Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 173
Filter
1.
Community Dent Health ; 39(2): 66-67, 2022 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875227

ABSTRACT

While the COVID-19 pandemic may no longer dominate headlines, significant pressures on the UK health and social care sector remain. Within dentistry, a profession with a long-standing association with poor mental health, practitioners continue to feel significant strain in terms of working conditions and financial pressures. They now also face a severe backlog of routine care for NHS patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics , Social Support
2.
BMJ ; 377: o1249, 2022 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865147
3.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(5): 621-629, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1863108

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused not only viral infection-related deaths, but also uncontrollable psychological problems and anxiety in different parts of society. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in adaption of a comprehensive online education period that has not been previously experienced in modern education. Aim: This cross-sectional study aims to evaluate dental students' experiences with emergency remote education practices, related levels of anxiety, and sociodemographic factors affecting anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted during the period when social isolation measures were applied at the maximum level and face-to-face education was suspended in all dentistry faculties in Turkey due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sociodemographic data and anxiety experienced by dental students were investigated using an online questionnaire. The anxiety levels were evaluated by using a 10-Item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), and attitudes of the students toward distance education were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Results: The study included 2.290 students. A total of 76.46% of these students attended to emergency remote education practices provided by their faculty. While 66.7% of students were satisfied with the transition process of their faculty to distance education, 18.4% of them found emergency remote learning to be completely unsuccessful. Mean PSS-10 score was 24.68 ± 6.74 and 94.8% of the students experienced moderate-to-high anxiety during the process. The compulsory and emergency remote education was found to significantly increase anxiety in private university students compared to public university students (P = 0.03) and in those students with low family income than the moderate and high ones (P = 0.01). There was a significant relationship between PSS-10 levels and students' anxiety about their academic performance, career plans, transition process to distance education, and their desire to continue remote theoretical online educations. The increase in these aforementioned parameters significantly decreased PSS-10 scores (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The emergency online remote education practices during the COVID-19 pandemic caused anxiety in dentistry students. It is expected that only distance education practices would be insufficient, and blended education models consisting of distance and face-to-face practices should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(9): 3386-3398, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856626

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: SARS-CoV-2 is a new Coronavirus identified as the cause of Coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19). The epidemic spread in China and beyond its borders, involving 114 countries with more than 5 million dead. On March 11, the WHO declared the spread of SARS-CoV-2 to be a pandemic and encouraged nations to adopt harsh restrictive measures. Therefore, patients more and more often turn to dental offices only for emergencies. Healthcare professionals, including dentists, are at high infectious risk. In fact, the closeness to the oral cavity and nasopharynx and the use of drills or ultrasonic devices that cause aerosol release, make dental professions at high risk of bacterial and viral infections. The way patients are treated has changed. In fact, it should be mandatory to carry out a pre-treatment telephone triage and the use of mouthwashes to reduce bacterial load. In the current pandemic, it is necessary to adopt specific safety protocols that can protect dental operators as well as limit the spread of the virus. The purpose of this review is to present an overview on ways to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 contagion in dentistry by focusing on the immediate situation as well as by looking towards the future. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To reach the review purpose, we selected a series of studies using keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" in association with "dentistry" AND "safety protocols" AND "healthcare procedures" AND "individual protection dispositive" AND "air transmission" AND "droplet". We selected papers exclusively in English language, up to 1st January 2022. RESULTS: During future phases of the pandemic, everywhere in the World, it is necessary to impose all dentistry team both a serological screening and the vaccination, as already established for all health staff in Italy. CONCLUSIONS: For own safety, it is an important for the whole dentistry category constantly update the devices and the protocols adopted, as well as monitoring the real infectious threats, which may occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aerosols , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
5.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(8)2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810108

ABSTRACT

The advancement of science and technology has brought innovation in the dental field [...].


