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1.
Cien Saude Colet ; 25(suppl 1): 2457-2460, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725049

ABSTRACT

Mental disorders (MD) are commonly comorbid with cardiovascular, metabolic, and some infectious diseases. Since the current SARS-CoV-2 epidemic is affecting the most multimorbid individuals, we might expect that the epidemic will be particularly problematic for people with MD. Understanding the burden of an outbreak on mental health is fundamental to effective action towards containing the spread of the disease, as psychopathology might reduce endurance during the lockdown. This can potentially reduce adhesion to ongoing treatment resulting in avoidable recurrence of a disorder. Additionally, there is the stress caused by the eminent risk of infection or economic uncertainty, especially in low-middle income settings. This is an overview on the expected influence of the COVID-19 on mental health from a research group that has not long ago been involved in the Zika epidemic. It aims to discuss the effects of the pandemic on a Low and Middle-Income country (LMIC), Brazil.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Developing Countries , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Bipolar Disorder/psychology , Bipolar Disorder/therapy , Brazil , COVID-19 , Caregivers , Dementia/nursing , Family , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Multimorbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensation , Social Isolation
2.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 85(3): 1045-1052, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528806

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic worsened vulnerability of patients with dementia (PWD). This new reality associated with government restriction and isolation worsened stress burden and psychological frailties in PWD caregivers. OBJECTIVE: To give tele-psychological support to caregivers and evaluate the effect of this intervention by quantifying stress burden and quality of life during the first COVID-19 lockdown. METHODS: 50 caregivers were divided into two groups: "Caregiver-focused group" (Cg) and "Patient-focused group" (Pg). Both groups received telephone contact every 2 weeks over a 28-week period, but the content of the call was different: in Cg, caregivers answered questions about the state of the PWD but also explored their own emotional state, stress burden, and quality of life. In Pg instead, telephone contacts were focused only on the PWD, and no evaluation regarding the caregiver mood or state of stress was made. Psychometric scales were administered to evaluate COVID-19 impact, stress burden, and quality of life. RESULTS: Considering the time of intervention, from baseline (W0) to W28, Zarit Burden Interview and Quality of Life-caregiver questionnaires remained unchanged in Cg as compared with baseline (p > 0.05), whereas they worsened significantly in Pg (p < 0.01), showing increased stress over time and decreased quality of life in this group. Moreover, Impact on Event Scale values improved over the weeks in Cg (p = 0.015), while they remained unchanged in Pg (p = 0.483). CONCLUSION: Caregivers who received telephone support about their mood and stress burden did not worsen their psychological state during the time of intervention, as did instead those who did not get such support.


Subject(s)
Caregiver Burden/therapy , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/nursing , Psychological Distress , Psychosocial Support Systems , Telephone , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
BMC Fam Pract ; 21(1): 141, 2020 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The potential value of expanding the Practice Nurse role to include the recognition and management of dementia has been acknowledged. Practice Nurses are well-positioned to provide comprehensive dementia information and support so that people living with dementia are better equipped to self-manage their health and live well with dementia. The purpose of this review was to systematically examine published literature to identify existing and potential roles of Practice Nurse's in the delivery of care to people affected by dementia and to describe the characteristics and effectiveness of nurse interventions in dementia models of care. METHODS: The PRISMA statement guided the systematic review of the quantitative and qualitative evidence for roles and characteristics of the Practice Nurse in the delivery of dementia care. A comprehensive literature search of seven electronic databases and Google scholar identified relevant original research published in English between January 2000 and January 2019. Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria and were extracted into the Covidence software for analysis. RESULTS: The heterogeneity of the included studies purpose, design and outcomes measures and the diversity in health systems and primary care nurses scope of practice made it difficult to synthesise the findings and draw conclusions. The heterogeneity did, however, provide important insights into the characteristics of roles undertaken by nurses working in the general practice setting, which were potentially beneficial to people living with dementia and their support person. These included patient accessibility to the Practice Nurse, early recognition and management of cognitive changes, care management and collaboration with the General Practitioner. Limitations of the provision of dementia care by Practice Nurses included a lack of definition of the role, inadequate dementia specific training, time constraints and poor communication with General Practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: Embedding an evidence-based model that describes the role of the Practice Nurse in dementia care provision has the potential to increase early recognition of cognitive impairment and more appropriate primary care management of dementia. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO 2018 CRD42018088191.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Evidence-Based Nursing/methods , Nurse's Role , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Cognition , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/nursing , Dementia/psychology , Humans
4.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(10): 510-512, 2020 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326017
6.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 1: CD006440, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013997

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many people with dementia are cared for at home by unpaid informal caregivers, usually family members. Caregivers may experience a range of physical, emotional, financial and social harms, which are often described collectively as caregiver burden. The degree of burden experienced is associated with characteristics of the caregiver, such as gender, and characteristics of the person with dementia, such as dementia stage, and the presence of behavioural problems or neuropsychiatric disturbances. It is a strong predictor of admission to residential care for people with dementia. Psychoeducational interventions might prevent or reduce caregiver burden. Overall, they are intended to improve caregivers' knowledge about the disease and its care; to increase caregivers' sense of competence and their ability to cope with difficult situations; to relieve feelings of isolation and allow caregivers to attend to their own emotional and physical needs. These interventions are heterogeneous, varying in their theoretical framework, components, and delivery formats. Interventions that are delivered remotely, using printed materials, telephone or video technologies, may be particularly suitable for caregivers who have difficulty accessing face-to-face services because of their own health problems, poor access to transport, or absence of substitute care. During the COVID-19 pandemic, containment measures in many countries required people to be isolated in their homes, including people with dementia and their family carers. In such circumstances, there is no alternative to remote delivery of interventions. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy and acceptability of remotely delivered interventions aiming to reduce burden and improve mood and quality of life of informal caregivers of people with dementia. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group, MEDLINE, Embase and four other databases, as well as two international trials registries, on 10 April 2020. We also examined the bibliographies of relevant review papers and published trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included only randomised controlled trials that assessed the remote delivery of structured interventions for informal caregivers who were providing care for people with dementia living at home. Caregivers had to be unpaid adults (relatives or members of the person's community). The interventions could be delivered using printed materials, the telephone, the Internet or a mixture of these, but could not involve any face-to-face contact with professionals. We categorised intervention components as information, training or support. Information interventions included two key elements: (i) they provided standardised information, and (ii) the caregiver played a passive role. Support interventions promoted interaction with other people (professionals or peers). Training interventions trained caregivers in practical skills to manage care. We excluded interventions that were primarily individual psychotherapy. Our primary outcomes were caregiver burden, mood, health-related quality of life and dropout for any reason. Secondary outcomes were caregiver knowledge and skills, use of health and social care resources, admission of the person with dementia to institutional care, and quality of life of the person with dementia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Study selection, data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias in included studies were done independently by two review authors. We used the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) to describe the interventions. We conducted meta-analyses using a random-effects model to derive estimates of effect size. We used GRADE methods to describe our degree of certainty about effect estimates. MAIN RESULTS: We included 26 studies in this review (2367 participants). We compared (1) interventions involving training, support or both, with or without information (experimental interventions) with usual treatment, waiting list or attention control (12 studies, 944 participants); and (2) the same experimental interventions with provision of information alone (14 studies, 1423 participants). We downgraded evidence for study limitations and, for some outcomes, for inconsistency between studies. There was a frequent risk of bias from self-rating of subjective outcomes by participants who were not blind to the intervention. Randomisation methods were not always well-reported and there was potential for attrition bias in some studies. Therefore, all evidence was of moderate or low certainty. In the comparison of experimental interventions with usual treatment, waiting list or attention control, we found that the experimental interventions probably have little or no effect on caregiver burden (nine studies, 597 participants; standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.35 to 0.23); depressive symptoms (eight studies, 638 participants; SMD -0.05, 95% CI -0.22 to 0.12); or health-related quality of life (two studies, 311 participants; SMD 0.10, 95% CI -0.13 to 0.32). The experimental interventions probably result in little or no difference in dropout for any reason (eight studies, 661 participants; risk ratio (RR) 1.15, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.53). In the comparison of experimental interventions with a control condition of information alone, we found that experimental interventions may result in a slight reduction in caregiver burden (nine studies, 650 participants; SMD -0.24, 95% CI -0.51 to 0.04); probably result in a slight improvement in depressive symptoms (11 studies, 1100 participants; SMD -0.25, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.06); may result in little or no difference in caregiver health-related quality of life (two studies, 257 participants; SMD -0.03, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.21); and probably result in an increase in dropouts for any reason (12 studies, 1266 participants; RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.20). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Remotely delivered interventions including support, training or both, with or without information, may slightly reduce caregiver burden and improve caregiver depressive symptoms when compared with provision of information alone, but not when compared with usual treatment, waiting list or attention control. They seem to make little or no difference to health-related quality of life. Caregivers receiving training or support were more likely than those receiving information alone to drop out of the studies, which might limit applicability. The efficacy of these interventions may depend on the nature and availability of usual services in the study settings.


ANTECEDENTES: Muchas personas con demencia son atendidas en casa por cuidadores informales no remunerados, generalmente miembros de la familia. Los cuidadores pueden sufrir una serie de efectos perjudiciales físicos, emocionales, económicos y sociales, que a menudo se describen colectivamente como una carga para el cuidador. El grado de carga que se experimenta está asociado con las características del cuidador, como el género, y con las características de la persona con demencia, como la etapa de la demencia, y la presencia de problemas de comportamiento o trastornos neuropsiquiátricos. Es un fuerte predictor del ingreso en una residencia para personas con demencia. Las intervenciones psicoeducativas pueden prevenir o reducir la carga del cuidador. En general, tienen como objetivo mejorar los conocimientos de los cuidadores sobre la enfermedad y su cuidado; aumentar el sentido de competencia de los cuidadores y su capacidad para afrontar situaciones difíciles; aliviar los sentimientos de aislamiento y permitir que los cuidadores atiendan sus propias necesidades emocionales y físicas. Estas intervenciones son heterogéneas y varían en su marco teórico, sus componentes y sus formatos de administración. Las intervenciones que se realizan a distancia, utilizando material impreso, el teléfono o las tecnologías de vídeo, pueden ser particularmente adecuadas para los cuidadores que tienen dificultades para acceder a los servicios de forma presencial debido a sus propios problemas de salud, al escaso acceso al transporte o a la falta de un cuidado alternativo. Durante la pandemia de covid­19, las medidas de contención en muchos países exigían que las personas estuvieran aisladas en sus hogares, incluidas las personas con demencia y sus familiares cuidadores. En tales circunstancias, no hay alternativa a la realización de intervenciones a distancia. OBJETIVOS: Evaluar la eficacia y la aceptabilidad de las intervenciones realizadas a distancia con el fin de reducir la carga y mejorar el estado de ánimo y la calidad de vida de los cuidadores informales de personas con demencia. MÉTODOS DE BÚSQUEDA: El 10 de abril de 2020 se realizaron búsquedas en el Registro especializado del Grupo Cochrane de Demencia y trastornos cognitivos (Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group), MEDLINE, Embase y otras cuatro bases de datos, así como en dos registros internacionales de ensayos. También se examinaron las bibliografías de documentos de revisión pertinentes y de ensayos publicados. CRITERIOS DE SELECCIÓN: Sólo se incluyeron los ensayos controlados aleatorizados que evaluaron la administración a distancia de intervenciones estructuradas para los cuidadores informales que atendían a personas con demencia que vivían en el domicilio. Los cuidadores debían ser adultos no remunerados (parientes o miembros de la comunidad de la persona). Las intervenciones se podían realizar utilizando materiales impresos, el teléfono, la internet o una mezcla de estos, pero no podían implicar un contacto presencial con profesionales. Los componentes de la intervención se clasificaron como información, formación o apoyo. Las intervenciones de información incluyeron dos elementos clave: i) proporcionaron información estandarizada, y ii) el cuidador desempeñaba un papel pasivo. Las intervenciones de apoyo promovieron la interacción con otras personas (profesionales o iguales). Las intervenciones de formación entrenaron a los cuidadores en habilidades prácticas para proporcionar la atención. Se excluyeron las intervenciones que consistieron principalmente en psicoterapia individual. Los desenlaces principales fueron la carga del cuidador, el estado de ánimo, la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud y el abandono por cualquier motivo. Los desenlaces secundarios fueron los conocimientos y aptitudes de los cuidadores, la utilización de los recursos de atención sanitaria y social, el ingreso de la persona con demencia en una institución y la calidad de vida de la persona con demencia. OBTENCIÓN Y ANÁLISIS DE LOS DATOS: Dos autores de la revisión realizaron de forma independiente la selección de los estudios, la extracción de los datos y la evaluación del riesgo de sesgo de los estudios incluidos. Se utilizó la Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) para describir las intervenciones. Los metanálisis se realizaron mediante un modelo de efectos aleatorios para obtener las estimaciones del tamaño del efecto. Se utilizaron los métodos GRADE para describir el grado de certeza sobre las estimaciones del efecto. RESULTADOS PRINCIPALES: En esta revisión se incluyeron 26 estudios (2367 participantes). Se compararon (1) las intervenciones que incluyeron formación, apoyo o ambos, con o sin información (intervenciones experimentales) con el tratamiento habitual, una lista de espera o el control de la atención (12 estudios, 944 participantes); y (2) las mismas intervenciones experimentales con el suministro de información solamente (14 estudios, 1423 participantes). La calidad de la evidencia se redujo por las limitaciones de los estudios y, en el caso de algunos desenlaces, por la falta de consistencia entre los estudios. Hubo un riesgo frecuente de sesgo debido a la autocalificación de los desenlaces subjetivos por parte de participantes que no estaban cegados a la intervención. Los métodos de asignación al azar no siempre se informaron bien y hubo un posible sesgo de desgaste en algunos estudios. Por lo tanto, toda la evidencia fue de certeza moderada o baja. En la comparación de las intervenciones experimentales con el tratamiento habitual, una lista de espera o el control de la atención, se encontró que las intervenciones experimentales probablemente tienen poco o ningún efecto sobre la carga del cuidador (nueve estudios, 597 participantes; diferencia de medias estandarizada [DME] ­0,06; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: ­0,35 a 0,23); los síntomas depresivos (ocho estudios, 638 participantes; DME ­0,05; IC del 95%: ­0,22 a 0,12) o la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud (dos estudios, 311 participantes; DME 0,10; IC del 95%: ­0,13 a 0,32). Las intervenciones experimentales probablemente dan lugar a poca o ninguna diferencia en el abandono por cualquier motivo (ocho estudios, 661 participantes; razón de riesgos [RR] 1,15; IC del 95%: 0,87 a 1,53). En la comparación de las intervenciones experimentales con una condición control de información sola, se encontró que las intervenciones experimentales pueden dar lugar a una leve reducción de la carga del cuidador (nueve estudios, 650 participantes; DME ­0,24; IC del 95%: ­0,51 a 0,04); probablemente dan lugar a una leve mejoría de los síntomas depresivos (11 estudios, 1100 participantes; DME ­0,25; IC del 95%: ­0,43 a ­0,06); podrían dar lugar a poca o ninguna diferencia en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud de los cuidadores (dos estudios, 257 participantes; DME ­0,03; IC del 95%: ­0,28 a 0,21); y probablemente dé lugar a un aumento de los abandonos por cualquier motivo (12 estudios, 1266 participantes; RR 1,51; IC del 95%: 1,04 a 2,20). CONCLUSIONES DE LOS AUTORES: Las intervenciones realizadas a distancia, como el apoyo, la formación o ambas, con o sin información, podrían reducir ligeramente la carga del cuidador y mejorar los síntomas depresivos del cuidador en comparación con el suministro de información únicamente, pero no en comparación con el tratamiento habitual, una lista de espera o el control de la atención. Parecen dar lugar a poca o ninguna diferencia en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud. Los cuidadores que recibieron formación o apoyo tuvieron más probabilidades de abandonar los estudios que los que recibieron sólo información, lo que podría limitar la aplicabilidad. La eficacia de esas intervenciones puede depender de la naturaleza y la disponibilidad de los servicios habituales en los ámbitos de estudio.


Subject(s)
Caregiver Burden/prevention & control , Caregivers/education , Dementia/nursing , Affect , Bias , Caregivers/psychology , Family , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Institutionalization/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
7.
Nurs Ethics ; 28(1): 46-57, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978876

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on care homes in the United Kingdom, particularly for those residents living with dementia. The impetus for this article comes from a recent review conducted by the authors. That review, a qualitative media analysis of news and academic articles published during the first few months of the outbreak, identified ethical care as a key theme warranting further investigation within the context of the crisis. To explore ethical care further, a set of salient ethical values for delivering care to care home residents living with dementia during the pandemic was derived from a synthesis of relevant ethical standards, codes and philosophical approaches. The ethical values identified were caring, non-maleficence, beneficence, procedural justice, dignity in death and dying, well-being, safety, and personhood. Using these ethical values as a framework, alongside examples from contemporaneous media and academic sources, this article discusses the delivery of ethical care to care home residents with dementia within the context of COVID-19. The analysis identifies positive examples of ethical values displayed by care home staff, care sector organisations, healthcare professionals and third sector advocacy organisations. However, concerns relating to the death rates, dignity, safety, well-being and personhood - of residents and staff - are also evident. These shortcomings are attributable to negligent government strategy, which resulted in delayed guidance, lack of resources and Personal Protective Equipment, unclear data, and inconsistent testing. Consequently, this review demonstrates the ways in which care homes are underfunded, under resourced and undervalued.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/nursing , Homes for the Aged/standards , Nursing Homes/standards , Aged , Health Policy , Homes for the Aged/ethics , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes/ethics , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
8.
Health Soc Work ; 45(4): 289-292, 2021 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975289
9.
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 29(1): 27-34, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Caregivers of people with dementia (pwD) are at risk of depression, anxiety, and burden. COVID-19 pandemic and government-imposed lockdown as a preventive measure might increase psychological symptoms in caregivers. The authors performed a study to measure the change of psychological symptoms during quarantine or self-isolation for COVID-19 in a sample of Italian caregivers of pwD, and to investigate if the resilience is associated with psychological changes in the sample. METHODS: Eighty-four caregivers of pwD completed an online survey including questionnaires assessing depressive symptomatology and anxiety before and during the lockdown, caregiver burden and levels of resilience. RESULTS: The multivariate analysis of variance revealed an effect of time (before and during the lockdown) in the whole group on depression scores; a significant interaction between time and resilience was found on anxiety scores, revealing that caregivers with high resilience showed a more significant increase of anxiety levels during lockdown than caregivers with low resilience. Moreover, the regression analysis revealed that caregiver burden was associated negatively with resilience scores, and positively with higher functional dependence. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown produced psychological consequences in caregivers of pwD, with an increase of levels of depression. Moreover, high resilience had a negative effect on anxiety levels and no effect on depressive symptomatology during the lockdown; moreover, it was associated with lower levels of caregiver burden. All caregivers, even those with high resilience levels, should be addressed to psychological interventions to reduce levels of depression, anxiety and caregiver burden.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caregivers/psychology , Cost of Illness , Dementia/nursing , Depression/psychology , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Time Factors
12.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 113: 103781, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The acute nature of COVID-19 and its effects on society in terms of social distancing and quarantine regulations affect the provision of palliative care for people with dementia who live in long-term care facilities. The current COVID-19 pandemic poses a challenge to nursing staff, who are in a key position to provide high-quality palliative care for people with dementia and their families. OBJECTIVE: To formulate practice recommendations for nursing staff with regard to providing palliative dementia care in times of COVID-19. DESIGN AND METHOD: A rapid scoping review following guidelines from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Eligible papers focused on COVID-19 in combination with palliative care for older people or people with dementia and informed practical nursing recommendations for long-term care facilities. After data extraction, we formulated recommendations covering essential domains in palliative care adapted from the National Consensus Project's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. DATA SOURCES: We searched the bibliographic databases of PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO for academic publications. We searched for grey literature using the search engine Google. Moreover, we included relevant letters and editorials, guidelines, web articles and policy papers published by knowledge and professional institutes or associations in dementia and palliative care. RESULTS: In total, 23 documents (7 (special) articles in peer-reviewed journals, 6 guides, 4 letters to editors, 2 web articles (blogs), 2 reports, a correspondence paper and a position paper) were included. The highest number of papers informed recommendations under the domains 'advance care planning' and 'psychological aspects of care'. The lowest number of papers informed the domains 'ethical care', 'care of the dying', 'spiritual care' and 'bereavement care'. We found no papers that informed the 'cultural aspects of care' domain. CONCLUSION: Literature that focuses specifically on palliative care for people with dementia in long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic is still largely lacking. Particular challenges that need addressing involve care of the dying and the bereaved, and ethical, cultural and spiritual aspects of care. Moreover, we must acknowledge grief and moral distress among nursing staff. Nursing leadership is needed to safeguard the quality of care and nursing staff should work together within an interprofessional care team to initiate advance care planning conversations in a timely manner, to review and document advance care plans, and to adapt goals of care as they may change due to the COVID-19 situation. Tweetable abstract: The current COVID-19 pandemic affects people living with dementia, their families and their professional caregivers. This rapid scoping review searched for academic and grey literature to formulate practical recommendations for nursing staff working in long-term care facilities on how to provide palliative care for people with dementia in times of COVID-19. There is a particular need for grief and bereavement support and we must acknowledge grief and moral distress among nursing staff. This review exposes practice and knowledge gaps in the response to COVID-19 that reflect the longstanding neglect and weaknesses of palliative care in the long-term care sector. Nursing leadership is needed to safeguard the quality of palliative care, interprofessional collaboration and peer support among nursing staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/nursing , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Nursing, Practical , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Long-Term Care , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci ; 76(4): e241-e245, 2021 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725492

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess family caregivers' primary appraisal of stressors related to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, secondary appraisal of resources and support availability, and use of coping strategies as predictors of perceived role overload during the stay-at-home phase of the pandemic. METHOD: Telephone interviews with 53 family caregivers of persons with dementia from rural Virginia 2 weeks after enactment of the governor's stay-at-home order using structured and open-ended questions were conducted. RESULTS: Caregivers who were more concerned about the COVID-19 pandemic were at greater odds of experiencing high role overload than those who recognized positive aspects of the pandemic, as were those who received insufficient support from family and friends. DISCUSSION: Use of the transactional model of stress responses yielded important insights about families coping with dementia. Caregivers' perceptions of the pandemic's impact varied, with differential effects on their well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Social Support , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/nursing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Virginia
15.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S220-S221, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616909

ABSTRACT

Restrictions related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pose unique and significant challenges for community-dwelling caregivers and people with dementia, including disrupted routines, a lack of structure, decreased access to respite care, and new or worsening safety issues related to interpersonal violence and hygiene. In addition to identifying issues confronting caregivers, the authors also describe possible ways to address some of these pressing concerns. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Caregivers/psychology , Coronavirus Infections , Dementia/nursing , Dementia/psychology , Independent Living/psychology , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Middle Aged , Respite Care , Social Isolation/psychology
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