Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 69
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 240-249, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585242

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACTThe COVID-19 pandemic and measures against it provided a unique opportunity to understand the transmission of other infectious diseases and to evaluate the efficacy of COVID-19 prevention measures on them. Here we show a dengue epidemic in Yunnan, China, during the pandemic of COVID-19 was dramatically reduced compared to non-pandemic years and, importantly, spread was confined to only one city, Ruili. Three key features characterized this dengue outbreak: (i) the urban-to-suburban spread was efficiently blocked; (ii) the scale of epidemic in urban region was less affected; (iii) co-circulation of multiple strains was attenuated. These results suggested that countermeasures taken during COVID-19 pandemic are efficient to prevent dengue transmission between cities and from urban to suburban, as well to reduce the co-circulation of multiple serotypes or genotypes. Nevertheless, as revealed by the spatial analysis, once the dengue outbreak was established, its distribution was very stable and resistant to measures against COVID-19, implying the possibility to develop a precise prediction method.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Dengue Virus , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue/prevention & control , Dengue/transmission , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genotype , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Serogroup , Spatial Analysis , Vero Cells
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 7276, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575708

ABSTRACT

Double membrane vesicles (DMVs) serve as replication organelles of plus-strand RNA viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and SARS-CoV-2. Viral DMVs are morphologically analogous to DMVs formed during autophagy, but lipids driving their biogenesis are largely unknown. Here we show that production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) by acylglycerolphosphate acyltransferase (AGPAT) 1 and 2 in the ER is important for DMV biogenesis in viral replication and autophagy. Using DMVs in HCV-replicating cells as model, we found that AGPATs are recruited to and critically contribute to HCV and SARS-CoV-2 replication and proper DMV formation. An intracellular PA sensor accumulated at viral DMV formation sites, consistent with elevated levels of PA in fractions of purified DMVs analyzed by lipidomics. Apart from AGPATs, PA is generated by alternative pathways and their pharmacological inhibition also impaired HCV and SARS-CoV-2 replication as well as formation of autophagosome-like DMVs. These data identify PA as host cell lipid involved in proper replication organelle formation by HCV and SARS-CoV-2, two phylogenetically disparate viruses causing very different diseases, i.e. chronic liver disease and COVID-19, respectively. Host-targeting therapy aiming at PA synthesis pathways might be suitable to attenuate replication of these viruses.


Subject(s)
Hepacivirus/genetics , Phosphatidic Acids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology , 1-Acylglycerol-3-Phosphate O-Acyltransferase , Acyltransferases , Autophagosomes/metabolism , Autophagy , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cell Survival , Dengue Virus , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Viral Nonstructural Proteins , Viral Proteins , Zika Virus
4.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 55(2): 171-176, 2021 Feb 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468517

ABSTRACT

Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) refers to the process in which some virus-specific antibodies (generally non-neutralizing antibodies) bind to the virus and bind to some cells expressing FcR on the surface through their Fc segment, thereby mediating the endocytosis and replication of the virus and enhancing the infection of the virus. This review summarized experience of ADE in respiratory syncytial virus, dengue virus, influenza virus infection and explored the possible mechanism of COVID-19 high incidence and severity of the disease, which implied challenges in the process of vaccine development and provided some insights for COVID-19 pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue Virus , Dengue , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(7): e2444-e2449, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and dengue fever are difficult to distinguish given shared clinical and laboratory features. Failing to consider COVID-19 due to false-positive dengue serology can have serious implications. We aimed to assess this possible cross-reactivity. METHODS: We analyzed clinical data and serum samples from 55 individuals with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. To assess dengue serology status, we used dengue-specific antibodies by means of lateral-flow rapid test, as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, we tested SARS-CoV-2 serology status in patients with dengue and performed in-silico protein structural analysis to identify epitope similarities. RESULTS: Using the dengue lateral-flow rapid test we detected 12 positive cases out of the 55 (21.8%) COVID-19 patients versus zero positive cases in a control group of 70 healthy individuals (P = 2.5E-5). This includes 9 cases of positive immunoglobulin M (IgM), 2 cases of positive immunoglobulin G (IgG), and 1 case of positive IgM as well as IgG antibodies. ELISA testing for dengue was positive in 2 additional subjects using envelope protein directed antibodies. Out of 95 samples obtained from patients diagnosed with dengue before September 2019, SARS-CoV-2 serology targeting the S protein was positive/equivocal in 21 (22%) (16 IgA, 5 IgG) versus 4 positives/equivocal in 102 controls (4%) (P = 1.6E-4). Subsequent in-silico analysis revealed possible similarities between SARS-CoV-2 epitopes in the HR2 domain of the spike protein and the dengue envelope protein. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support possible cross-reactivity between dengue virus and SARS-CoV-2, which can lead to false-positive dengue serology among COVID-19 patients and vice versa. This can have serious consequences for both patient care and public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue Virus , Antibodies, Viral , Cross Reactions , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Bioorg Med Chem ; 49: 116415, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415233

ABSTRACT

Dengue remains a disease of significant concern, responsible for nearly half of all arthropod-borne disease cases across the globe. Due to the lack of potent and targeted therapeutics, palliative treatment and the adoption of preventive measures remain the only available options. Compounding the problem further, the failure of the only dengue vaccine, Dengvaxia®, also delivered a significant blow to any hopes for the treatment of dengue fever. However, the success of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protease inhibitors in the past have continued to encourage researchers to investigate other viral protease targets. Dengue virus (DENV) NS2B-NS3 protease is an attractive target partly due to its role in polyprotein processing and also for being the most conserved domain in the viral genome. During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a few cases of Dengue-COVID 19 co-infection were reported. In this review, we compared the substrate-peptide residue preferences and the residues lining the sub-pockets of the proteases of these two viruses and analyzed the significance of this similarity. Also, we attempted to abridge the developments in anti-dengue drug discovery in the last six years (2015-2020), focusing on critical discoveries that influenced the research.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Dengue Virus/enzymology , Humans , Protease Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 635701, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399135

ABSTRACT

Serological testing is a powerful tool in epidemiological studies for understanding viral circulation and assessing the effectiveness of virus control measures, as is the case of SARS-CoV-2, the pathogenic agent of COVID-19. Immunoassays can quantitatively reveal the concentration of antiviral antibodies. The assessment of antiviral antibody titers may provide information on virus exposure, and changes in IgG levels are also indicative of a reduction in viral circulation. In this work, we describe a serological study for the evaluation of antiviral IgG and IgM antibodies and their correlation with antiviral activity. The serological assay for IgG detection used two SARS-CoV-2 proteins as antigens, the nucleocapsid N protein and the 3CL protease. Cross-reactivity tests in animals have shown high selectivity for detection of antiviral antibodies, using both the N and 3CL antigens. Using samples of human serum from individuals previously diagnosed by PCR for COVID-19, we observed high sensitivity of the ELISA assay. Serological results with human samples also suggest that the combination of higher titers of antiviral IgG antibodies to different antigen targets may be associated with greater neutralization activity, which can be enhanced in the presence of antiviral IgM antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunologic Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/standards , Cross Reactions , Dengue Virus/immunology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/standards , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Sensitivity and Specificity , Zika Virus/immunology
8.
J Gen Virol ; 102(4)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393559

ABSTRACT

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically active species which are involved in maintaining cellular and signalling processes at physiological concentrations. Therefore, cellular components that regulate redox balance are likely to play a crucial role in viral life-cycle either as promoters of viral replication or with antiviral functions. Zinc is an essential micronutrient associated with anti-oxidative systems and helps in maintaining a balanced cellular redox state. Here, we show that zinc chelation leads to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in epithelial cells and addition of zinc restores ROS levels to basal state. Addition of ROS (H2O2) inhibited dengue virus (DENV) infection in a dose-dependent manner indicating that oxidative stress has adverse effects on DENV infection. ROS affects early stages of DENV replication as observed by quantitation of positive and negative strand viral RNA. We observed that addition of ROS specifically affected viral titres of positive strand RNA viruses. We further demonstrate that ROS specifically altered SEC31A expression at the ER suggesting a role for SEC31A-mediated pathways in the life-cycle of positive strand RNA viruses and provides an opportunity to identify drug targets regulating oxidative stress responses for antiviral development.


Subject(s)
Dengue Virus/drug effects , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Reactive Oxygen Species/pharmacology , Virus Replication , Zinc/pharmacology , Adolescent , Aedes , Animals , Caco-2 Cells , Child , Child, Preschool , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/physiology , Humans , Oxidative Stress , RNA, Viral
9.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 557, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387494

ABSTRACT

Dengue virus (DENV) is spread from human to human through the bite of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito and leads to about 100 million clinical infections yearly. Treatment options and vaccine availability for DENV are limited. Defective interfering particles (DIPs) are considered a promising antiviral approach but infectious virus contamination has limited their development. Here, a DENV-derived DIP production cell line was developed that continuously produced DENV-free DIPs. The DIPs contained and could deliver to cells a DENV serotype 2 subgenomic defective-interfering RNA, which was originally discovered in DENV infected patients. The DIPs released into cell culture supernatant were purified and could potently inhibit replication of all DENV serotypes in cells. Antiviral therapeutics are limited for many viral infection. The DIP system described could be re-purposed to make antiviral DIPs for many other RNA viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, yellow fever, West Nile and Zika viruses.


Subject(s)
Defective Viruses , Dengue Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dengue Virus/growth & development , Dengue/prevention & control , Virus Replication , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Defective Viruses/genetics , Defective Viruses/metabolism , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/genetics , Dengue Virus/metabolism , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Luminescent Proteins/biosynthesis , Luminescent Proteins/genetics , RNA, Viral/biosynthesis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Vero Cells , Viral Load
10.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 393-398, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372750

ABSTRACT

Dengue virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 coexist in dengue-endemic countries; therefore, the adoption of preventive measures is essential to control the spread of both viruses. We conducted an ecological study to compare the temporal patterns of the incidence of dengue before and during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Peru. A time-series analysis comparing the incidence of dengue using a Student's t test with variance correction was performed. Poisson regression was applied to determine the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of dengue before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The incidence of dengue was found to be increased in all endemic regions of Peru during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the highest incidences registered in Ica (IRR = 90.14), Huánuco (IRR = 38.6), and Ucayali (IRR = 23.78), with the exception of Piura (IRR = 0.83). The highest increases in the number of dengue cases per million inhabitants were in Ucayali (393.38), Tumbes (233.19), Ica (166.08), and Loreto (129.93). The gradient of dengue cases was positive in all endemic regions during the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of dengue cases per million increased during the COVID-19 pandemic throughout Peru and in several endemic regions, with the exception of Piura.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue Virus/isolation & purification , Geography , Humans , Incidence , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vector Borne Diseases/epidemiology
11.
J Gen Virol ; 102(8)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369239

ABSTRACT

Viruses may exploit the cardiovascular system to facilitate transmission or within-host dissemination, and the symptoms of many viral diseases stem at least in part from a loss of vascular integrity. The microvascular architecture is comprised of an endothelial cell barrier ensheathed by perivascular cells (pericytes). Pericytes are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play crucial roles in angiogenesis and the maintenance of microvascular integrity through complex reciprocal contact-mediated and paracrine crosstalk with endothelial cells. We here review the emerging ways that viruses interact with pericytes and pay consideration to how these interactions influence microvascular function and viral pathogenesis. Major outcomes of virus-pericyte interactions include vascular leakage or haemorrhage, organ tropism facilitated by barrier disruption, including viral penetration of the blood-brain barrier and placenta, as well as inflammatory, neurological, cognitive and developmental sequelae. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms may include direct infection of pericytes, pericyte modulation by secreted viral gene products and/or the dysregulation of paracrine signalling from or to pericytes. Viruses we cover include the herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, Human betaherpesvirus 5), the retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, HAND), the flaviviruses dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), and the coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2; causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19). We touch on promising pericyte-focussed therapies for treating the diseases caused by these important human pathogens, many of which are emerging viruses or are causing new or long-standing global pandemics.


Subject(s)
Cell Physiological Phenomena , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Pericytes/virology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/virology , Animals , Cell Communication , Dengue Virus/physiology , Disease Management , Endothelial Cells/virology , Endothelium/metabolism , Endothelium/virology , HIV/physiology , Humans , Paracrine Communication , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Physiological Phenomena
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 707287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359191

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become an international public health crisis, and the number of cases with dengue co-infection has raised concerns. Unfortunately, treatment options are currently limited or even unavailable. Thus, the aim of our study was to explore the underlying mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets for co-infection. Methods: To further understand the mechanisms underlying co-infection, we used a series of bioinformatics analyses to build host factor interaction networks and elucidate biological process and molecular function categories, pathway activity, tissue-specific enrichment, and potential therapeutic agents. Results: We explored the pathologic mechanisms of COVID-19 and dengue co-infection, including predisposing genes, significant pathways, biological functions, and possible drugs for intervention. In total, 460 shared host factors were collected; among them, CCL4 and AhR targets were important. To further analyze biological functions, we created a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and performed Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE) analysis. In addition, common signaling pathways were acquired, and the toll-like receptor and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways exerted a significant effect on the interaction. Upregulated genes were identified based on the activity score of dysregulated genes, such as IL-1, Hippo, and TNF-α. We also conducted tissue-specific enrichment analysis and found ICAM-1 and CCL2 to be highly expressed in the lung. Finally, candidate drugs were screened, including resveratrol, genistein, and dexamethasone. Conclusions: This study probes host factor interaction networks for COVID-19 and dengue and provides potential drugs for clinical practice. Although the findings need to be verified, they contribute to the treatment of co-infection and the management of respiratory disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Computational Biology/methods , Dengue/drug therapy , Dengue/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/physiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Coinfection , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Genistein/therapeutic use , Humans , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Resveratrol/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction
13.
Biosensors (Basel) ; 11(8)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354921

ABSTRACT

The global damage that a widespread viral infection can cause is evident from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of virus detection to prevent the spread of viruses has been reaffirmed by the pandemic and the associated social and economic damage. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in microscale and localized SPR (LSPR) in nanoscale virus sensing systems are thought to be useful as next-generation detection methods. Many studies have been conducted on ultra-sensitive technologies, especially those based on signal amplification. In some cases, it has been reported that even a low viral load can be measured, indicating that the virus can be detected in patients even in the early stages of the viral infection. These findings corroborate that SPR and LSPR are effective in minimizing false-positives and false-negatives that are prevalent in the existing virus detection techniques. In this review, the methods and signal responses of SPR and LSPR-based virus detection technologies are summarized. Furthermore, this review surveys some of the recent developments reported and discusses the limitations of SPR and LSPR-based virus detection as the next-generation detection technologies.


Subject(s)
Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surface Plasmon Resonance/methods , Virion/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Dengue Virus/isolation & purification , Dengue Virus/physiology , Humans , Limit of Detection , Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification , Orthomyxoviridae/physiology , Point-of-Care Systems , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virion/chemistry
14.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 101(4): 115517, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347571

ABSTRACT

Dengue and COVID-19 cocirculation presents a diagnostic conundrum for physicians evaluating patients with acute febrile illnesses, both in endemic regions and among returning travelers. We present a case of a returning traveler from Pakistan who, following repeated negative SARS-CoV-2 tests, was found to have a Dengue virus serotype 2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Dengue/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue Virus/classification , Dengue Virus/genetics , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Pakistan/epidemiology , Phylogeny , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Serogroup , Travel
15.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325784

ABSTRACT

As demonstrated with the novel coronavirus pandemic, rapid and accurate diagnosis is key to determine the clinical characteristic of a disease and to improve vaccine development. Once the infected person is identified, hematological findings may be used to predict disease outcome and offer the correct treatment. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and clinical parameters are pivotal to track infections during clinical trials and set protection status. This is also applicable for re-emerging diseases like dengue fever, which causes outbreaks in Asia and Latin America every 4 to 5 years. Some areas in the US are also endemic for the transmission of dengue virus (DENV), the causal agent of dengue fever. However, significant number of DENV infections in rural areas are diagnosed solely by clinical and hematological findings because of the lack of availability of ELISA or PCR-based tests or the infrastructure to implement them in the near future. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are a less sensitive, yet they represent a timely way of detecting DENV infections. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an association between hematological findings and the probability for an NS1-based DENV RDT to detect the DENV NS1 antigen. We also aimed to describe the hematological parameters that are associated with the diagnosis through each test.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dengue/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Asia/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Colombia/epidemiology , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/isolation & purification , Diagnostic Tests, Routine/methods , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(11): 6073-6076, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318724

ABSTRACT

The Cook Island government has made several efforts to ensure zero confirmed cases and transmission of COVID-19, especially among visiting travelers. However, the Cook Island ministry of health has to deal with the new strain of dengue fever outbreak, known as dengue fever type 2 (DEN-2), by adopting several measures to control its spread, especially in the affected parts of the subtropical country. This paper aims to describe the dengue fever response taken in Cook Island and suggest recommendations to control the risk of transmission in endemic parts of the world.


Subject(s)
Dengue/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/prevention & control , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/classification , Endemic Diseases , Humans , Mosquito Control , Polynesia/epidemiology , Serogroup
17.
Western Pac Surveill Response J ; 12(2): 38-39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296127
18.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286940

ABSTRACT

Dengue fever, caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV), has been endemic in Myanmar since 1970 and it has become a significant public health burden. It is crucial that circulating DENV strains are identified and monitored, and that their transmission efficiency and association with disease severity is understood. In this study, we analyzed DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 serotypes in 1235 serum samples collected in Myanmar between 2017 and 2019. Whole-genome sequencing of DENV-1-4 demonstrated that most DENV-1-4 strains had been circulating in Myanmar for several years. We also identified the emergence of DENV-3 genotype-I in 2017 samples, which persisted through 2018 and 2019. The emergence of the strain coincided with a period of increased DENV-3 cases and marked changes in the serotype dynamics. Nevertheless, we detected no significant differences between serum viral loads, disease severity, and infection status of individuals infected with different DENV serotypes during the 3-year study. Our results not only identify the spread of a new DENV-3 genotype into Yangon, Myanmar, but also support the importance of DENV evolution in changing the epidemic dynamics in endemic regions.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Dengue Virus/classification , Dengue Virus/genetics , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue/virology , Genotype , Adolescent , Amino Acid Substitution , Child , Child, Preschool , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/history , Dengue Virus/isolation & purification , Disease Outbreaks , Genetic Variation , Genome, Viral , History, 21st Century , Humans , Myanmar , Phylogeny , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Serogroup , Whole Genome Sequencing
19.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(2): 213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285652
20.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 43: 102132, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284575

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Before the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) arrival and its pandemic, dengue was already a significant cause of epidemics in South East Asia and Latin America. In 2020 with their cocirculation, coinfections began to be observed and reported in different countries. As expected, this syndemic is evident in different areas and deserves proper characterisation and studies in Peru. METHODS: We retrospectively assessed the clinical, epidemiological, diagnostic characteristics and outcomes in a Social Security Hospital of Chiclayo, Lambayeque, Peru, of patients that were diagnosed simultaneously with COVID-19 and dengue during May-August 2020. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients with COVID-19/dengue coinfection were identified. Of them, 60% presented thrombocytopenia, and 52% fever, among other findings. The case fatality rate in this group was 28%, being higher in those patients initially classified as severe dengue (100%), as well as in females (55%) than males (21%) (OR = 4.65; 95%CI 1.18-18.45). DISCUSSION: Co-occurrence of COVID-19/Dengue is growing as a consequence of the syndemic of these viral diseases in endemic areas, such as Latin America, and as both conditions may evolve to severe disease, their epidemiological but clinical interaction in terms of outcomes need further assessment in future studies in the region.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue Virus , Dengue , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...