Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 600
Filter
1.
Alzheimers Dement ; 18(4): 790-809, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2172367

ABSTRACT

In tandem with the ever-increasing aging population in low and middle-income countries, the burden of dementia is rising on the African continent. Dementia prevalence varies from 2.3% to 20.0% and incidence rates are 13.3 per 1000 person-years with increasing mortality in parts of rapidly transforming Africa. Differences in nutrition, cardiovascular factors, comorbidities, infections, mortality, and detection likely contribute to lower incidence. Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated neurocognitive disorders are the most common dementia subtypes. Comprehensive longitudinal studies with robust methodology and regional coverage would provide more reliable information. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is most studied but has shown differential effects within African ancestry compared to Caucasian. More candidate gene and genome-wide association studies are needed to relate to dementia phenotypes. Validated culture-sensitive cognitive tools not influenced by education and language differences are critically needed for implementation across multidisciplinary groupings such as the proposed African Dementia Consortium.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Dementia, Vascular , Dementia , Aged , Alzheimer Disease/genetics , Apolipoprotein E4/genetics , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/genetics , Dementia, Vascular/complications , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genotype , Humans
3.
Lancet Neurol ; 20(2): 90, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2184738
4.
arxiv; 2023.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-ARXIV | ID: ppzbmed-2301.09322v1

ABSTRACT

Cerebral Microbleeds (CMBs), typically captured as hypointensities from susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), are particularly important for the study of dementia, cerebrovascular disease, and normal aging. Recent studies on COVID-19 have shown an increase in CMBs of coronavirus cases. Automatic detection of CMBs is challenging due to the small size and amount of CMBs making the classes highly imbalanced, lack of publicly available annotated data, and similarity with CMB mimics such as calcifications, irons, and veins. Hence, the existing deep learning methods are mostly trained on very limited research data and fail to generalize to unseen data with high variability and cannot be used in clinical setups. To this end, we propose an efficient 3D deep learning framework that is actively trained on multi-domain data. Two public datasets assigned for normal aging, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease analysis as well as an in-house dataset for COVID-19 assessment are used to train and evaluate the models. The obtained results show that the proposed method is robust to low-resolution images and achieves 78% recall and 80% precision on the entire test set with an average false positive of 1.6 per scan.


Subject(s)
545 , 2600 , 59585 , 34247 , 3718
5.
medrxiv; 2023.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2023.01.05.23284214

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected health and social care services. We aimed to explore whether this impacted the prescribing rates of antipsychotics within at-risk populations. Methods With the approval of NHS England, we completed a retrospective cohort study, using the OpenSAFELY platform to explore primary care data of 59 million patients. We identified patients in five at-risk groups: autism, dementia, learning disability, serious mental illness and care home residents. We then calculated the monthly prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing in the population, as well as the incidence of new prescriptions in each month over the study period (Jan 2019-Dec 2021). Results The average monthly rate of antipsychotic prescribing increased in dementia from 82.75 patients prescribed an antipsychotic per 1000 patients (95% CI 82.30-83.19) in Q1 2019 to 90.1 (95% CI 89.68-90.60) in Q4 2021 and from 154.61 (95% CI 153.79-155.43) in Q1 2019 to 166.95 (95% CI 166.23-167.67) in Q4 2021 in care homes . There were notable spikes in the rate of new prescriptions issued to patients with dementia and in care homes. In learning disability and autism groups, the average monthly rate of prescribing per 1000 decreased from 122.97 (95% CI 122.29-123.66) in Q1 2019 to 119.29 (95% CI 118.68-119.91) in Q4 2021, and from 54.91 (95% CI 54.52-55.29) in Q1 2019 to 51.04 (95% CI 50.74-51.35) in Q4 2021 respectively. Conclusions During each of the lockdowns in 2020, we observed a significant spike in antipsychotic prescribing in the dementia and care home groups. We have shown that these peaks are likely due to prescribing of antipsychotics for palliative care purposes and may have been linked to pre-emptive prescribing, when on-site medical visits would have been restricted. Over the study period, we observed gradual increases in antipsychotic use in patients with dementia and in care homes and a decrease in their use in patients with learning disability or autism.


Subject(s)
1327 , 59585 , 8777 , 8037 , 3718
6.
Epidemiol Infect ; 150: e189, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150941

ABSTRACT

The risk factors specific to the elderly population for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the Omicron variant of concern (VOC) are not yet clear. We performed an exploratory analysis using logistic regression to identify risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness among 4,868 older adults with a positive severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) test result who were admitted to a healthcare facility between 1 January 2022 and 16 May 2022. We then conducted one-to-one propensity score (PS) matching for three factors - dementia, admission from a long-term care facility and poor physical activity status - and used Fisher's exact test to compare the proportion of severe COVID-19 cases in the matched data. We also estimated the average treatment effect on treated (ATT) in each PS matching analysis. Of the 4,868 cases analysed, 1,380 were severe. Logistic regression analysis showed that age, male sex, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic lung disease, renal failure and/or dialysis, physician-diagnosed obesity, admission from a long-term care facility and poor physical activity status were risk factors for severe disease. Vaccination and dementia were identified as factors associated with non-severe illness. The ATT for dementia, admission from a long-term care facility and poor physical activity status was -0.04 (95% confidence interval -0.07 to -0.01), 0.09 (0.06 to 0.12) and 0.17 (0.14 to 0.19), respectively. Our results suggest that poor physical activity status and living in a long-term care facility have a substantial association with the risk of severe COVID-19 caused by the Omicron VOC, while dementia may be associated with non-severe illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Male , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Exercise , Dementia/epidemiology
7.
medrxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2022.12.23.22283884

ABSTRACT

Background: Some studies have identified declines in mental health over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic across the world and in different age groups, including older people. As anxiety and depression are common neuropsychiatric symptoms among people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, the mental health experiences of older people during the pandemic should therefore take cognitive function into consideration. This should also be examined using quantitative measures that were assessed prior to the pandemic. This study addresses such gaps in the evidence base on depression and anxiety among older people with cognitive impairment before and throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods and Findings: Using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) collected from 2018/19 to Nov/Dec 2020, we estimated changes in depression and anxiety for people aged 50+ in England across three cognitive function groups: no impairment, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia. We found that depression (measured with CES-D score) worsened from 2018/19 to Nov/Dec 2020 for people with mild cognitive impairment (1.39 (95%CI: 1.29-1.49) to 2.16 (2.02-2.30)) or no impairment (1.17 (95%CI: 1.12-1.22) to 2.03 (1.96-2.10)). Anxiety, using a single-item rating of 0-10 also worsened among those with mild cognitive impairment (2.48 (2.30-2.66) to 3.14 (2.95-3.33)) or no impairment (2.20 (2.11-2.28) to 2.85 (2.77-2.95)). No statistically significant increases were found for those with dementia. Using a clinical cutoff for likely depression (CES-D>=4), we found statistically significant increases in the probability of likely clinical depression between 2018/19 and Nov/Dec 2020 for those with no impairment (0.110 (0.099-0.120) to 0.206 (0.191-0.222)) and those with mild impairment (0.139 (0.120-0.159) to 0.234 (0.204-0.263)). We also found that differences according to cognitive function that existed before the pandemic were no longer present by June/July 2020, and there were no statistically significant differences in depression or anxiety among cognitive groups in Nov/Dec 2020. Conclusions: Our findings on measures collected before and during the pandemic suggest a convergence in mental health across cognitive function groups during the pandemic. This suggests mental health services will need to meet an increased demand that will come from older adults, especially those not living with cognitive impairment or dementia. We also found little significant change in mental health outcomes among those with dementia; as their existing need for support will remain, policymakers and care practitioners will need to ensure this group continues to have equitable access to support for their mental health.