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Spiral Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Dentistry , Technology
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809890

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of an air purifier device (professional XXl inn-561 innoliving) with HEPA 14 filter in reducing the number of suspended particles generated during dental procedures as a vector of COVID-19 transmission. The survey was conducted on 80 individuals who underwent Oral Surgery with dental Hygiene Procedures, divided into two groups based on the operational risk classification related to dental procedures: a Test Group (with application of filtering device) and a Control Group (without filtering device). All procedures were monitored throughout the clinical controls, utilising professional tools such as molecular particle counters (Lasair III 350 L 9.50 L/min), bacteriological plates (Tryptic Soy Agar), sound meters for LAFp sound pressure level (SPL) and LCpk instantaneous peak level. The rate of suspended particles, microbiological pollution and noise pollution were calculated. SPSS software was used for statistical analysis method. The results showed the higher efficacy of the TEST Group on pollution abatement, 83% more than the Control fgroup. Additionally, the contamination was reduced by 69-80%. Noise pollution was not noticeable compared to the sounds already present in the clinical environment. The addition of PAC equipment to the already existing safety measures was found to be significantly effective in further microbiological risk reduction.


Subject(s)
Air Filters , COVID-19 , Aerosols , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
7.
Dent Med Probl ; 59(1): 137-141, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780351

ABSTRACT

Dentistry schools have attempted to overcome the challenges imposed by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic through teaching via the Internet with the use of virtual platforms, designed to simulate face-to-face interaction and counteract the social isolation affecting the integral development of students. This review searched the main health databases, including MEDLINE via PubMed, Scopus and LILACS, and selected 31 articles to proceed with the research. During the pandemic, platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Zoom, Google Meet, and other similar tools allowed teachers to develop dynamic slides and dental models to simulate procedures, which played an important role in the course of mainly theoretical classes. In addition, applications such as WhatsApp allowed the rapid acquisition and sharing of useful information on a specific topic. While virtual resources facilitate the learning process through generating interest as well as providing accurate, necessary, valuable, and easily accessible information, which is constantly updated, the disadvantages of remote learning include the lack of instruments, infrastructure and materials, apart from supervision, to promote personal development and progressive evolution to directly treat patients. Another issue with regard to virtual learning is whether within a short period of time students can achieve a comparable level of practical skills as in the case of the conventional learning. In conclusion, the current pandemic has changed not only the use of technology in education, but also educational strategies for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
8.
Br Dent J ; 232(6): 355, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1762804

Subject(s)
Medicine , Dentistry
9.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265076, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742019

ABSTRACT

Aerosol generating procedures (AGPs) are defined as any procedure releasing airborne particles <5 µm in size from the respiratory tract. There remains uncertainty about which dental procedures constitute AGPs. We quantified the aerosol number concentration generated during a range of periodontal, oral surgery and orthodontic procedures using an aerodynamic particle sizer, which measures aerosol number concentrations and size distribution across the 0.5-20 µm diameter size range. Measurements were conducted in an environment with a sufficiently low background to detect a patient's cough, enabling confident identification of aerosol. Phantom head control experiments for each procedure were performed under the same conditions as a comparison. Where aerosol was detected during a patient procedure, we assessed whether the size distribution could be explained by the non-salivary contaminated instrument source in the respective phantom head control procedure using a two-sided unpaired t-test (comparing the mode widths (log(σ)) and peak positions (DP,C)). The aerosol size distribution provided a robust fingerprint of aerosol emission from a source. 41 patients underwent fifteen different dental procedures. For nine procedures, no aerosol was detected above background. Where aerosol was detected, the percentage of procedure time that aerosol was observed above background ranged from 12.7% for ultrasonic scaling, to 42.9% for 3-in-1 air + water syringe. For ultrasonic scaling, 3-in-1 syringe use and surgical drilling, the aerosol size distribution matched the non-salivary contaminated instrument source, with no unexplained aerosol. High and slow speed drilling produced aerosol from patient procedures with different size distributions to those measured from the phantom head controls (mode widths log(σ)) and peaks (DP,C, p< 0.002) and, therefore, may pose a greater risk of salivary contamination. This study provides evidence for sources of aerosol generation during common dental procedures, enabling more informed evaluation of risk and appropriate mitigation strategies.


Subject(s)
Cough , Dentistry , Aerosols , Humans , Particle Size
10.
J Dent ; 120: 104092, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739906

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify aerosol concentrations produced during different dental procedures under different mitigation processes. METHOD: Aerosol concentrations were measured by the Optical Particle Sensor (OPS) and Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during routine, time-recorded dental procedures on a manikin head in a partitioned enclosure. Four different, standardised dental procedures were repeated in triplicate for three different mitigation measures. RESULT: Both high-volume evacuation (HVE) and HVE plus local exhaust ventilation (LEV) eradicated all procedure-related aerosols, and the enclosure stopped procedure-related aerosols escaping. Aerosols recorded by the OPS and WIBS were 84 and 16-fold higher than background levels during tooth 16 FDI notation (UR6) drilling, and 11 and 24-fold higher during tooth 46 FDI notation (LR6) drilling, respectively. Ultrasonic scaling around the full lower arch (CL) or the full upper arch (CU) did not generate detectable aerosols with mitigation applied. Without mitigation the largest concentration of inhalable particles during procedures observed by the WIBS and OPS was during LR6 (139/cm3) and UR6 (28/cm3) drilling, respectively. Brief aerosol bursts were recorded during drilling procedures with HVE, these did not occur with LEV, suggesting LEV provides protection against operator errors. Variation was observed in necessary fallow times (49 - 280 minutes) without mitigation, while no particles remained airborne when mitigation was utilised. CONCLUSION: This data demonstrates that correctly positioned HVE or LEV is effective in preventing airborne spread and persistence of inhalable particles originating from dental AGPs. Additionally, a simple enclosure restricts the spread of aerosols outside of the operating area. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Employing correctly positioned HVE and LEV in non-mechanically ventilated clinics can prevent the dispersal and persistence of inhalable airborne particles during dental AGPs. Moreover, using enclosures have the additive effect of restricting aerosol spread outside of an operating area.


Subject(s)
Dentistry , Ultrasonics , Aerosols
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736905

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have documented the high prevalence of burnout among medicine and dentistry students, with potentially catastrophic consequences for both students and patients. Both environmental and personality factors play a part in burnout; perfectionism, a common trait in medicine students' personalities, has been linked to psychological distress and increasing students' vulnerability to burnout. Self-compassion, i.e., treating oneself kindly through hardship, has recently emerged as a buffer between perfectionism and psychological distress. While using a novel three-factor conceptualization of perfectionism (BIG3), this study aims to analyze if self-compassion has a protective role in the relationship between perfectionism and burnout, in a sample of medicine and dentistry students, through mediation analysis. We found that self-compassion significantly mediated the relationship between all three forms of perfectionism and burnout: as a partial mediator in self-critical and rigid perfectionism, as well as a full mediator in narcissistic perfectionism. Our findings underline self-compassion's relevance in burnout prevention and management, supporting its use as an intervention target in burnout reduction programs and strategies.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Perfectionism , Students, Medical , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Dentistry , Humans , Portugal/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(10)2020 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725612

ABSTRACT

The aim of this pilot study was to describe the advantages of telemedicine (TM) in dental practice during the current national emergency condition due to the Covid-19 dissemination. At Department of Oral Surgery and Pathology-Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, regional reference center for Covid-19-two groups of patients were determined: patients with urgent conditions (group U) and patients in follow-up (group F). Both groups were instructed to implement remote consultations using a messaging service (WhatsApp Messenger, WhatsApp Inc., Mountain View, California, USA) to send photos. A total of 418 photos were collected by 57 patients. Thirty-four photos were obtained by five patients in the U group after surgical procedures. All patients sent photos on the established evening, except for two patients who sent two photos outside the set days. In the F group, 384 photos were collected by 52 patients. None of them sent more photos than the number that was established by the protocol. Telemedicine allowed a monitoring of all patients, reducing costs and limiting human contact, decreasing the risk of Covid-19 dissemination.


Subject(s)
Community Dentistry , Coronavirus Infections , Dental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Mouth Diseases/diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Delivery of Health Care , Dental Clinics , Dental Health Services/organization & administration , Dentistry , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Pilot Projects , Public Health Dentistry , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580862

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the limited in-person availability of oral health care providers resulted in an unprecedented utilization of the teledentistry tool. This paper reviews how Canadian organizations supported teledentistry and what can be expected about its usage in the post-pandemic era. An environmental scan across relevant Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial organizations was conducted to review pertinent publicly available documents, including dental regulators' or associations' COVID-19 guidance documents, government documents, and media articles. Almost all jurisdictions promoted teledentistry for triaging dental emergencies and screening patients for COVID-19 symptoms but not even half of them have developed guidelines in terms of modalities of usage, handling of personal information, informed consent process, or maintaining standards of practice. During the COVID-19 recovery phase, these advances across Canada will support in developing a comprehensive guidance for teledentistry and possibly specific codes for its utilization. This can create a niche for teledentistry as an adjunct to the main stream dental care delivery where some visits can always be accommodated virtually, reducing disparities in oral healthcare between rural and urban communities. Ultimately, this can potentially make oral health care delivery more effective, efficient, and environmentally friendly in Canada.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dentistry , Telemedicine , Canada , Dentistry/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Br Dent J ; 231(12): 741-746, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577660

ABSTRACT

Collecting information in preparation for a domiciliary visit can identify potential barriers to treatment and allow for appropriate planning and mitigation of treatment risks. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way dental professionals can work. Prior identification can eliminate unnecessary visits and so reduce the risk of potential COVID-19 transmission between dental professionals and patients receiving domiciliary dental care. This article will explain two documents: the Domiciliary Patient Information Sheet (DPIS) and Domiciliary Risk Assessment (DRA). Case studies will be used to demonstrate the importance of the DPIS and DRA implementation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Dentistry , Humans , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther ; 37: 102682, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562137

ABSTRACT

Biophotonics is defined as the combination of biology and photonics (the physical science of the light). It is a general term for all techniques that deal with the interaction between biological tissues/cells and photons (light). Biophotonics offers a great variety of techniques that can facilitate the early detection of diseases and promote innovative theragnostic approaches. As the COVID-19 infection can be transmitted due to the face-to-face communication, droplets and aerosol inhalation and the exposure to saliva, blood, and other body fluids, as well as the handling of sharp instruments, dental practices are at increased risk of infection. In this paper, a literature review was performed to explore the application of Biophotonics approaches in Dentistry focusing on the COVID-19 pandemic and how they can contribute to avoid or minimize the risks of infection in a dental setting. For this, search-related papers were retrieved from PubMED, Scielo, Google Schoolar, and American Dental Association and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention databases. The body of evidence currently available showed that Biophotonics approaches can reduce microorganism load, decontaminate surfaces, air, tissues, and minimize the generation of aerosol and virus spreading by minimally invasive, time-saving, and alternative techniques in general. However, each clinical situation must be individually evaluated regarding the benefits and drawbacks of these approaches, but always pursuing less-invasive and less aerosol-generating procedures, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , Photochemotherapy , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Photochemotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
16.
J Dent ; 117: 103914, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549905

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the patient experience of Remote Clinical Consultations (RCCs) for head and neck cancer and cleft lip and palate patients undergoing specialist restorative dentistry treatment in the context of a secondary care service. METHODS: An online survey was designed; all ninety three patients were invited to participate in its completion following a video or telephone remote clinical consultation with one restorative consultant in Addenbrooke's Hospital between August 2020 and April 2021. The video consultations were carried out via NHS England's Attend Anywhere platform. RESULTS: Sixty three responses were received. Over 70% of patients valued a video or telephone remote clinical consultation rather than an in-person attendance. Patients reported a good experience and would recommend a remote clinical consultation instead of an in-person attendance if no treatment would likely be required. Those who were less likely to recommend a remote clinical consultation were those who had difficulties logging-in to the remote platform or had technical issues. CONCLUSION: While a number of patients still would have preferred a face-to-face attendance, both telephone and video remote consultations were highly valued by patients, and the overall patient experience was that of acceptance. Benefits of remote consultations perceived by patients included having set time to discuss concerns and queries, becoming familiar with a clinician prior to any treatment, saving time, minimising travel and reducing expenses. Barriers to a positive experience included technical difficulties. This survey contributes to the evidence supporting remote clinical consultations as a practical way of delivering specialist consultations in restorative dentistry, it highlights this virtual process largely relates to the practicalities of service provision and highlights the use of remote consultations for specific appointments. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates patient feedback to a strategy implemented due to adaptations in working methods required as result of the Covid-19 pandemic. Patients were found to have a positive, accepting experience of both telephone and video remote clinical consultations. the study identifies a high patient acceptability and ability to overcome some of the disadvantages of an in-person attendance including saving time, travel and associated expenses while also contributing to a reduction in CO2 emissions and potentially improving clinical efficiency and capacity. These findings add to existing evidence and are indicative that remote consultations provide a practical way of delivering specialist communication in restorative dentistry as part of a unique patient pathway.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cleft Lip , Cleft Palate , Remote Consultation , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 60(3): 368, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549662
18.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5437237, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546594

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed at assessing the impact of teledentistry, its application, and trends in uplifting dental practice and clinical care around the world. Material and Methods. The present observational study comprised of an electronic survey distributed among dental professionals around the globe. The validated survey form consisted of a total 26 questions with 5-point Likert scale response. The questionnaire used was divided into four domains: usefulness of teledentistry for patients, its usefulness in dental practice, its capacity to improve the existing practice, and the concerns attached to its use. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS-25. ANOVA test was used to assess the effect of independent variables on dependent variables. A p value of ≤0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 506 dental professionals participated in the study with the response rate of 89.39%. More than half of the participants (50-75%) endorsed that teledentistry is a useful tool for improving clinical practice as well as patient care. Two-thirds of the participants (69.96%) considered that teledentistry would reduce cost for the dental practices. On the other hand, about 50-70% of dental professionals expressed their concerns regarding the security of the data and consent of patients. The most preferred communication tool for teledentistry was reported to be videoconference followed by phone. The majority of participants recommended the use of teledentistry in the specialty of oral medicine, operative dentistry, and periodontics. There was a significant difference between the age, experience of dentists, and their qualifications with domains of teledentistry. CONCLUSIONS: The overall impact of dental professionals towards teledentistry was positive with adequate willingness to incorporate this modality in their clinical practice. However, the perceived concerns pertaining to teledentistry are significant impediments towards its integration within the oral health system. An in-depth study of its business model and cost-benefit needs of time, especially in the context of developing countries, in order to avail the optimum benefits of teledentistry.


Subject(s)
Dentistry/methods , Dentistry/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Asia , Attitude of Health Personnel , Dentists , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Young Adult
19.
J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent ; 39(3): 316-320, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restrictions on routine dental procedures involving aerosols during COVID-19 have resulted in a significant increase in the suffering of pediatric patients. AIM: The study reported the alternative measures followed in our department using SDF during the COVID era when routine elective dental procedures were prohibited. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The retrospective data of patients aged 2-13 years with carious molar teeth who were treated with silver diamine fluoride without (Group 1) or with (Group 2) caries excavation were collected. RESULTS: One thousand and seventy-two patients (646 males and 426 females) with 2459 carious molar were treated. On follow-up assessment at 3 months, 28 teeth in Group 1 and 21 teeth in Group 2 showed progression of carious lesion using International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS II criteria). Out of these failure cases, 32 (1.8%) teeth were primary and 17 (2.5%) were permanent. Complete relief in sensitivity/pain on stimulation was reported in 2381 teeth (96.83%), whereas in 78 (3.17%) teeth, mild sensitivity/pain on stimulation was reported. The average time consumed during treatment per tooth in Group 1 was 5.04 min and in Group 2 was 5.78 min. CONCLUSION: SDF application can be carried out as a nonaerosol-generating procedure and is a simple technique for children and clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Caries , Aerosols , Cariostatic Agents , Child , Dental Caries/drug therapy , Dentistry , Female , Fluorides, Topical , Humans , Male , Quaternary Ammonium Compounds , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Silver Compounds
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL