Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 39
Filter
1.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 53: 102589, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237550

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Major cardiovascular events (MACEs) have been described with dengue infection. Among these MACEs, heart failure (HF) is the most common but has not been thoroughly assessed. This study aimed to evaluate the association between dengue and HF. METHODS: Under the self-controlled case-series study design, we used the Notifiable Infectious Disease dataset linkage with the National Health Insurance claims data to obtain the study subjects. All laboratory-confirmed dengue cases who were hospitalized for HF after dengue infection within one year between 2009 and 2015 in Taiwan were included. We identified the first 7 and 14 days after dengue infection as the risk intervals. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for HF were estimated by conditional Poisson regression. RESULTS: Among the 65,906 dengue patients, 230 had admission for HF after dengue infection within one year. The IRR of HF admission within the first week after dengue infection was 56.50 (95% C.I. 43.88-72.75). This risk was highest in >60 years (IRR = 59.32, 95% C.I. 45.43-77.43) and lower in 0-40 years (IRR = 25.82, 95% C.I. 2.89-231.02). The risk was nearly nine times higher among admission (for dengue infection) than among nonadmission cases (IRR 75.35 vs. 8.61, p < 0.0001). The risks increased slightly in the second week 8.55 and became less obvious after the third and fourth week. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with dengue infection have a risk of developing acute heart failure within one week, especially in >60 years, men, and dengue admission subjects. The findings emphasize the awareness of diagnosis and further appropriate treatment of HF.


Subject(s)
Dengue , Heart Failure , Male , Humans , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/etiology , Hospitalization , Research , Incidence , Dengue/complications , Dengue/epidemiology
2.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 71(5): 2269-2272, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326049

ABSTRACT

A 36-year-old Asian Indian male presented with redness and pain in his right eye of 1 week duration. He was diagnosed to have right acute anterior uveitis and had a history of being admitted at a local hospital for dengue hepatitis a month earlier. He had been on adalimumab 40 mg three weekly once and oral methotrexate 20 mg/week for human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 spondyloarthropathy and recurrent anterior uveitis. Our patient had re-activation of his anterior chamber inflammation on three distinct occasions: first, 3 weeks following recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the second after the second dose of COVID-19 vaccination, and the third after recovery from dengue fever-associated hepatitis. We propose molecular mimicry and bystander activation as the postulated mechanisms for the re-activation of his anterior uveitis. In conclusion, patients with auto-immune diseases can have recurrent ocular inflammation following COVID-19 or its vaccination or dengue fever as seen in our patient. The anterior uveitis is usually mild and responds to topical steroids. Additional immuno-suppression may not be needed. Mild ocular inflammation following vaccination should not deter individuals from getting COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue , Hepatitis A , Hepatitis , Uveitis, Anterior , Uveitis , Humans , Male , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Uveitis, Anterior/diagnosis , Uveitis, Anterior/etiology , Inflammation , HLA-B27 Antigen , Vaccination/adverse effects , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis
4.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 55: e02432022, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2270174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of possible cross-reactions between serological tests, together with the clinical similarities between dengue fever and COVID-19, can delay diagnosis and increase the risk of both COVID-19 transmission and worsening. The present study aimed to determine the possibility of cross-reactions among rapid serological tests based on clinical symptoms. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19, confirmed by RT-PCR and clinical criteria for diagnosing dengue, were recruited consecutively between September 2020 and August 2021 and underwent rapid immunochromatographic diagnostic (RID) tests for AgNS1, IgM, and IgG. Patients who tested positive for acute-phase dengue IgM and AgNS1 underwent a follow-up test after 12-30 days for diagnostic confirmation. RESULTS: A total of 43 patients were included, 38 of whom required hospital admission, and 8 received intensive care. Seven patients tested positive on the RID tests, comprising 2 NS1 positive (coinfection), one reactive for IgM and IgG (coinfection), three reactive for IgM not confirmed (false-positive), and one reactive for IgG due to previous infection. Two of the 3 patients with coinfection died. Fever, myalgia, headache, and cough were the most common clinical symptoms, while lymphopenia was the most prevalent laboratory finding. CONCLUSIONS: Cross-reactivity was found in only three patients and coinfection in another three patients, two of whom died of severe COVID-19 manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue , Humans , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin M , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin G , Antibodies, Viral
6.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg ; 117(4): 241-254, 2023 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256159

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected >370 million individuals worldwide. Dengue is endemic in many countries and leads to epidemics at frequent intervals. In the tropics and subtropics, it is possible that individuals may be concurrently infected with both dengue and SARS-CoV-2. Differentiation between the two infections may be difficult from both a clinical and laboratory perspective. We have outlined the currently published findings (as of the end of December 2021) on patients with dengue and SARS-CoV-2 co-infections and have discussed the observed outcomes and management of such patients. Co-infections were more common in males >25 y of age, fever was not universal, 30-50% had medical comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus or hypertension and the case fatality rate was 16-28%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Coinfection/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Dengue/complications , Dengue/epidemiology
8.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 70(9): 11-12, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There were widespread unconfirmed reports about the increased severity of dengue post-second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. It is known that a second dengue infection with a different strain in an individual can trigger antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). A similar phenomenon is hypothesized for severe COVID-19 infection since both dengue and COVID-19 are viral diseases with different and varying strains. However, much research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. In this context, we intended to assess the severity of dengue illness in relation to previous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, possibly the role of COVID-19 antibodies as an early predictor of severe dengue illness. OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of COVID-19 antibodies for early identification of severe dengue illness among children in the post-third-wave period of COVID-19 infection in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All hospitalized children with dengue illness were categorized as severe (shock and/or hemorrhage and/or multi-organ dysfunction) and non-severe dengue illness (dengue with or without warning signs) as per WHO definition. COVID-19 antibody titers were estimated in both groups. Clinical features and seroprevalence of COVID-19 antibodies were compared in both groups. RESULT: A total of 31 children were studied (13 severe and 18 non-severe dengue illnesses). The most common symptoms prior to presenting to the hospital included fever (100% in both groups), vomiting (85% in severe and 63% in non-severe), abdominal pain (85% in severe and 50% in non-severe), poor feeding (54% in severe and 28% in non-severe), and skin rashes (15% in severe and none in non-severe). The mean duration from the onset of fever to the first hospital visit was 4.6 days in severe illness and 5.3 days in non-severe dengue illness. The mean duration of hospitalization was 9.7 days in severe dengue illness and 4.1 days in non-severe dengue illness. While 92.3% of all severe dengue had significantly higher COVID-19 antibody titers, it was found elevated only in 44.4% of the children with non-severe dengue illness (p-value 0.0059; Yates' corrected p-value 0.0179). CONCLUSION: Clinical symptoms prior to presenting to the hospital were fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, poor oral feeding, and skin rashes. While fever, vomiting, and abdominal pain were seen commonly in both severe and non-severe dengue illnesses, the presence of skin rash during febrile phase is associated with severe dengue illness only. Hospitalized children having severe dengue had increased seroprevalence of COVID-19 antibodies (92.3%) compared to children with non-severe dengue (44.4%). However, there is no corelation of the severity of dengue illness with absolute values of COVID-19 antibody levels. Therefore, the presence of COVID-19 antibodies (previous COVID-19 infection) can be a predictor of severe illness in children with dengue especially if associated with poor oral feeding and skin rashes. The limitation of the study is its lesser sample size to conclude any definitive statement; nevertheless, the study paves way for a similar cohort of a larger sample size to draw conclusions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue , Severe Dengue , Abdominal Pain , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/epidemiology , Fever/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Severe Dengue/diagnosis , Severe Dengue/epidemiology , Vomiting
9.
BMJ ; 378: o2090, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2019988
10.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(8): e0010724, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993442

ABSTRACT

Long Covid has raised awareness of the potentially disabling chronic sequelae that afflicts patients after acute viral infection. Similar syndromes of post-infectious sequelae have also been observed after other viral infections such as dengue, but their true prevalence and functional impact remain poorly defined. We prospectively enrolled 209 patients with acute dengue (n = 48; one with severe dengue) and other acute viral respiratory infections (ARI) (n = 161), and followed them up for chronic sequelae up to one year post-enrolment, prior to the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Baseline demographics and co-morbidities were balanced between both groups except for gender, with more males in the dengue cohort (63% vs 29%, p<0.001). Except for the first visit, data on symptoms were collected remotely using a purpose-built mobile phone application. Mental health outcomes were evaluated using the validated SF-12v2 Health Survey. Almost all patients (95.8% of dengue and 94.4% of ARI patients) experienced at least one symptom of fatigue, somnolence, headache, concentration impairment or memory impairment within the first week of enrolment. Amongst patients with at least 3-months of follow-up, 18.0% in the dengue cohort and 14.6% in the ARI cohort experienced persistent symptoms. The median month-3 SF-12v2 Mental Component Summary Score was lower in patients who remained symptomatic at 3 months and beyond, compared to those whose symptoms fully resolved (47.7 vs. 56.0, p<0.001), indicating that patients who self-reported persistence of symptoms also experienced functionally worse mental health. No statistically significant difference in age, gender distribution or hospitalisation status was observed between those with and without chronic sequelae. Our findings reveal an under-appreciated burden of post-infection chronic sequelae in dengue and ARI patients. They call for studies to define the pathophysiology of this condition, and determine the efficacy of both vaccines as well as antiviral drugs in preventing such sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue , Respiratory Tract Infections , COVID-19/complications , Convalescence , Dengue/complications , Dengue/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
11.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 22(8): 515-529, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899317