Subject(s)
3103 , 59585 , 3886 , 1014 , 3718 , 36008
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1372, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dementia is a disease that impacts people with dementia, their families, and the healthcare system. In 2018, the number of people with dementia in the EU, the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), and the UK was estimated to be 9.1 million. National dementia strategies and publications by organisations such as Alzheimer Europe outline how dementia-specific care should be designed. This study aims to provide insights into existing formal care structures, models of good practise, and gaps in dementia-specific care for people with dementia in 17 European countries. METHODS: The research is based on guided interviews with country-specific care experts. A mixed-methods approach with a combination of open and closed questions was used. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim based on the transcription rules of Kuckarts (2010). For data evaluation, the qualitative content analysis model of Mayring (2014) was used. RESULTS: In all 17 countries, efforts for dementia-friendly care and models of good care practise exist. However, there are large differences between European countries regarding the spread of dementia-specific services. In nine countries (Bulgaria, Finland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the UK), there are already nationwide structures, while in five countries (Belgium, Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Romania), services are only available in certain regions. In three countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany) dementia-specific outpatient services are widespread nationwide, whereas inpatient services are not. Simultaneously, in all countries, areas with major care gaps exist. Several European states have an urgent need for action concerning the expansion of the provision of dementia-specific services, the reduction of regional differences regarding the provision of care, the elimination of barriers to access to care, the dementia-friendliness of services, and the participation of people with dementia and their relatives in care and research. CONCLUSIONS: To reduce the existing structural inequalities in care between and within European countries, and to establish quality-related minimum standards in the care of people with dementia, transnational concepts are needed. The EU, in cooperation with care planners, research institutions, care providers, and patient organisations, should develop European care guidelines or dementia plans that contain concrete measures, schedules, and budgets.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Dementia , Humans , Europe , Italy , Netherlands , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy
9.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 878, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139163

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Significant mortality amongst vulnerable populations, such as people living with dementia, might go undetected during pandemic conditions due to refocus of care efforts. There is an urgent need to fully evaluate the pandemic impact on mortality amongst people living with dementia in order to facilitate future healthcare reforms and prevent deaths. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was any significant difference in mortality amongst people with dementia without COVID-19 during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to previous years. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in 5 databases. The relative risk ratio and confidence interval was used to estimate the change in mortality rates amongst people with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The I2 value was used to assess heterogeneity, publication bias, and sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: Pooled analysis of 11 studies showed that mortality amongst people living with dementia was significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic for people with dementia without COVID-19. Mortality risk increased by 25% during the time period studied. Subgroup analysis was not performed due the low number of included studies. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that people with dementia had a significant increased mortality during the pandemic even if they did not have COVID-19. People with dementia should participate in efforts that reduce general social spread and pandemic impact on healthcare system such as vaccinations, mask mandates, and testing. These results have clinical implications as preventing direct COVID-19 infection is not enough to adequately protect people living with dementia from increased mortality. Measures to limit social spread of infections and help support patients should also be a focus for clinicians. Further research should focus on the identification of mechanisms and other explanations for increased mortality as well as contributing factors such as living in care homes and differences between countries with various pandemic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Pandemics , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy
10.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 852, 2022 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elder abuse is a serious issue with a global prevalence of 15.7% in the community setting. Persons with dementia are at higher risk of elder abuse than the older population in general. With a high and increasing prevalence of dementia this issue cannot be neglected. Hence, the aims of this study were 1) to describe the proportion of abusive episodes among home-dwelling persons with dementia and their informal caregivers, and 2) to explore differences between informal caregivers who have reported committing and not committing abusive acts. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among informal caregivers of home-dwelling persons with dementia in Norway from May to December 2021 with a total of 549 participants. RESULTS: Two-thirds of informal caregivers had committed at least one abusive episode toward the person with dementia in the past year (63.5% psychological abuse, 9.4% physical abuse, 3.9% financial abuse, 2.4% sexual abuse, 6.5% neglect). One-third of informal caregivers had experienced aggression from the person with dementia (33.9% psychological abuse, 7.8% physical abuse, 1.1% financial abuse, 1.4% sexual abuse). Tests for independence showed that the risk of abusive episodes from informal caregivers toward persons with dementia was higher when the informal caregiver was a spouse/partner of the person with dementia and if they experienced aggression from the person with dementia. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that a majority of informal caregivers commit some form of abusive episodes, and episodes that fall within the scope of psychological abuse are most frequent. This study expands knowledge about elder abuse among home-dwelling persons with dementia. Increased understanding of the dynamics of abuse is essential to be able to reduce risk and prevent abuse.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Elder Abuse , Humans , Aged , Caregivers/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/psychology , Elder Abuse/psychology , Norway/epidemiology
12.
MEDICC Rev ; 24(3-4): 9, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146589
13.
medrxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2022.12.20.22283699

ABSTRACT

Background: Dementia is associated with frailty leading to increased risks of falls and hospitalisations. Interventions are required to maintain functional ability, strength and balance. Design: Multi-centre parallel group randomised controlled trial, with embedded process evaluation. Procedures were adapted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants: People with mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), living at home, and a family member or carer. Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of an exercise and functional activity therapy intervention compared to usual care. Intervention: A specially-designed dementia-specific rehabilitation programme focussing on strength, balance, physical activity and performance of ADL, which was tailored, progressive, addressed risk and the psychological and learning needs of people with dementia, providing up to 50 therapy sessions over 12 months. The control group received usual care plus a falls risk assessment. Main outcome measure: The primary outcome was the informant-reported Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD) 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes were: self-reported ADL, cognition, physical activity, quality of life, frailty, balance, functional mobility, fear of falling, mood, carer strain and service use (at 12 months) and falls (between months 4 and 15). Results: 365 people were randomised, 183 to intervention and 182 to control. Median age of participants was 80 years (range 65-95), median Montreal Cognitive Assessment score 20/30 (range 13-26), 58% were men. Participants received a median of 31 (IQR = 22-40) therapy sessions out of a possible maximum of 50. Participants reported completing a mean 121 minutes/week of PrAISED activity outside of supervised sessions. Primary outcome data were available for 149 (intervention) and 141 (control) participants. There was no difference in DAD scores between groups: adjusted mean difference -1.3/100, 95% Confidence Interval (-5.2 to +2.6); Cohens d effect size -0.06 (-0.26 to +0.15); p=0.5. Upper 95% confidence intervals excluded small to moderate effects on any of the range of secondary outcome measures. Between months 4 and 15 there were 79 falls in the intervention group and 200 falls in the control group, adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.78 (0.5 to 1.3); p= 0.3. Conclusion: The intensive PrAISED programme of exercise and functional activity training did not improve ADLs, physical activity, quality of life, reduce falls or improve any other secondary health status outcomes even though uptake was good. Future research should consider alternative approaches to risk reduction and ability maintenance. Trial registration: ISRCTN15320670 . Funding: National Institute for Health and Care Research


Subject(s)
59585 , 3718 , 3103
14.
researchsquare; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-RESEARCHSQUARE | ID: ppzbmed-10.21203.rs.3.rs-2368250.v1

ABSTRACT

Background: Continuous participation of dementia prevention program is important to the community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, reducing treatment gaps using non-face-to-face program is important in COVID-19. The aim of this study is to introduce evidence-based non face-to-face dementia prevention program in Korean context, and to identify the effect of non-face-to-face dementia prevention program on cognitive function and depression of community-dwelling elderly during the COVID 19 pandemic. Methods: A total of 101 community-dwelling elderly without dementia participated in 12 sessions of a non-face-to-face dementia prevention program designed by occupational therapist. Cognitive functions and depression were tested. Results: Every item of cognitive function was maintained, and memory increased. The symptoms of depression decreased significantly. From the opinions of the participants, participation in new activities, reduction of boredom, communication, and reminisce were benefits of this program. Conclusions: Non-face-to-face dementia prevention program is an effective method to maintain and increase cognitive function and prevent depression on community-dwelling elderly. The community-based non-face-to-face occupational therapy program of this study is useful to give chance to participate in continuous activities during the COVID 19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
59585 , 3886 , 3718 , 3103
15.
psyarxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | PREPRINT-PSYARXIV | ID: ppzbmed-10.31234.osf.io.tuqzg

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Many stroke survivors adopt or return to a sedentary lifestyle after stroke. This sedentarism, in turn, impacts on quality of life, physical function, and puts survivors at a significantly greater risk of another stroke, developing dementia, or chronic illness. There is little known about the barriers and facilitators of exercise after stroke and what could be done to minimise the effects of barriers and to build on facilitators of exercise. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators of exercise after stroke from the perspective of stroke survivors, family caregivers, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Methods: Semi-structured phone interviews with 13 stroke survivors, 8 family caregivers and 13 therapists (one focus group consisting of 4 therapists), exploring perceived barriers and facilitators to exercise after stroke were completed. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Demographic information including current physical activity levels, stroke impact, and physical and mental fatigue were also collected. The themes generated were subsequently mapped onto the Theoretical Domains Framework to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that influence exercise behaviour and help identify appropriate techniques to address perceived barriers. Results: TDF domains that were perceived by all three groups were: knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences, goals, memory attention and decision processes, environmental context and resources, social influences and emotion. The most reported TDF domains were environmental context and resources, social influences, emotion and beliefs about capabilities. The most common barriers that were perceived by all three groups were: covid restrictions, access to services, lack of professional support, physical capability and fatigue. The most common facilitators that were perceived by all three groups were: greater access to services and facilities, social support from others and group exercise programmes. Conclusions: Perceptions of the barriers and facilitators of exercise differ across stroke survivors, therapists and caregivers. It is vital that stroke services address the barriers to exercise after stroke and building on the facilitators to ensure that survivors receive optimal post-stroke care.


Subject(s)
1295 , 5326 , 34247 , 3718 , 5325
16.
medrxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2022.12.05.22283108

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Successful communication in daily life frequently depends on accurate decoding of speech signals that are acoustically degraded by challenging listening conditions. This process presents the brain with a demanding computational task that is vulnerable to neurodegenerative pathologies. However, despite recent intense interest in the link between hearing impairment and dementia, daily hearing measures (such as degraded speech comprehension) in these diseases remain poorly defined. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 19 patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and 31 patients representing canonical syndromes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), in relation to 25 healthy age-matched controls. As a model paradigm for the acoustically degraded speech signals of daily life, we used noise-vocoding: synthetic division of the speech signal into a variable number of frequency channels constituted from amplitude-modulated white noise, such that fewer channels convey less spectrotemporal detail thereby reducing intelligibility. We investigated the impact of noise-vocoding on recognition of spoken three-digit numbers and used psychometric modelling to ascertain the threshold number of noise-vocoding channels required for 50% intelligibility by each participant. Associations of noise-vocoded speech intelligibility threshold with general demographic, clinical and neuropsychological characteristics and regional grey matter volume (defined by voxel-based morphometry of patients’ brain MR images) were also assessed. Compared with healthy older controls, all patient groups had a significantly higher mean noise-vocoded speech intelligibility threshold, particularly marked in logopenic variant and nonfluent-agrammatic variant PPA and significantly higher in AD than in semantic variant PPA (all p<0.05). Noise-vocoded intelligibility threshold discriminated dementia syndromes (in particular, Alzheimer’s disease) well from healthy controls. Further, this central hearing measure correlated with overall disease severity but not with measures of peripheral hearing or clear speech perception. Neuroanatomically, after correcting for multiple voxel-wise comparisons in pre-defined regions of interest, impaired noise-vocoded speech comprehension across dementia syndromes was significantly associated (p<0.05) with atrophy of left planum temporale, angular gyrus and anterior cingulate gyrus: a cortical network widely implicated in processing degraded speech signals. Taken together, our findings suggest that the comprehension of acoustically altered speech captures a central process relevant to daily hearing and communication in major dementia syndromes, with novel diagnostic and therapeutic implications.


Subject(s)
3718 , 1290 , 6470 , 545
17.
Cells ; 11(19)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109954

ABSTRACT

Although dementia is a heterogenous group of diseases, inflammation has been shown to play a central role in all of them and provides a common link in their pathology. This review aims to highlight the importance of immune response in the most common types of dementia. We describe molecular aspects of pro-inflammatory signaling and sources of inflammatory activation in the human organism, including a novel infectious agent, SARS-CoV-2. The role of glial cells in neuroinflammation, as well as potential therapeutic approaches, are then discussed. Peripheral immune response and increased cytokine production, including an early surge in TNF and IL-1ß concentrations activate glia, leading to aggravation of neuroinflammation and dysfunction of neurons during COVID-19. Lifestyle factors, such as diet, have a large impact on future cognitive outcomes and should be included as a crucial intervention in dementia prevention. While the use of NSAIDs is not recommended due to inconclusive results on their efficacy and risk of side effects, the studies focused on the use of TNF antagonists as the more specific target in neuroinflammation are still very limited. It is still unknown, to what degree neuroinflammation resulting from COVID-19 may affect neurodegenerative process and cognitive functioning in the long term with ongoing reports of chronic post-COVID complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal , Cytokines , Humans , Neuroinflammatory Diseases , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors
19.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 78: 103308, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085887

ABSTRACT

WHO recognized Dementia as public health priority and developed iSupport, a knowledge and skills training program for carers of people living with Dementia. This Mixed-Method study assessed the effectiveness of web-based training sessions among carers at old age homes in and around Puducherry, India, using WHO-iSupport for dementia hardcopy manual as a training tool. We registered the clinical trial protocol with Clinical Trial Registry-India (CTRI), CTRI/2020/11/029154. We determined the change in 35 carer's knowledge and attitude following the training sessions using pre and post-test questionnaires quantitatively. Further, we explored their learning experience by conducting eight descriptive one-to-one telephonic interviews. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted this study online. i.e., obtained virtual consents, pre and post-test using Google forms, and training sessions through a webbased platform. We divided carers into groups where each carer attended two training sessions, and each session lasted for 2 h. Training sessions improved the carer's knowledge from a pre-test score of Median (IQR) 12 (9, 15) to a post-test score of 17 (16, 20) and attitude score from 30 (27.3, 34.8) to 33.5 (30.3, 39) in post-test. They perceived that the training sessions were helpful as they gained knowledge on dementia care, and their attitude has changed optimistically towards people living with Dementia. These findings suggest that web-based training has an effect and indicates the need for training among carers in various old age homes for betterment in providing care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Aged , Humans , Caregivers/education , Dementia/therapy , Homes for the Aged , Internet , Pandemics , World Health Organization
20.
WMJ ; 121(3): 226-230, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083714

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: People living with dementia have been particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey of dementia care professionals was conducted to assess the use of health care and community-based services by people living with dementia and their caregivers during the first year of the pandemic. RESULTS: The survey indicated that most services were no longer being used or were being used less during the pandemic, with a few key exceptions. DISCUSSION: Many barriers and few facilitators were identified to service use for people living with dementia and their caregivers. The results identify potential gaps in the dementia care service network and may inform efforts to improve dementia care during future large-scale public health emergencies in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Humans , Caregivers , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Community Health Services , Delivery of Health Care
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL