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3.
Int Psychogeriatr ; 33(10): 1005-1007, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492960
4.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258914, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480460

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Risk factors of severe COVID-19 have mainly been investigated in the hospital setting. We investigated pre-defined risk factors for testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection and cardiovascular or pulmonary complications in the outpatient setting. METHODS: The present cohort study makes use of ambulatory claims data of statutory health insurance physicians in Bavaria, Germany, with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test confirmed or excluded SARS-CoV-2 infection in first three quarters of 2020. Statistical modelling and machine learning were used for effect estimation and for hypothesis testing of risk factors, and for prognostic modelling of cardiovascular or pulmonary complications. RESULTS: A cohort of 99 811 participants with PCR test was identified. In a fully adjusted multivariable regression model, dementia (odds ratio (OR) = 1.36), type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.14) and obesity (OR = 1.08) were identified as significantly associated with a positive PCR test result. Significant risk factors for cardiovascular or pulmonary complications were coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR = 2.58), hypertension (OR = 1.65), tobacco consumption (OR = 1.56), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR = 1.53), previous pneumonia (OR = 1.53), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR = 1.25) and type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.23). Three simple decision rules derived from prognostic modelling based on age, hypertension, CKD, COPD and CHD were able to identify high risk patients with a sensitivity of 74.8% and a specificity of 80.0%. CONCLUSIONS: The decision rules achieved a high prognostic accuracy non-inferior to complex machine learning methods. They might help to identify patients at risk, who should receive special attention and intensified protection in ambulatory care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Coronary Disease , Hypertension , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Disease/therapy , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Germany , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463656

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The integration of technology-based interventions into health and care provision in our aging society is still a challenge especially in the care pathway for people with dementia. OBJECTIVE: The study aims to: (1) identify which socio-demographic characteristics are independently associated with the use of the embodied conversational agent among subjects with dementia, (2) uncover patient cluster profiles based on these characteristics, and (3) discuss technology-based interventions challenges. METHODS: A virtual agent was used for four weeks by 55 persons with dementia living in their home environment. RESULTS: Participants evaluated the agent as easy-to-use and quickly learnable. They felt confident while using the system and expressed the willingness to use it frequently. Moreover, 21/55 of the patients perceived the virtual agent as a friend and assistant who they could feel close to and who would remind them of important things. CONCLUSIONS: Technology-based interventions require a significant effort, such as personalized features and patient-centered care pathways, to be effective. Therefore, this study enriches the open discussion on how such virtual agents must be evidence-based related and designed by multidisciplinary teams, following patient-centered care as well as user-centered design approaches.


Subject(s)
Communication , Dementia , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Patient-Centered Care , Technology
6.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(11): 2258-2262.e1, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted use of home care services for individuals with dementia across service types and sociodemographic strata. DESIGN: Population-based time series analysis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling adults with dementia in Ontario, Canada, from January 2019 to September 2020. METHODS: We used health administrative databases (Ontario Registered Persons Database and Home Care Database) to measure home care services used by participants. Poisson regression models were fit to compare weekly rates of home care services during the pandemic to historical trends with rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by service type (nursing, personal care, therapy), sex, rurality, and neighborhood income quintile. RESULTS: During the first wave of the pandemic, personal care fell by 16% compared to historical levels (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.84, 0.85) and therapies fell by 50% (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.48, 0.52), whereas nursing did not significantly decline (RR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00, 1.04). All rates had recovered by September 2020, with nursing and therapies higher than historical levels. Changes in services were largely consistent across sociodemographic strata, although the rural population experienced a larger decline in personal care and smaller rebound in nursing. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Personal care and therapies for individuals with dementia were interrupted during the early months of the pandemic, whereas nursing was only minimally impacted. Pandemic responses with the potential to disrupt home care for individuals living with dementia must balance the impacts on individuals with dementia, caregivers, and providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Home Care Services , Adult , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Independent Living , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1003, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 isolated home-dwelling people with dementia (PwD) from home care services, respite care, and daytime activities. We aimed to investigate the consequences of these restrictions on informal (family, friends) and formal (homecare staff) resource utilization among co-residing (e.g., spouses) and visiting caregivers (e.g., children). METHODS: 105 PwD (≥65 years old) and their caregivers were included in the prospective PANdemic in DEMentia (PAN.DEM) study, which was initiated when the ongoing stepped-wedge, cluster randomized LIVE@Home.Path trial (N = 438) was temporarily halted due to the pandemic. Primary outcome was change in resource utilization assessed by the Resource Utilization in Dementia Care (RUD) instrument in pre- (12 Dec. 2019 to 11 Mar. 2020) and during the lockdown periods (20 April 2020 to 15 May 2020). Degree of cognitive impairment was assessed by Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), and physical functioning and independent living skills by Physical Self-Maintenance Scale and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale. Associations between informal and formal care utilization, socio-demographics, and clinical variables were assessed by descriptive statistics and Ordinary Least Squares models (OLS). RESULTS: Mean age for PwD was 81.8 years; 61% were female; 45.6% lived alone, and the mean MMSE score was 20.8 (SD ± 3.7). PwD with co-residents (44%) were younger (78.4 years) than those who were living alone (84.5 years; P < 0.001). During the first 2 months of lockdown, PwD missed on average 20.5 h of formal care in a month (P < 0.001) leading to an approximately 100% increase in informal care, which was particularly pronounced in personal hygiene (6.9 vs. 11.4 days in a month, P < 0.001) and supervision (9.2 vs. 17.6 days in a month; P < 0.001). Visiting caregivers increased by 1.9 days (SD ± 11.5), but co-residing caregivers increased their number of days providing ADL by approximately 7 days per month (ß = 6.9; CI, 0.39-13.1, P < 0.05) after adjusting for PwD and caregiver demographics and clinical variables. Decrease in home nursing care was particularly visible for PwD living alone (- 6.1 vs. -1.3 h per month, P = 0.005). Higher cognitive function (ß = - 0.64, CI, - 1.26 - 0.02, P = 0.044) was associated with reduction in home nursing service during the lockdown. CONCLUSION: The care situation for PwD changed dramatically in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, especially for those living alone who received less support from homecare services and visiting caregivers. For future crises and the forthcoming post-pandemic period, health authorities must plan better and identify and prioritize those in greatest need. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ; NCT04043364 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Caregivers , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403594

ABSTRACT

People with dementia (PwD) occupy around 25% of the hospital beds. Once PwD are admitted to hospitals, their cognitive impairment is not considered in most of the cases. Thus, it causes an impact on the development of the disease becoming a stressful situation as care plans are not adapted to PwD. The aim of this study was to explore the published core elements when designing a dementia care pathway for hospital settings. A scoping review was conducted to provide an overview of the available research evidence and identify the knowledge gaps regarding the topic. This review highlights person-centered care, compassionate care and end-of-life process as some of the key elements that should integrate the framework when designing a dementia care pathway. Architectonical outdoor and indoor hospital elements have also been found to be considered when adapting the healthcare context to PwD. Findings provide information about the key points to focus on to successfully design dementia interventions in hospital environments within available resources, mostly in those contexts in which national dementia plans are in its infancy. Hospitals should transform their patients' routes and processes considering the increasing demographic changes of people with cognitive impairment.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Dementia , Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy , Delivery of Health Care , Dementia/therapy , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans
9.
Public Health ; 194: 196-201, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392511

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In the face of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, people with dementia and their carers are contending with serious challenges to their health and wellbeing, due to risk of severe illness, limiting of social contact and disruption to usual activities. Many forms of support for people with dementia and their carers, including singing groups, have moved online using videoconferencing. Previous research has demonstrated the benefits of group singing, which include cognitive stimulation, meaningful activity and peer support. However, although we know which aspects of the singing group experience participants find helpful, we do not know how this experience translates into an online videoconferencing format, and this is a very new field with little existing research. This article reviews the literature pertinent to online singing interventions and uses the findings to develop some suggestions for running an online singing group. STUDY DESIGN: SCOPING REVIEW. METHODS: Systematic literature searches were conducted in EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Owing to the paucity of existing research, searches were also conducted in Google Scholar. The scope of the review covered five related areas: online music making and music therapy, telemedicine and telecare, everyday technology for people with dementia, digital arts and dementia, and use of technology for social interaction and leisure. Our analysis aimed to integrate the results to inform the implementation of online singing groups for people with dementia. RESULTS: Scoping of evidence from discrete fields of enquiry and different disciplinary traditions can inform the delivery of online singing in dementia. This literature also yields useful insights into the role of the carer and how best to support participants to use technology. Barriers and facilitators to online singing were found to relate both to the technology and to the individual participant. CONCLUSION: Lockdown restrictions have led to much innovation, and this is likely to lead to changes in practice even after normal life resumes. The suggestions in this article will be helpful primarily for practitioners moving into online work and researchers investigating this novel area. They may also be useful to commissioners and policymakers because they reflect current knowledge about best practice.


Subject(s)
Dementia/therapy , Music Therapy/methods , Singing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
10.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(8): e27926, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379916

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the United States, nearly 80% of family caregivers of people with dementia have at least one chronic condition. Dementia caregivers experience high stress and burden that adversely affect their health and self-management. mHealth apps can improve health and self-management among dementia caregivers with a chronic condition. However, mHealth app adoption by dementia caregivers is low, and reasons for this are not well understood. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to explore factors associated with dementia caregivers' intention to adopt mHealth apps for chronic disease self-management. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, correlational study and recruited a convenience sample of dementia caregivers. We created a survey using validated instruments and collected data through computer-assisted telephone interviews and web-based surveys. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, we recruited dementia caregivers through community-based strategies, such as attending community events. After nationwide closures due to the pandemic, the team focused on web-based recruitment. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test the relationships between the independent and dependent variables. RESULTS: Our sample of 117 caregivers had an average age of 53 (SD 17.4) years, 16 (SD 3.3) years of education, and 4 (SD 2.5) chronic conditions. The caregivers were predominantly women (92/117, 78.6%) and minorities (63/117, 53.8%), experienced some to extreme income difficulties (64/117, 54.7%), and were the child or child-in-law (53/117, 45.3%) of the person with dementia. In logistic regression models adjusting for the control variables, caregiver burden (odds ratio [OR] 1.3, 95% CI 0.57-2.8; P=.57), time spent caregiving per week (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.77-3.9; P=.18), and burden of chronic disease and treatment (OR 2.3, 95% CI 0.91-5.7; P=.08) were not significantly associated with the intention to adopt mHealth apps. In the final multiple logistic regression model, only perceived usefulness (OR 23, 95% CI 5.6-97; P<.001) and the interaction term for caregivers' education and burden of chronic disease and treatment (OR 31, 95% CI 2.2-430; P=.01) were significantly associated with their intention to adopt mHealth apps. Perceived ease of use (OR 2.4, 95% CI 0.67-8.7; P=.18) and social influence (OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.58-5.7; P=.31) were not significantly associated with the intention to adopt mHealth apps. CONCLUSIONS: When designing mHealth app interventions for dementia caregivers with a chronic condition, it is important to consider caregivers' perceptions about how well mHealth apps can help their self-management and which app features would be most useful for self-management. Caregiving factors may not be relevant to caregivers' intention to adopt mHealth apps. This is promising because mHealth strategies may overcome barriers to caregivers' self-management. Future research should investigate reasons why caregivers with a low education level and low burden of chronic disease and treatment have significantly lower intention to adopt mHealth apps for self-management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Caregivers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/therapy , Female , Humans , Intention , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378436

ABSTRACT

Dementia represents a significant problem in the Middle East. Sociocultural and political factors that shape conceptions of health and care tend to stifle research and the dissemination of knowledge throughout the Middle East. These socio-political challenges concerning engagement with individuals living with dementia and their carers include language barriers, stigmatization, logistical constraints, lack of informal support outside of hospitals, and over-dependence on clinicians for dementia information. There is an urgent need in the Middle East to increase care and support for adults with dementia and their carers, enhance research efforts and improve the dissemination of information related to dementia in the region. One possible way to do so is to begin to promote a knowledge-based culture throughout the Middle East. This can be achieved by aligning traditional deterministic and spiritual perspectives of mental health with more Western, scientific, and evidence-based models. We suggest employing practical, multidimensional approaches to deal with the stated challenges, both at individual and societal levels. Doing so will improve knowledge of dementia and allow health and social care systems in the Middle East to begin to address a growing problem.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Dementia , Adult , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Mental Health , Middle East , Social Support
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346471

ABSTRACT

Along with the burden commonly experienced by informal caregivers (ICs) of people with dementia (PwD), associated with the progressive decline that accompanies dementia, the lockdown due to the public health crisis has had a great negative impact on the emotional wellbeing, physical health, and social relationships of ICs. Support interventions through telemedicine represent an opportunity for ICs to learn the skills required for the care and maintenance of social networks. In this work, a narrative review of the effects of e-health training and social support interventions was carried out. A literature search was conducted using the ProQuest, Ovid, and Scopus databases. Information regarding social support (SS), psychological interventions, and training for the management of medications and behavioral changes was extracted. One hundred and nine studies were included in this review. Forums and training platforms were the main tools for ICs. The most effective platforms to improve SS include the participation of both ICs and health professionals. However, no significant improvements in objective caring skills were identified. Platforms developed specifically for ICs should be based in tools that ICs are familiar with, because many ICs have not yet incorporated Information and Communication Technologies in many activities of their daily lives. Education in the digitalization to ICs of PwD should be one of the priority objectives in telehealth interventions.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Telemedicine , Caregivers , Dementia/therapy , Health Personnel , Humans , Social Support
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(14)2021 07 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323245

ABSTRACT

Multicomponent training is recommended for people with dementia living in long-term care homes. Nevertheless, evidence is limited and people with severe dementia are often excluded from trials. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate (1) the feasibility and (2) the requirements regarding multicomponent training for people with moderate to severe dementia. The study was conducted as an uncontrolled single arm pilot study with a mixed methods approach. Fifteen nursing home residents with a mean age of 82 years (range: 75-90 years; female: 64%) with moderate to severe dementia received 16 weeks of multicomponent training. Feasibility and requirements of the training were assessed by a standardized observation protocol. Eleven participants regularly attended the intervention. The highest active participation was observed during gait exercises (64%), the lowest during strength exercises (33%). It was supportive if exercises were task-specific or related to everyday life. This study confirms that multicomponent training for the target group is (1) feasible and well accepted, and (2) to enhance active participation, individual instructions and the implementation of exercises related to everyday life is required. The effectiveness of the adapted training should be tested in future randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Long-Term Care , Child, Preschool , Dementia/therapy , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life
15.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e047789, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301646

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Community-based support for people with earlier-stage dementia and their care partners, such as regularly meeting groups and activities, can play an important part in postdiagnostic care. Typically delivered piecemeal in the UK, by a variety of agencies with inconsistent funding, provision is fragmented and many such interventions struggle to continue after only a short start-up period. This realist review investigates what can promote or hinder such interventions in being able to sustain long term. METHODS: Key sources of evidence were gathered using formal searches of electronic databases and grey literature, together with informal search methods such as citation tracking. No restrictions were made on article type or study design; only data pertaining to regularly meeting, ongoing, community-based interventions were included. Data were extracted, assessed, organised and synthesised and a realist logic of analysis applied to trace context-mechanism-outcome configurations as part an overall programme theory. Consultation with stakeholders, involved with a variety of such interventions, informed this process throughout. RESULTS: Ability to continually get and keep members; staff and volunteers; the support of other services and organisations; and funding/income were found to be critical, with multiple mechanisms feeding into these suboutcomes, sensitive to context. These included an emphasis on socialising and person-centredness; lowering stigma and logistical barriers; providing support and recognition for personnel; networking, raising awareness and sharing with other organisations, while avoiding conflict; and skilled financial planning and management. CONCLUSIONS: This review presents a theoretical model of what is involved in the long-term sustainability of community-based interventions. Alongside the need for longer-term funding and skilled financial management, key factors include the need for stigma-free, person-centred provision, sensitive to members' diversity and social needs, as well as the need for a robust support network including the local community, health and care services. Challenges were especially acute for small scale and rural groups.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Volunteers , Dementia/therapy , Humans
16.
Age Ageing ; 50(6): 1876-1885, 2021 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: informal carers provide the majority of the support for persons with dementia living at home. Restrictions imposed due to COVID-19 have had a profound impact on the daily life of the entire population. This study provides insight into the impact of these restrictions on carers of people with dementia living at home. DESIGN: qualitative semi-structured interviews. PARTICIPANTS: purposive sample of carers who provide at least 10 hours of care a week for the person with dementia living at home. SETTING: UK. RESULTS: twenty-three carers were interviewed, and thematic analysis identified three main themes-Changes to daily life, impact on carer health and wellbeing and reduced support from health and social support networks. The results highlight the impact of restrictions imposed on daily life and routines due to the pandemic, wellbeing of carers, reduced social support, lack of access to health and care professionals and respite for carers. The restrictions have had negative consequences on carers' wellbeing, and they have experienced difficulties in accessing formal care services and respite care. CONCLUSION: carers attempt to continue to provide physical, emotional and practical support for persons with dementia in the community throughout the COVID-19 restrictions. To prevent a future carer crisis, carers need better support systems including formal carer services, telecare solutions that work for them and additional support for respite, as the restrictions from this pandemic continue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Caregivers , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
17.
Int Psychogeriatr ; 33(6): 547-549, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281667
18.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2741-2744, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the ongoing D-CARE pragmatic trial of two models of dementia care management needed to transition to all data collection by telephone. METHODS: For the first 1069 D-CARE participants, we determined the feasibility of administering a short 3-item version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) to persons with dementia by telephone and examined the correlation with the full 12-item version. RESULTS: The 3-item version could be administered by telephone in approximately 6 min and was highly correlated with the full MoCA (r = 0.78, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: This brief version of the MoCA was feasible to collect by telephone and could be used as an alternative to the full MoCA, particularly if the purpose of cognitive assessment is characterization of study participants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Patient Care Management , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/psychology , Dementia/therapy , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Interviews as Topic/methods , Male , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/trends , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 82(4): 1531-1541, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with dementia (PWD) and their caregivers are populations highly vulnerable to COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. A better knowledge of the living conditions during the first lockdown is necessary to prevent the risk of poor mental health (PMH) in this population. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to compare the mental health of caregivers of PWD living at home or in nursing-homes and to identify specific factors influencing their mental health. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous cross-sectional online survey in France from March 17 to May 11, 2020. Three hundred and eighty-nine caregivers accompanying a PWD living at home (HC) and 159 accompanying a PWD living in a nursing home (NHC) participated in the study. Caregivers' mental health including anxiety, depression, stress, and burden was assessed with self-reported standardized scales. RESULTS: Half of the caregivers exhibited PMH, including depression, anxiety, or self-reported stress. Similar PMH rates were provided whatever the PWD place of residence. Regarding HC, our results also highlighted a number of risk factors for PMH, including the fact that caregiver live with PWD, to give increased support to PWD, and to feel more isolated for managing PWD since lockdown. CONCLUSION: PMH was observed for caregivers of PWD during lockdown, whatever PWD living place, suggesting that concern for PWD may explain more of caregiver distress than increased material tasks. In the future, it will be necessary to pay attention to caregivers after the crisis by estimating the longer-term impact on their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/psychology , Mental Health/trends , Aged , Caregivers/psychology , Caregivers/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/therapy , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Ageing Res Rev ; 69: 101373, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242880

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is relevant in older people. Attention was given to the nursing homes in which frailer people are usually admitted. In this review, we discuss the approaches for daily problems found in nursing home as geriatricians and potentially new research directions. We start with the problem of the older people affected by dementia and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia for which also the execution of a simple diagnostic test (such as nasopharyngeal swab) could be problematic. Another important problem is the management of wandering patients for which the re-organization of the spaces and vaccination could be the solutions. The relationship with families is another important problem, also from a medico-legal point of view, that can be faced using video conferencing tools. Moreover, we discussed the importance of stratifying prognosis in older nursing home residents for the best management and therapeutically approach, including palliative care, also using telemedicine and the inclusion of prognostic tools in daily clinical practice. Finally, we approached the therapeutical issues in older people that suggests the necessity of future research for finding older-friendly medications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Aged , Dementia/therapy , Geriatricians , Humans , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2
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