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the neurological complications of dengue virus (DENV) infection and their pathogenesis. RECENT FINDINGS: Include recognition of the four different serotypes of DENV and their epidemiology as well as recognition of the expanded dengue syndrome encompassing multisystem involvement in the severe form of the disease including involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). DENV is a neurotropic virus with the ability to infect the supporting cells of the CNS. Neural injury during the acute stage of the infection results from direct neuro-invasion and/or the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement, resulting in plasma leakage and coagulopathy. Immune mechanisms have been implicated in the development of the delayed neurological sequelae through molecular mimicry. A myriad of neurological syndromes has been described as a result of the involvement of the CNS, the peripheral nervous system (PNS), or both. Neurological manifestations in DENV infection are increasingly being recognized, some of which are potentially fatal if not treated promptly. DENV encephalopathy and encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of other acute febrile encephalopathies, autoimmune encephalitides, and in cases of encephalopathy/encephalitis related to SARS-CoV2 infection, especially in dengue-endemic areas. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be occasionally encountered. Clinicians should be knowledgeable of the expanded dengue syndrome characterized by the concurrent compromise of cardiac, neurological, gastrointestinal, renal, and hematopopoietic systems. Isolated cranial nerve palsies occur rather uncommonly and are often steroid responsive. These neuropathies may result from the direct involvement of cranial nerve nuclei or nerve involvement or may be immune-mediated. Even if the diagnosis of dengue is confirmed, it is absolutely imperative to exclude other well-known causes of isolated cranial nerve palsies. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes may occur following dengue fever. The pathogenesis may be beyond the commonly observed thrombocytopenia and include cerebral vasculitis. Involvement of ocular blood vessels may cause maculopathy or retinal hemorrhages. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is uncommon and possibly related to dysregulated cytokine release phenomena. Lastly, any patient developing acute neuromuscular weakness during the course or within a fortnight of remission from dengue fever must be screened for acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), hypokalemic paralysis, or acute myositis. Rarely, a Miller-Fisher-like syndrome with negative anti-GQ1b antibody may develop.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Dengue , Encephalitis , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/pathology , Humans , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/complications , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
12.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(2): e0010134, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV) infection may be associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular effect (MACE), but a large-scale study evaluating the association between DENV infection and MACEs is still lacking. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All laboratory confirmed dengue cases in Taiwan during 2009 and 2015 were included by CDC notifiable database. The self-controlled case-series design was used to evaluate the association between DENV infection and MACE (including acute myocardial infarction [AMI], heart failure and stroke). The "risk interval" was defined as the first 7 days after the diagnosis of DENV infection and the "control interval" as 1 year before and 1 year after the risk interval. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for MACE were estimated by conditional Poisson regression. Finally, the primary outcome of the incidence of MACEs within one year of dengue was observed in 1,247 patients. The IRR of MACEs was 17.9 (95% CI 15.80-20.37) during the first week after the onset of DENV infection observed from 1,244 eligible patients. IRR were significantly higher for hemorrhagic stroke (10.9, 95% CI 6.80-17.49), ischemic stroke (15.56, 95% CI 12.44-19.47), AMI (13.53, 95% CI 10.13-18.06), and heart failure (27.24, 95% CI 22.67-32.73). No increased IRR was observed after day 14. CONCLUSIONS: The risks for MACEs are significantly higher in the immediate time period after dengue infection. Since dengue infection is potentially preventable by early recognition and vaccination, the dengue-associated MACE should be taken into consideration when making public health management policies.


Subject(s)
Dengue/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Stroke/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue Virus , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology
14.
Rev Med Virol ; 32(5): e2339, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712179

ABSTRACT

In dengue-endemic regions, the co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 and dengue is a significant health concern. Therefore, we performed a literature search for relevant papers in seven databases on 26 Spetember 2021. Out of 24 articles, the mortality rate and intensive care unit (ICU) admission were 19.1% and 7.8%, respectively. The mean hospital stay was 11.4 days. In addition, we identified two pregnancies with dengue and COVID-19 co-infection; one ended with premature rupture of membrane and intrauterine growth restriction fetus, while the other one ended with maternal mortality and intrauterine fetal death. COVID-19 and dengue co-infection had worse outcomes regarding mortality rates, ICU admission, and prolonged hospital stay. Thus, wise-decision management approaches should be adequately offered to these patients to enhance their outcomes. Establishing an early diagnosis might be the answer to reducing the estimated significant burden of these conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue , Premature Birth , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo ; 64: e13, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709614

ABSTRACT

Clinical similarities among viral diseases become even more relevant considering the current scenario, especially in Brazil, where there is a high incidence of these diseases and overlapping seasonality. We report the case of a patient with acute clinical manifestations composed of predominant respiratory symptoms and alveolar hemorrhage in which three etiologies (dengue, influenza and COVID-19) were investigated concomitantly. Only the diagnosis of dengue was confirmed. Then, the patient's immunological profile in response to stimulation of mononuclear cells with dengue virus antigen was analyzed in an attempt to identify specific characteristics that could be associated with the clinical manifestation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dengue , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 16(5): 1769-1771, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479769

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) and Dengue virus (DENV) Coinfection can be a pertinent issue in a country like India, where Dengue is endemic, and Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is also reported from all states of the country. The coinfection of these viruses has already been reported in different dengue-endemic countries like Singapore, Thailand, and Bangladesh. The outcome and the dynamics of each of the diseases may be altered in the presence of coinfection. We highlighted the critical characteristic similarities and differences between COVID-19 and Dengue infection & the specific point, which may challenge diagnosing and managing these coinfections. COVID-19 and Dengue coinfection can be deadly in combination with an atypical presentation, providing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. A high index of suspicion, early recognition of symptoms, and warning signs are vital to prevent double jeopardy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue Virus , Dengue , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coinfection/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Dengue/epidemiology
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19713, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454811

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) presents with non-specific clinical features. This may result in misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, and lead to further transmission in the community. We aimed to derive early predictors to differentiate COVID-19 from influenza and dengue. The study comprised 126 patients with COVID-19, 171 with influenza and 180 with dengue, who presented within 5 days of symptom onset. All cases were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests. We used logistic regression models to identify demographics, clinical characteristics and laboratory markers in classifying COVID-19 versus influenza, and COVID-19 versus dengue. The performance of each model was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Shortness of breath was the strongest predictor in the models for differentiating between COVID-19 and influenza, followed by diarrhoea. Higher lymphocyte count was predictive of COVID-19 versus influenza and versus dengue. In the model for differentiating between COVID-19 and dengue, patients with cough and higher platelet count were at increased odds of COVID-19, while headache, joint pain, skin rash and vomiting/nausea were indicative of dengue. The cross-validated area under the ROC curve for all four models was above 0.85. Clinical features and simple laboratory markers for differentiating COVID-19 from influenza and dengue are identified in this study which can be used by primary care physicians in resource limited settings to determine if further investigations or referrals would be required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dengue/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Adult , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Dengue/complications , Dengue/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Diarrhea/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vomiting/etiology , Young Adult
19.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 439, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dengue fever and coronavirus disease 2019 have now begun to overlap within tropical and subtropical regions. This is due to the high prevalence of dengue fever in these regions and the current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic situation. The similarity of symptoms between the two diseases can confuse diagnoses, but coinfection can also occur. CASE PRESENTATION: We present two cases of patients with dengue and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 coinfection. The first case is that of a 24-year-old Hispanic woman with acute fever, odynophagia, and diarrhea, without respiratory symptoms and with positive molecular tests for both dengue and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The second case is that of a 59-year-old Hispanic male patient with fever and respiratory symptoms of 2 weeks duration, negative molecular tests, and positive serological tests for both viruses. The clinical and epidemiological characteristics of both viral infections can help elucidate diagnoses and prognoses. CONCLUSIONS: Severe dengue infection is common in young adults, while coronavirus disease 2019 is generally asymptomatic. In older people, the severity of dengue fever will depend on their comorbidities or the infectious serotype, but coronavirus disease 2019 is consistently more severe in this group. The accurate diagnosis of both infections can better guide clinical management, as well as public health actions in transmission control, now especially important during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Dengue , Severe Dengue , Adult , Aged , Coinfection/diagnosis , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
20.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 363-367, 2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374605

ABSTRACT

The risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and dengue coinfection is increased in tropical countries; however, the extrapulmonary clinical manifestations have not been fully characterized. We report a 42-year-old woman whose clinical manifestations began with fever, diarrhea, headache, chest pain, myalgia, odynophagia, and arthralgia. Despite mild respiratory symptoms and normal chest computed tomography scan results, she was diagnosed with real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Because she had erythema and petechiae with a decreased platelet count, the dengue NS1 antigen and anti-dengue IgM/IgG test were performed, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention RT-PCR assay detected the dengue virus serotype 1 infection. Additionally, increased liver enzyme serum levels were found in the patient, who later developed hepatomegaly. Hence, the mechanism of hepatic pathology associated with SARS-CoV-2 and dengue coinfection needs further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/complications , Coinfection/diagnosis , Dengue/complications , Dengue/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/virology , Female , Fever , Hematology/methods , Humans , Lost to Follow-Up , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Serogroup , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL