching consensus included: in the first phase we should vaccinate front-line healthcare professionals and people ≥65 years with risk factors; widespread vaccination of children and adolescents should not be an early priority; and vaccines should be provided free of charge in the setting of national or cantonal vaccination campaigns. Statements not reaching consensus included: early vaccination of people living with someone with risk factors who are not themselves at risk; vaccination of people with previous confirmed or suspected COVID-19; and whether vaccination should be mandatory for individuals with certain activities, such as front-line healthcare professionals. CONCLUSIONS: Experts reached consensus on several statements that were available for decision-makers when making key decisions for COVID-19 vaccine deployment in Switzerland. Statements without consensus highlighted areas requiring expert and public dialogue. The modified Delphi process allowed us to rapidly synthesise views from a broad panel of experts on sensitive topics, and could be considered for a broad range of issues during public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Delphi Technique , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
5.
Clin Nutr ; 41(3): 661-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Remote Malnutrition Application (R-MAPP) was developed during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide support for health care professionals (HCPs) working in the community to complete remote nutritional assessments, and provide practical guidance for nutritional care. The aim of this study was to modify the R-MAPP into a version suitable for children, Pediatric Remote Malnutrition Application (Pedi-R-MAPP), and provide a structured approach to completing a nutrition focused assessment as part of a technology enabled care service (TECS) consultation. METHODS: A ten-step process was completed: 1) permission to modify adult R-MAPP, 2) literature search to inform the Pedi-R-MAPP content, 3) Pedi-R-MAPP draft, 4) international survey of HCP practice using TECS, 5) nutrition experts invited to participate in a modified Delphi process, 6) first stakeholder meeting to agree purpose/draft of the tool, 7) round-one online survey, 8) statements with consensus removed from survey, 9) round-two online survey for statements with no consensus and 10) second stakeholder meeting with finalisation of the Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool. RESULTS: The international survey completed by 463 HCPs, 55% paediatricians, 38% dietitians, 7% nurses/others. When HCPs were asked to look back over the last 12 months, dietitians (n = 110) reported that 5.7 ± 10.6 out of every 10 appointments were completed in person; compared to paediatricians (n = 182) who reported 7.5 ± 7.0 out of every 10 appointments to be in person (p < 0.0001), with the remainder completed as TECS consultations. Overall, 74 articles were identified and used to develop the Pedi-R-MAPP which included colour-coded advice using a traffic light system; green, amber, red and purple. Eighteen participants agreed to participate in the Delphi consensus and completed both rounds of the modified Delphi survey. Agreement was reached at the first meeting on the purpose and draft sections of the proposed tool. In round-one of the online survey, 86% (n = 89/104) of statements reached consensus, whereas in round-two 12.5% (n = 13/104) of statements reached no consensus. At the second expert meeting, contested statements were discussed until agreement was reached and the Pedi-R-MAPP could be finalised. CONCLUSION: The Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool was developed using a modified Delphi consensus. This tool aims to support the technological transformation fast-tracked by the COVID-19 pandemic by providing a structured approach to completing a remote nutrition focused assessment, as well as identifying the frequency of follow up along with those children who may require in-person assessment.


Subject(s)
Child Health , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Nutrition Assessment , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Dietetics/instrumentation , Dietetics/methods , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Male , Nutritional Status , Pediatrics/instrumentation , Pediatrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e051227, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673427

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The increase in global wildland fire activity has accelerated the urgency to understand health risks associated with wildland fire suppression. The aim of this project was to identify occupational health research priorities for wildland firefighters and related personnel. DESIGN: In order to identify, rank and rate health research priorities, we followed a modified Delphi approach. Data collection involved a two-stage online survey followed by semi-structured interviews. SETTING: British Columbia, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included any current or past wildland firefighter or individuals engaged in related roles. There were 132 respondents to the first survey. Responses to the first survey were analysed to produce 10 research topics which were ranked by 75 participants in the second survey (response rate: 84%). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the identification, ranking and level of agreement of research priorities through a two-round online survey. We contextualised these findings through deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: The most important research priorities identified were (% consensus): effects of smoke inhalation on respiratory health (89%), fatigue and sleep (80%), mental health (78%), stress (76%) and long-term risk of disease (67%). Interviews were completed with 14 individuals. Two main themes were developed from an inductive content analysis of interview transcripts: (1) understanding the dynamic risk environment; and (2) organisational fit of mitigation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: Participants expressed a general concern with the unknown mental and physical health impacts of their jobs, including the long-term risk of morbidity and mortality. Future research must address knowledge gaps in our understanding of the health impacts of wildland fire and work to develop appropriate mitigation strategies while considering the needs of workers and unpredictable workplace environment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Open Science Framework, https://osf.io/ugz4s/.


Subject(s)
Firefighters , Wildfires , British Columbia , Delphi Technique , Humans , Research
7.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(1): 4-5, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643410
8.
Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol ; 50(3): 211-219, 2022 03.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641270

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To provide clinical practice guidelines about fertility preservation (FP) for women with benign gynecologic disease (BGD) developed by a modified Delphi consensus process for oocyte vitrification in women with benign gynecologic disease. METHODS: A steering committee composed of 14 healthcare professionals and a patient representative with lived experience of endometriosis identified 42 potential practices related to FP for BGD. Then 114 key stakeholders including various healthcare professionals (n=108) and patient representatives (n=6) were asked to participate in a modified Delphi process via two online survey rounds from February to September 2020 and a final meeting. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this final meeting to reach consensus was held as a videoconference in November 2020. RESULTS: Survey response of stakeholders was 75 % (86/114) for round 1 and 87 % (75/86) for round 2. Consensus was reached for the recommendations for 28 items, that have been distributed into five general categories: (i) Information to provide to women of reproductive age with a BGD, (ii) Technical aspects of FP for BGD, (iii) Indications for FP in endometriosis, (iv) Indications for FP for non-endometriosis BGD, (v) Indications for FP after a fortuitous diagnosis of an idiopathic diminished ovarian reserve. CONCLUSION: These guidelines provide some practice advice to help health professionals better inform women about the possibilities of cryopreserving their oocytes prior to the management of a BGD that may affect their ovarian reserve and fertility. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): The CNGOF (Collège National des Gynécologues Obstétriciens Français) funded the implementation of the Delphi process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endometriosis , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/therapy , Female , Humans , Oocytes/physiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitrification
9.
Gut ; 71(2): 238-253, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622066

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori infection is mostly a family-based infectious disease. To facilitate its prevention and management, a national consensus meeting was held to review current evidence and propose strategies for population-wide and family-based H. pylori infection control and management to reduce the related disease burden. METHODS: Fifty-seven experts from 41 major universities and institutions in 20 provinces/regions of mainland China were invited to review evidence and modify statements using Delphi process and grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation system. The consensus level was defined as ≥80% for agreement on the proposed statements. RESULTS: Experts discussed and modified the original 23 statements on family-based H. pylori infection transmission, control and management, and reached consensus on 16 statements. The final report consists of three parts: (1) H. pylori infection and transmission among family members, (2) prevention and management of H. pylori infection in children and elderly people within households, and (3) strategies for prevention and management of H. pylori infection for family members. In addition to the 'test-and-treat' and 'screen-and-treat' strategies, this consensus also introduced a novel third 'family-based H. pylori infection control and management' strategy to prevent its intrafamilial transmission and development of related diseases. CONCLUSION: H. pylori is transmissible from person to person, and among family members. A family-based H. pylori prevention and eradication strategy would be a suitable approach to prevent its intra-familial transmission and related diseases. The notion and practice would be beneficial not only for Chinese residents but also valuable as a reference for other highly infected areas.


Subject(s)
Family Health , Helicobacter Infections/prevention & control , Helicobacter pylori , Infection Control/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Helicobacter Infections/diagnosis , Helicobacter Infections/transmission , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Young Adult
10.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(3): 379-390, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616122

ABSTRACT

To develop Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) for the use of Telehealth in Rheumatology in the Arab region, to identify the main barriers and facilitators of telehealth, and to provide rheumatologists with a practical toolkit for the implementation of telehealth. Guidelines were drafted by a core steering committee from the Arab League of Associations for Rheumatology (ArLAR) after performing a literature search. A multidisciplinary task force (TF), including 18 rheumatologists, 2 patients, and 2 regulators from 15 Arab countries, assessed the BPG using 3 rounds of anonymous online voting by modified Delphi process. The statements were included in the final BPG without further voting if ≥ 80% of TF members indicated high agreement. The voting on barriers and facilitators was performed through one voting round. The toolkit was developed based on available literature and discussions during the Delphi rounds. Four General Principles and twelve Statements were formulated. A teleconsultation was specifically defined for the purpose of these guidelines. The concept of choice in telehealth was highlighted, emphasizing patient confidentiality, medical information security, rheumatologist's clinical judgment, and local jurisdictional regulations. The top barrier for telehealth was the concern about the quality of care. The toolkit emphasized technical aspects of teleconsultation and proposed a triage system. The ArLAR BPG provide rheumatologists with a series of strategies about the most reliable, productive, and rational approaches to apply telehealth.


Subject(s)
Rheumatology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Arab World , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delphi Technique , Humans
12.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 22(4): e102-e107, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598293

ABSTRACT

People with COVID-19 might have sustained postinfection sequelae. Known by a variety of names, including long COVID or long-haul COVID, and listed in the ICD-10 classification as post-COVID-19 condition since September, 2020, this occurrence is variable in its expression and its impact. The absence of a globally standardised and agreed-upon definition hampers progress in characterisation of its epidemiology and the development of candidate treatments. In a WHO-led Delphi process, we engaged with an international panel of 265 patients, clinicians, researchers, and WHO staff to develop a consensus definition for this condition. 14 domains and 45 items were evaluated in two rounds of the Delphi process to create a final consensus definition for adults: post-COVID-19 condition occurs in individuals with a history of probable or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, usually 3 months from the onset, with symptoms that last for at least 2 months and cannot be explained by an alternative diagnosis. Common symptoms include, but are not limited to, fatigue, shortness of breath, and cognitive dysfunction, and generally have an impact on everyday functioning. Symptoms might be new onset following initial recovery from an acute COVID-19 episode or persist from the initial illness. Symptoms might also fluctuate or relapse over time. A separate definition might be applicable for children. Although the consensus definition is likely to change as knowledge increases, this common framework provides a foundation for ongoing and future studies of epidemiology, risk factors, clinical characteristics, and therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 690570, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591006

ABSTRACT

Research is essential for evidence-based decision making. This study aimed to identify research priorities in the areas of field epidemiology and public health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) from the perspectives of public health professionals. A Delphi technique, using online survey, was employed to reach 168 public health professionals who have experience in the EMR countries. The study took place between November 2019 and January 2020. Consensus on the research priorities was reached after two-round online questionnaires. A list of top 10 field epidemiology and public health research priorities in the EMR was developed. Of those priorities, four fell under health in emergency, war and armed conflict, two under communicable diseases, two under immunization, one under digital health, and one under sexual, reproductive, and adolescent health. Availability, adequacy, and quality of health services in crisis settings were scored as a top priority (mean = 4.4, rank 1), followed by use of technology to improve the collection, documentation, and analysis of health data (mean = 4.28, rank 2), and capacity of countries in the region to respond to emergencies (mean = 4.25, rank 3). This study was conducted prior to COVID-19 pandemic and, thus, it did not capture COVID-19 research as a priority area. Nevertheless, identified priorities under communicable diseases including outbreak investigation of infectious diseases, epidemics and challenges related to communicable diseases in the EMR were still notable. In conclusion, the field epidemiology and public health research priorities identified in this study through a systematic inclusive process could be useful to make informed decisions and gear the research efforts to improve the health of people in the EMR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Adolescent , Delphi Technique , Humans , Pandemics , Research , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580720

ABSTRACT

Due to a lack of published evidence on the topic, a modified Delphi approach was used to develop recommendations useful for chronic pain management during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on the available literature and personal clinical expertise, an Italian board of nine professionals from different disciplines identified four main topics: prevention of chronic pain, treatment of chronic pain, consequences of inadequate treatment, and perspectives. They elaborated a semi-structured questionnaire. A multidisciplinary panel of experts in the field of pain management was requested to comment on the statements. Based on the answers provided, a structured questionnaire was prepared (Round 1). It included 21 statements divided into three categories (organizational issues; diagnosis and therapies; telemedicine and future perspectives). A five-point Likert scale was adopted. The threshold for consensus was set at a minimum of 70% of the number of respondents (level of agreement ≥ 4, Agree or Strongly Agree). A final questionnaire with rephrasing of the statements that did not reach the consensus threshold was elaborated (Round 2). A total of 29 clinicians were included in the panel. Twenty clinicians (69%) responded in both the first and second round. After two rounds, consensus (≥70%) was achieved in 20 out of 21 statements. The lack of consensus was recorded for the statement regarding the management of post-COVID pain (55%; Median 4; IQR 2.3). Another statement on telemedicine reached the threshold in the first round (70%), but the value was not confirmed in Round 2 (65%; Median 4; IQR 2). Most of the proposed items reached consensus, suggesting the need to make organizational changes, the structuring of careful diagnostic and therapeutic pathways, and the application of new technologies in pain medicine. Long-COVID-19 care is an issue that needs further research. Remote assistance for chronic pain must be regulated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Pain Management , COVID-19/complications , Chronic Pain/diagnosis , Chronic Pain/therapy , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , Pandemics
15.
Curr Oncol ; 28(6): 5332-5345, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572387

ABSTRACT

Virtual cancer care (i.e., teleoncology) was rapidly adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic to meet the needs of patients with cancer. However, there is a paucity of guidance for clinicians regarding virtual cancer care. We sought to develop consensus-based statements to guide the optimal provision of virtual care for clinicians caring for patients with cancer, using a modified Delphi consensus process with a 29-member panel consisting of an interprofessional group of clinicians caring for patients with cancer and patient representatives. The consensus process consisted of two rounds and one synchronous final consensus meeting. At the end of the modified Delphi process, 62 of 62 statements achieved consensus. Fifty-seven statements reached consensus in the first round of the process. Concerns regarding the ability to convey difficult news virtually and maintaining similar standards as in-person care without disproportionate strain on clinicians and patients were addressed in the consensus process. We achieved interprofessional consensus on virtual cancer care practices. Further research examining the impact of virtual cancer care on person-centred and clinical outcomes are needed to inform practices during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Arch Osteoporos ; 16(1): 176, 2021 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554071

ABSTRACT

The objective of this consensus statement is to inform the clinical practice communities, research centres and policymakers across Africa of the results of the recommendations for osteoporosis prevention, diagnosis and management. The developed guideline provides state-of-the-art information and presents the conclusions and recommendations of the consensus panel regarding these issues. PURPOSE: To reach an African expert consensus on a treat-to-target strategy, based on current evidence for best practice, for the management of osteoporosis and prevention of fractures. METHOD: A 3-round Delphi process was conducted with 17 osteoporosis experts from different African countries. All rounds were conducted online. In round 1, experts reviewed a list of 21 key clinical questions. In rounds 2 and 3, they rated the statements stratified under each domain for its fit (on a scale of 1-9). After each round, statements were retired, modified or added in view of the experts' suggestions and the percent agreement was calculated. Statements receiving rates of 7-9 by more than 75% of experts' votes were considered as achieving consensus. RESULTS: The developed guidelines adopted a fracture risk-centric approach. Results of round 1 revealed that of the 21 proposed domains, 10 were accepted whereas 11 were amended. In round 2, 32 statements were presented: 2 statements were retired for similarity, 9 statements reached consensus, whereas modifications were suggested for 21 statements. After the 3rd round of rating, the experts came to consensus on the 32 statements. Frequency of high-rate recommendation ranged from 83.33 to 100%. The response rate of the experts was 100%. An algorithm for the osteoporosis management osteoporosis was suggested. CONCLUSION: This study is an important step in setting up a standardised osteoporosis service across the continent. Building a single model that can be applied in standard practice across Africa will enable the clinicians to face the key challenges of managing osteoporosis; furthermore, it highlights the unmet needs for the policymakers responsible for providing bone health care together with and positive outcomes of patients' care.


Subject(s)
Fractures, Bone , Osteoporosis , Bone Density , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Fractures, Bone/prevention & control , Humans , Osteoporosis/diagnosis , Osteoporosis/drug therapy
17.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 22(3): e74-e87, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510480

ABSTRACT

During the current COVID-19 pandemic, health-care workers and uninfected patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are at risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 as a result of transmission from infected patients and health-care workers. In the absence of high-quality evidence on the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, clinical practice of infection control and prevention in ICUs varies widely. Using a Delphi process, international experts in intensive care, infectious diseases, and infection control developed consensus statements on infection control for SARS-CoV-2 in an ICU. Consensus was achieved for 31 (94%) of 33 statements, from which 25 clinical practice statements were issued. These statements include guidance on ICU design and engineering, health-care worker safety, visiting policy, personal protective equipment, patients and procedures, disinfection, and sterilisation. Consensus was not reached on optimal return to work criteria for health-care workers who were infected with SARS-CoV-2 or the acceptable disinfection strategy for heat-sensitive instruments used for airway management of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Well designed studies are needed to assess the effects of these practice statements and address the remaining uncertainties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consensus , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intensive Care Units/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Delphi Technique , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/standards
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 732539, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506375

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed significant gaps in mental health in terms of unrecognized and unmet needs. The goal was to accurately assess the needs and identify gaps in this area during the epidemiological crisis. A Delphi study to identify the needs was conducted with a group of decision-makers, experts, and users of mental health services. A starting point of the Delphi study was prepared in two working groups, based on recognizable international recommendations and experiences of the practitioners from the field situation. This initial set of emergency measures was supplemented through the first Delphi round, and consensus about the importance was reached in the second round. A total of 41 activities were derived, the vast majority of which were rated with a score of 4 or more. Mental health activities, which should be addressed in terms of needs, can be divided into systemic measures and service measures. This study recognizes a need to reorganize services in the direction of improving local accessibility and strengthening the network of services for immediate responses to the psychological, health, and social needs of individuals, including those arising from crisis situations, such as COVID-19 pandemic. The results of this study are in line with the international recommendations and also influenced the formulation of the Action Plan of the National Mental Health Program, while some of the measures were already implemented during the publication of the research results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans , Mental Health , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Pharmacol Res ; 174: 105955, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487920

ABSTRACT

Severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by numerous complications, complex disease, and high mortality, making its treatment a top priority in the treatment of COVID-19. Integrated traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and western medicine played an important role in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of COVID-19 during the epidemic. However, currently there are no evidence-based guidelines for the integrated treatment of severe COVID-19 with TCM and western medicine. Therefore, it is important to develop an evidence-based guideline on the treatment of severe COVID-19 with integrated TCM and western medicine, in order to provide clinical guidance and decision basis for healthcare professionals, public health personnel, and scientific researchers involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of COVID-19 patients. We developed and completed the guideline by referring to the standardization process of the "WHO handbook for guideline development", the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, and the Reporting Items for Practice Guidelines in Healthcare (RIGHT).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Medicine/trends , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/trends , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Evidence-Based Medicine/trends , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
20.
Int J Med Inform ; 157: 104618, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare providers have improved consumer access to healthcare services by the adoption of information communication technology and the use of telemedicine. With the current COVID-19 pandemic, consumers are shifting to remote teleconsultation. There are several studies regarding consumers' acceptance and satisfaction with telemedicine among healthcare providers and a few among patients at healthcare facilities. However, studies about patients' motivation toward the use of teleconsultation systems are very few. AIM: The aim of this study was to validate an instrument of a newly developed framework to identify factors that motivate patients to use a teleconsultation system. METHOD: This study used a modified eDelphi method incorporating content validity index and content validity ratio procedures to validate the instrument among fifteen experts from different disciplines. The eDelphi consisted of three rounds to review each item's relevance, clarity, importance and the overall validity of the instrument. RESULT: The result showed a significant level of agreement among experts for individual items' relevance, clarity and importance. For relevance, all items had excellent I-CVI above 0.889, except one item with I-CVI = 0.78, which is still acceptable. For clarity, all items had an excellent I-CVI > 0.889, except one with I-CVI = 0.667. For importance, most items had CVR above the threshold value of 0.778, except 5 items. Also, the result showed moderate to high content validity of the overall instrument (S-CVI/UA = 0.694; S-CVI/Ave = 0.996). DISCUSSION: These findings support the validity and reliability of the developed instrument, which can be used to identify factors that motivated patients to use a teleconsultation system. Future testing of the instrument should be conducted with a larger population that uses a teleconsultation system. CONCLUSION: An instrument was developed to identify factors that motivated consumers to use teleconsultation, using a modified eDelphi method among experts. The eDelphi method consisted of three rounds and the results showed that the instrument is a valid and reliable tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Delphi Technique , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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