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1.
Wiad Lek ; 76(4): 772-777, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237626

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: To present a comparative analysis of the educational technologies effectiveness that were used in the process of professional training of masters of dentistry during quarantine restrictions and martial law. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: To perform the set tasks, the following the empirical methods of scientific research were used: quantitative data were collected based on analyzing the results of students' educational achievements, as well as implementing special questionnaire that was sent to the students of the Faculty of Dentistry of NMU; qualitative data were collected with the help of several focus groups formed from students and teachers of the faculty. Analysis was undertaken using statistical methods (Pearson's test), and qualitative data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: Results: This paper analyzes the effectiveness of educational technologies used during quarantine restrictions and martial law, the role of phantom classes in providing professional training of dentistry specialists, summarizes the results of a comprehensive analysis of scientific literature, teaching experience at the dental faculty and the results of sociological research (student surveys, discussion in focus groups). CONCLUSION: Conclusions: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and the full-scale war unleashed by the russian federation in Ukraine forced to quickly find and implement mixed forms of teaching future masters of dentistry, which, in combination with digital technologies, enables implementing high-quality and effective training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Students , Dentistry
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 288, 2023 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early- and mid-career academics in medicine, dentistry and health sciences are integral to research, education and advancement of clinical professions, yet experience significant illbeing, high attrition and limited advancement opportunities. OBJECTIVES: Identify and synthesise published research investigating challenges and opportunities related to diversity and inclusion, as experienced by early and mid-career academics employed in medicine, dentistry and health sciences disciplines. DESIGN: Rapid review. DATA SOURCES: OVID Medline, Embase, APA PsycInfo, CINAHL and Scopus. METHODS: We systematically searched for peer reviewed published articles within the last five years, investigating challenges and opportunities related to diversity and inclusion, as experienced by early and mid-career academics employed in medicine, dentistry and health sciences. We screened and appraised articles, then extracted and synthesised data. RESULTS: Database searches identified 1162 articles, 11 met inclusion criteria. Studies varied in quality, primarily reporting concepts encompassed by professional identity. There were limited findings relating to social identity, with sexual orientation and disability being a particularly notable absence, and few findings relating to inclusion. Job insecurity, limited opportunities for advancement or professional development, and a sense of being undervalued in the workplace were evident for these academics. CONCLUSIONS: Our review identified overlap between academic models of wellbeing and key opportunities to foster inclusion. Challenges to professional identity such as job insecurity can contribute to development of illbeing. Future interventions to improve wellbeing in academia for early- and mid-career academics in these fields should consider addressing their social and professional identity, and foster their inclusion within the academic community. REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework ( https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/SA4HX ).


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Workplace , Humans , Female , Male , Forecasting , Dentistry
3.
Clin Oral Investig ; 27(Suppl 1): 33-44, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305585

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Aerosols and splatter are routinely generated in dental practice and can be contaminated by potentially harmful bacteria or viruses such as SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, preprocedural mouthwashes containing antiseptic agents have been proposed as a potential measure for infection control in dental practice. This review article aims to summarize the clinical (and, if insufficient, preclinical) evidence on preprocedural mouthwashes containing antiseptic agents and to draw conclusions for dental practitioners. METHODS: Literature on preprocedural mouthwashes for reduction of bacterial or viral load in dental aerosols was searched and summarized. RESULTS: Preprocedural mouthwashes, particularly those containing chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), or essential oils (EO), can significantly reduce the bacterial load in dental aerosols. With respect to viruses such as HSV-1, there are too little clinical data to draw any clear recommendations. On the other hand, clinical data is consolidating that CPC-containing mouthwashes can temporarily reduce the intraoral viral load and infectivity in SARS-CoV-2 positive individuals. Nevertheless, potential risks and side effects due to regular antiseptic use such as ecological effects or adaptation of bacteria need to be considered. CONCLUSIONS: The use of preprocedural mouthwashes containing antiseptics can be recommended according to currently available data, but further studies are needed, particularly on the effects on other viruses besides SARS-CoV-2. When selecting a specific antiseptic, the biggest data basis currently exists for CHX, CPC, EO, or combinations thereof. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Preprocedural mouthwashes containing antiseptics can serve as part of a bundle of measures for protection of dental personnel despite some remaining ambiguities and in view of potential risks and side effects.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents, Local , COVID-19 , Oils, Volatile , Humans , Mouthwashes/therapeutic use , Dentists , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Professional Role , Respiratory Aerosols and Droplets , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/therapeutic use , Chlorhexidine/therapeutic use , Bacteria , Infection Control , Dentistry , Cetylpyridinium/therapeutic use
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 78, 2023 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2254827

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Traditionally, dental students learn the skills for dentist-patient interaction and communication via on-site contact with patients, when they start clinical training. However, preclinical students (who have not started clinical practice) have fewer chances to realize the context of dentist-patient interaction. It has remained unclear if a gamification approach via digital media, i.e., a computer role-playing game, can help to learn clinical communication skills. The intervention-based study investigates the effectiveness of the clinical dentist-patient communication (CDPC) game on students' motivation, beliefs, and self-efficacy to learn behavioral issues of clinical communication. METHODS: Fifty-two dental students (Preclinical group) and 18 dental interns and dentists (Clinical group) played the CDPC game, which consists of 16 scenes of clinical context about dentist-patient communication (less than 40 min for playing), via web browsers. Pre-test and post-test questionnaires were used to assess their motivation, beliefs, and self-efficacy to learn behavioral issues of clinical communication. The effectiveness was examined by comparing pre-test and post-test scores within-subject and between-group difference was compared between Preclinical and Clinical groups, via non-parametric statistical tests. RESULTS: (A) In the Preclinical group, participants showed a significant increase in motivation and self-efficacy in learning after playing the CDPC game (p < 0.05, adjusted of multiple comparison). (B) In contrast, the Clinical group did not show a significant difference before vs. after playing the game. (C) After playing the game, the Preclinical group showed a significant association between motivation and beliefs (p = 0.024) and between motivation and self-efficacy (p = 0.001); the Clinical group showed a significant association between motivation and beliefs (p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence suggests that gamification of learning helps preclinical students to understand the context of clinical dentist-patient interaction and increase their motivation and self-efficacy to learn behavioral issues of clinical communication.


Subject(s)
Communication , Dentist-Patient Relations , Gamification , Internet , Simulation Training , Humans , Dentistry , Learning , Motivation , Students, Dental , Education, Dental
6.
Br Dent J ; 234(3): 148-150, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241696

ABSTRACT

Dental education has been delivered in Queen's University for just over 100 years, with the Dental School celebrating its centenary in 2020. During that time, the undergraduate curriculum has evolved greatly, through innovations in the delivery of teaching and assessment driven by changes in educational practice, developing technologies and, most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout all of these changes, our focus remains on our students, their wellbeing, and their development as lifelong learners for a career in the dental profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Humans , Pandemics , Universities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Dentistry , Teaching
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2234845

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this research was to analyze the economic, social, and emotional repercussions among Galician dentists (Spain) as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey was filled out by 347 professionals. After verifying the survey's reliability using Cronbach's alpha = 0.84, the professional activity and emotional state of the participants were assessed based on aspects related to their personal and family data. The economic impact of the pandemic was considerable, and all participants experienced a decrease in income. In total, 72% of the participants considered that working with personal protective equipment (PPE) made their clinical activities difficult, and 60% expressed concern about being infected during their professional practice. Among the professionals, women (p = 0.005), and separated, divorced, or single professionals (p = 0.003) were the most strongly affected. Separated or divorced professionals were the group that most frequently raised the need to make a radical change in their lives. Finally, it was observed that the emotional consequences varied substantially in the lives of these professionals, mainly among female dentists (p = 0.010), separated and divorced men (p = 0.000), and those with fewer years of professional practice (p = 0.021). The COVID-19 pandemic had an economic impact, due to the decrease in the number of patients and hours of attention, as well as an emotional impact, mostly expressed in the form of sleep disorders and stress. The most vulnerable professionals were women and professionals with fewer years of experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , Female , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Reproducibility of Results , Dentistry
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1040175, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2228800

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has a significant impact on dental medicine. The present study aims to overview dental-related research on COVID-19 by visual mapping method. Methods: We analyzed the publications in the "Dentistry Oral Surgery Medicine" category in the Web of Science core collection. On June 10, 2022, we conducted an advanced search using the items TS = ("Novel coronavirus 2019" or "COVID 19" or "Coronavirus disease 2019" or "2019-nCOV" or "SARS-CoV-2" or "coronavirus-2") and WC = ("Dentistry Oral Surgery medicine") to screen publications in the dental field that focus on COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2. The contributions of authors, journals, institutions, and countries were described using Microsoft Excel 2010 and VOSviewer. The keywords co-occurring analysis and references analysis were visualized using VOSviewer and CiteSpace. Results: A total of 1,732 papers were identified between 2020 and 2022. The United States, the United Kingdom, and Brazil were three major contributors to this field. Univ São Paulo (Brazil) ranked first with 55 publications in this field. Martelli Junior, Hercilio from Universidade Jose do Rosario Vellano (Brazil) was the most prolific author with 19 publications. Oral Diseases and British Dental Journal were the two most productive journals. The central topics were dental practice and infection control, oral manifestation related to COVID-19, dental education and online learning, teledentistry, and mental health problems. Conclusion: The growth rate of publications regarding dental research on COVID-19 has risen sharply. Research topics shifted from "Dental practice and infection control, oral manifestation related to COVID-19" in 2020 to "Dental education and online learning, teledentistry, mental health problems," which are three important research topics for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Brazil , Bibliometrics , Dentistry
9.
Int J Prosthodont ; 35(6): 718-723, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2203654

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare predoctoral student performance in restorative dentistry related to curricular changes implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and to evaluate the impact of remote education on performance in didactic and preclinical examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 172 students, all members of the DMD graduating classes from 2017 to 2021. Scores in the Final Restorative Treatment (FRTx) course, subdivided into didactic and preclinical lab work, and the OSCEs were assessed and compared between pre-pandemic students and during-pandemic students. RESULTS: Performance in the preclinical lab exercises was statistically significantly higher in the during-pandemic cohort than in the pre-pandemic cohort after adjusting for students' gender and admission scores. Performance in restorative dentistry as measured by the OSCE was not statistically different among during-pandemic students compared to the pre-pandemic students. It was observed that students were more efficient and engaged during the more limited lab sessions with the increased student-to-faculty ratio that allowed for more feedback. CONCLUSION: Although virtual education cannot replace in-person experiences, this model served students satisfactorily during the COVID-19 pandemic, with added support structures such as flexible scheduling, interactive sessions, and additional small-group discussions to maintain academic performance in predoctoral education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Dental , Humans , Dentistry , Pandemics , Educational Measurement , Dentists
10.
Prim Dent J ; 11(4): 94-98, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2195535

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the benefits which digital technology offers to all aspects of dental practice and education. This paper provides an overview of how digital technology has enhanced clinical and administrative procedures within dental practice, including computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM), digital radiography, 3D printing, patient records, electronic patient referrals and electronic communications from dental practices. It then considers the development of teledentistry (mHealth) and its benefits in enabling distant consultations with patients, who for one reason or another are unable to visit dental practices easily. It then goes on to consider how and why digital dental distance learning materials were provided to general dental practitioners in England by the Department of Health (DoH) (England) and how they evolved. Finally, this paper considers the use of digital technology in dental education by dental schools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dentists , Humans , Computer-Aided Design , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dental Prosthesis Design/methods , Dentistry , Pandemics , Professional Role , United Kingdom
11.
J Law Med Ethics ; 49(1): 89-91, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096544
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the strengthening of the earlier stressors and the appearance of new pandemic-related stressors. Many students of dentistry fit the profile of a group who are particularly susceptible to stress related to the pandemic. Thus, it was necessary to implement preventive activities, reducing their stress perception. This was understood as a means of significantly influencing the student's well-being, thus improving the quality of education. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the impacts of implemented preventive activities on stress perception among students of dentistry during the pandemic, as well as their influence on this assessment of the selected students' personal experiences regarding the pandemic. METHODS: The study was performed one year after the outbreak of the pandemic on students of dentistry at Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland. It consisted of the completion of a self-designed, voluntary, anonymous, online questionnaire. The respondent's task was to assess the influences of implemented preventive activities on stress perception using a five-point scale. The activities were divided into external (national, global) and internal (institutional). The material was statistically analysed for all students, including pre-clinical and clinical groups. Additionally, the impact of the selected students' personal experiences regarding the COVID-19 pandemic on the assessment was studied. RESULTS: All preventive activities (in total) significantly reduced stress perception (p ≤ 0.001), but the intensity of their impacts (mean rank) was different. The most highly assessed activities were all external preventive activities, with the greatest intensity belonging to the prospect of receiving vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. The remaining external activities were the prospect of developing an effective COVID-19 treatment and the increase in knowledge about SARS-CoV-2. The internal activities were assessed and ascribed lower positions, with the exception of the theoretical classes held online. This activity was placed slightly lower than the highest-rated activity, the prospect of receiving vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: The studied preventive activities reduced stress perception with different levels of intensity. The highest-ranked activities were external activities. One exception was the theoretical classes held online, an internal activity. Due to the lower impact of the internal activities and the ability to modify them by the educators, there is a need to strengthen their effectiveness. The possibility of monitoring and tailoring some preventive activities to the students' needs was the practical aspect of the conducted study. Students' personal experiences related to the COVID-19 pandemic influenced their assessment of the preventive activities, in some cases significantly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dentistry , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
13.
JDR Clin Trans Res ; 7(1_suppl): 25S-30S, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043093

ABSTRACT

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER STATEMENT: This perspective is intended to stimulate thoughts by clinicians, researchers, and educators about needed trends to the dental profession. With consideration of changes needed within the dental profession, improvements and implementation of diagnostic coding and value-based care could result in improved oral health for numerous Americans.


Subject(s)
Oral Health , Organizations , Dentistry , Humans , United States
14.
Br Dent J ; 233(6): 491, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042316
15.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 424, 2022 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic challenged all healthcare providers including dental practitioners. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the dental practitioners' perceptions and attitudes towards the impacts of COVID-19 on their professional practice, career decision and patient care. METHODS: Data was collected from dental practitioners registered in New South Wales (NSW), Australia using an online survey. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Responses received from 206 dental practitioners revealed their perceptions and attitudes towards COVID-19 infection risk, clinical guidelines, and measures adopted to deliver patient care. Majority of participants perceived the risk of infection in dentistry was higher compared with other health professionals. Most dental practices have followed guidelines received from professional associations and adopted multiple measures such as providing hand sanitizer, social distancing, and risk screen, to ensure safe delivery of oral health care. Over 80% of dental practitioners raised concerns on patients' accessibility to dental care during the pandemic. Despite tele-dentistry was introduced, almost half of the participants did not recognize tele-dentistry as an effective alternative. Moreover, negative impacts of COVID-19 pandemic on dental practitioner's professional career have been reported, including lower practice safety, reduction in working hours and income. Noteworthy, one quarter of participants even considered changing their practice environment, moving sectors or even leaving their career in dentistry. However, majority of the dental practitioners are willing to stay in their current practice environment and continue their career in dentistry. Our observations demonstrate the systematic disruption to dental practice faced in Australia due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Providing dental practitioners with timely educational training and support is important to minimise negative impacts of the challenges and to optimise dental care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Sanitizers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentistry , Dentists , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Role , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 394, 2022 09 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID19 pandemic, the Latvian government issued first absolute restrictions (elective treatments prohibited, only emergency care) and later relative restrictions (preference for non-aerosol-generating procedures (AGP) and emergency care) on dental care. This study aims to assess the impact of these restrictions on the decision made by Latvian dentists about caries treatment. METHODS: A Survey-based cross-sectional study was used. A minimum sample size of 174 dentists was estimated for national representativeness (N = 1524). The questionnaire was developed by experts and sent three times via email to Latvian dentists from July to September 2020 and was also delivered in printed form at two national conferences in September and October 2020. Descriptive statistics were calculated. RESULTS: We received 373 completed questionnaires, with a total response rate of 24.5%. Under the recommendation to reduce AGP for the treatment of uncomplicated caries, 10% of the dentists stated that they would stop attending, 54% would only attend emergencies, and 36% would attend as usual. Under prohibition, the percentages are 15%, 74%, and 11%, respectively. Regarding the type of treatment, more than 75% would opt to proceed with selective caries removal for both primary and permanent teeth and 10% for extraction. CONCLUSION: Latvian dentists are willing to treat patients with caries during the pandemic and state that they prefer to use non- or minimally invasive and less aerosol-generating methods for caries treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Caries , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Caries/etiology , Dental Caries/therapy , Dentistry , Dentists , Humans
17.
BMJ ; 378: o2135, 2022 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020000
18.
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol ; 29(3): e58-e61, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2006743

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 affected healthcare professionals globally, especially dentists, which is airborne and transmitted through contact. Most dental procedures are aerosol generated and these aerosols in dental practice tend to transmit acute respiratory infections like COVID-19. Recently, a few authors recommended using the aerosol box to reduce the aerosol count in a dental setting. However, the study aims to describe and recommend a reformed aerosol box desand to practice safe dentistry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dentistry , Health Personnel , Humans , Respiratory Aerosols and Droplets , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 20(1): 331-338, 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974627

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study compared the success of dental students with flipped classroom and traditional classroom learning in the restorative dentistry course for the first time at the Faculty of Dentistry of Reims during the 2019- 2020 academic year, influenced by the Covid-19 pandemic, and analysed the correlation with students' feelings. The use of an active learning method can improve success during final exams and increase the motivation of students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The same teacher taught half of the restorative dentistry course in the flipped classroom approach and the other half as traditional classroom. For the flipped classroom, students were required to complete their homework online before the face-to-face sessions. An exam at the beginning and the end of the semester was conducted with questions about concepts learned with each learning method. Statistical analysis was performed using a t-test at the 0.05 significance level. A questionnaire on satisfaction was conducted to determine the students' opinion on this new learning method in the flipped classroom compared to the traditional classroom. RESULTS: The flipped classroom learning method enabled students to achieve better results on the final exam, with a statistically significant difference compared to traditional classroom learning. Student responses to the satisfaction questionnaire showed an increase in motivation and interest in the lessons and correspond to the increase in exam success. CONCLUSION: The use of the flipped classroom for lower cognitive-level activities is more appreciated by students and yields better results than knowledge acquisition in the traditional classroom.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum , Dentistry , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning/methods
20.
Br Dent J ; 233(2): 87-88, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972580

ABSTRACT

Digital technology is transforming how dentistry will be delivered in the future. Adopting digital opportunities will enable staff and patients to confidently navigate this new digital environment. We need to consider how dentistry is identifying and developing digital talent, building digital competence and future-proofing our teams. It also implies there must be a fundamental culture change in the way the profession collaborates with patients, clinicians, service commissioners and policymakers to deliver a sustainable digital transformation.


Subject(s)
Dentistry , Humans
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