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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785661

ABSTRACT

Domestic violence (DV) is an important public health topic with a high prevalence in society. Dentists are also frontline responders to DV, as they not only treat victims of DV with dental injuries, but they can also screen for the presence of DV because they see patients for regular check-ups. Using the WHO definition, which describes domestic violence as intimate partner violence, 17 papers could be included in our analyses. The results of this review clearly indicated that although dentists, as members of the health care sector, are important frontline responders to DV, they are neither trained adequately at medical school nor do most feel competent enough to ask victims about DV or support them as needed. DV is often not taught at dentistry schools at all. The aims of this review were to provide an overview of existing literature on dentists' knowledge and beliefs regarding DV, whether and how DV is taught in medical education and to give recommendations on how to improve the education of dentists on this topic. Based on our findings, we recommend that DV education should be mandatory at dentistry schools and in further training for dentists with a focus on communication with victims, how DV can be identified and how to support victims well.


Subject(s)
Domestic Violence , Dentists , Domestic Violence/prevention & control , Humans , Prevalence
2.
Prim Dent J ; 11(1): 66-71, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779563

ABSTRACT

This article details the unusual presentation of an oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) referred to secondary care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The patient's chief complaints were trismus and pain from a lower left partially erupted third molar, which was assumed to be pericoronitis-related on referral. Intra-oral examination was difficult due to the patient's symptoms, but radiographic assessment of an orthopantomogram (OPG) showed a pathological fracture and poorly defined radiolucency in the lower left third molar region. Oral SCC was diagnosed after biopsy, and surgery and radiotherapy were swiftly carried out despite COVID-19 restrictions. General dental practitioners (GDPs) remain the frontline healthcare professionals in the screening and detection of oral cancer through detailed history taking and examinations. Primary care dental practitioners should always remain vigilant with patients at risk of oral cancer. Prompt referral to secondary care for further investigations and management should be made when a suspicion of oral malignancy is raised, to ensure a better treatment outcome. Video consultations have had their merits in dentistry amid the coronavirus pandemic, but face-to-face consultations are essential to establish quality patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Mouth Neoplasms , COVID-19/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Dentists , Diagnosis, Oral , Humans , Mouth Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Professional Role
3.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(6): 2179-2187, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776797

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly worldwide since it has been first identified in November 2018. It is transmissible via air droplets from infected individuals. Close contact between dentists and patients has aggravated the pandemic situation in Russia. It is necessary to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 during dental appointments by adhering to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Questionnaires were developed to assess levels of COVID-19 infection and preventive measures in private and state-funded dental practices in Moscow and other cities in Russia. Two questionnaires were developed to assess the COVID-19 situation among dental professionals and their patients. The first, for dentists, included four domains: demographic data, signs, and symptoms of COVID-19 experienced by dentists, personal protective measures taken by dentists, and presence or absence of dental practice during the pandemic. For dentists' patients, the second included domains regarding their health status after their dental appointment. 1,500 questionnaires were sent to different cities and regions of Russia; 1,011 questionnaires (67.4%) were returned. We used statistical observation (monitoring) and clustering to analyze the data. The x2 was used to check the significance level. RESULTS: We found a direct relationship between those patients who contracted COVID-19 after dental treatment by those dentists who did not follow recommended measures in the dental clinic. However, patients were less likely to become infected after dental treatment by those dentists who followed the measures, such as the disinfection of surfaces and dental equipment several times a day, the wearing of medical masks by all patients, and the airing of the dental office after each patient for 10 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Dentists wearing an FFP2 or FFP3 respirator, as well as a sterile disposable microfiber medical gown, prevented their patients from becoming infected with COVID-19 at dental appointments and, as a result, the spread of the virus. A key aspect of this study is its knowledge regarding preventive measures against COVID-19. The findings of this study can potentially help in formulating strategies to reduce the prevalence of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dentists , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
4.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 107, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770521

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, ordinary dental services were sustained in Nepal. Because a dental practice is considered to involve a high risk of infection, the needs of dentists should be identified, and demand-driven support should be provided. The purpose of this study was to investigate the situation and needs of dentists during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to guide demand-driven support. First, we investigated how the situation of Nepali dentists differed according to their types of practices between private clinics and university/government hospitals. Second, we assessed the characteristics of dentists demanding four types of support: financial, material, technical, and guidelines/guidance support. METHODS: A cross-sectional online questionnaire survey was conducted between July 28th and August 7th 2020. Closed-ended questions were prepared regarding behavior, material availability, economic and psychological impacts, training, and the main support dentists wanted to receive. The situation of dentists between private clinics and university/government hospitals was determined using a chi-squared test for each variable. To examine the association between the characteristics of dentists and four types of support, multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for each variable. RESULTS: There were 352 dentists (137 males and 215 females) included in the analysis. Private clinic dentists experienced a bigger economic impact and demanded financial support that 45.5% of them did not receive a salary, compared to 18.9% in university/government hospitals. On the contrary, university/government hospitals experienced lack of PPE and demanded material support that 79.8% had personal protective equipment, compared to 92.5% in private clinics. Financial support was demanded significantly more by male than female dentists (ORs = 5.56; 95% CI = 2.96-10.45). Material support was demanded significantly more by dentists who received training regarding COVID-19 management (ORs = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.01-3.81). Technical support was demanded significantly less by male dentists (ORs = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.23-0.83). Guideline/guidance support was demanded significantly more by dentists who answered that Nepal Dental Association provided appropriate support (ORs = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.25-3.91). CONCLUSION: This study articulated the diverse needs of Nepali dentists during the COVID-19 pandemic. Demand-driven support should be provided in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Nepal/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Work ; 67(4): 779-782, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771013

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared novel coronavirus (COVID-19) infection a global pandemic due to the fast transmission of this disease worldwide. To prevent and slow the transmission of this contagious illness, the public health officials of many affected countries scrambled to introduce measures aimed at controlling its spread. As a result, unprecedented interventions/measures, including strict contact tracing, quarantine of entire towns/cities, closing of borders and travel restrictions, have been implemented by most of the affected countries including the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to share health care professionals' perspectives who are experiencing COVID19 firsthand in a foreign land. In addition, the role of the Saudi governance to combat the current situation is also discussed. DISCUSSION: Personal and previous experiences as related to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) by the authors has been compared to the current situation and how it affected our thoughts and management. A review of the evidence-based literature was conducted to investigate the demographics of the region; and to understand the awareness of the various tools that are available and how they were utilized in the present situation of pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Saudi Arabia has been challenged during the pandemic as are other countries.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Foreign Professional Personnel/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Contact Tracing , Dentists/psychology , Education, Dental , Education, Distance , Humans , Physical Distancing , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Travel
6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 393, 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly influenced the routine of healthcare workers. This study investigated the impact of the pandemic on dental practice and dentists' feelings in Latin America. METHODS: A survey was conducted with dentists from 11 Spanish-speaking Latin American countries in September-December 2020. Professionals were invited by email and via an open campaign promoted on social media. The questions investigated dental care routines, practice changes, and feelings about the pandemic. Descriptive statistics were used to identify frequencies and distributions of variables. Proportions were compared using chi-square tests. RESULTS: A total of 2127 responses were collected from a sample with diverse demographic, sex, work, and education characteristics. The impact of COVID-19 was considered high/very high by 60% of respondents. The volume of patients assisted weekly was lower compared with the pre-pandemic period (mean reduction = 14 ± 15 patients). A high rate of fear to contracting the COVID-19 at work was observed (85%); 4.9% of participants had a positive COVID-19 test. The main professional challenges faced by respondents were reduction in the number of patients or financial gain (35%), fear of contracting COVID-19 (34%), and burden with or difficulty in purchasing new personal protective equipment (22%). The fear to contracting COVID-19 was influenced by the number of weekly appointments. A positive test by the dentists was associated with their reports of having assisted COVID-19 patients. The most cited feelings about the pandemic were uncertainty, fear, worry, anxiety, and stress. Negative feelings were more prevalent for professionals who did not receive training for COVID-19 preventive measures and those reporting higher levels of fear to contract the disease. CONCLUSION: This multi-country survey indicated a high impact of the pandemic on dental care routines in Latin America. A massive prevalence of bad feelings was associated with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dentists , Emotions , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Oral Dis ; 27 Suppl 3: 651-654, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759225
9.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(3)2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742543

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The early information on both the speed and high morbidity rate and, above all, mortality triggered the symptoms of COVID-19-related panic and anxiety. Dentists were listed in the top five professions with the highest risk of transmission of the virus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the fear level of COVID-19 and sociodemographic variables in Polish dentists. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted via an online survey questionnaire with seven statements in the COVID-19 Fear Scale (FCV-19S). The online questionnaire was completed by 356 dentists. The SPSS and PQStat were used to analyze, validate, and assess correlations and logistic regression. Results: In the studied population of dentists, the perceived level of anxiety associated with COVID-19 should be considered relatively low. When the respondents had children, lived with the elderly, or looked after them, the observed level of anxiety was higher, and physical symptoms, such as sweating palms and increased heart rate, occurred. Conclusions: Studies concerning the anxiety level related to COVID-19 carried out among Polish dentists ascertained that the tested level of anxiety among dentists was relatively low. The COVID-19 Fear Scale (FCV-19S) adjusted to the Polish language requirements is a reliable tool that can be used effectively for analyzing the impact of any pandemic on the Polish-speaking population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Humans , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology
10.
Br Dent J ; 232(5): 303-306, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740430

ABSTRACT

Due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, internationally qualified dentists have been negatively impacted. This is due to the suspension of the Overseas Registration Exam (ORE) with no confirmation of any future dates. Similarly, UK dentistry was also affected by a significant increase in waiting lists all over the UK, with long waiting lists being present even before the pandemic. Due to these factors, many have highlighted and argued the need for internationally qualified dentists and urged the need to facilitate their registrations. Additionally, after Brexit, the government has introduced new immigration routes to attract overseas, highly educated human resources, so that they can contribute to different sectors in the UK. Considering these circumstances, there are a few alternatives to the ORE that could be introduced to facilitate the registration of internationally qualified dentists and to support NHS dental services. This paper suggests short- and long-term solutions to support the registration of internationally qualified dentists, considering that after two years, European-qualified dentists might need to undertake registration exams as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dentists , COVID-19/epidemiology , European Union , Humans , Pandemics , United Kingdom
11.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(3)2022 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732120

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic led to changes in population daily patterns. In order to adapt oral health promotion measures for future similar conditions, the main objective of the study was to assess changes in dental hygiene and eating and smoking habits during the government lockdown in Romania. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted immediately after the end of the lockdown and consisted of 800 adult subjects. Data collection was done via an online survey. Participants were divided into two groups: non-medical/dental practitioners (N-M/D group) and medical/dental practitioners (M/D group). Results: An increased use of dental floss from 27% (pre-lockdown) to 30.5% (during lockdown) was identified in the M/D group, while the manual toothbrush usage increased to 64.8% (during lockdown) from 61.7% (pre-lockdown) in the N-MD/group. No significant differences regarding toothbrushing frequency were observed in either group. A change in the number of daily snacks was identified in both groups (3-4 snacks per day: from 11% to 20.2% in the N-M/D group, from 13.1% to 22.2% in the M/D group). The consumption of sweets as a preferred snack was also noticed. A decrease of tobacco consumers was assessed in the lockdown period (from 66.6% to 60.4% in the M/D group, from 68.5% to 61.9% in the N-/M/D group). Conclusions: Oral habits were changed during the pandemic lockdown through the increase in the frequency of the consumption of snacks and sweets and the decrease in frequency of smokers. Only minor changes were observed in oral hygiene.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Habits , Humans , Oral Hygiene , Pandemics , Professional Role , Romania/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(1): 2039017, 2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730547

ABSTRACT

Assessment of safety of COVID-19 vaccines is an ongoing process. This study aims to explore long-term adverse events reported by physicians and dentists who received at least two COVID-19 vaccine doses. A group of physicians and dentists were invited to complete a validated questionnaire that was composed of items on: socio-demographics, medical history, administered vaccines, and long-term adverse events (LTAE). Data of a total of 498 practitioners were included. Age ranged from 22 to 71 years (mean age= 35.75 ± 11.74) with a female majority (N = 348, 69.9%). The most frequently administered vaccines were Pfizer-BioNtech, Sinopharm and AstraZeneca vaccines. A total of 80 (16.0%) participants reported LTAEs which were mainly fatigue, menstrual disturbances, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache (N = 32, 15, 8, 6, 4, and 4, respectively). There was no statistically significant association between LTAEs and: age, gender, or medical history (P > .05). The collective symptoms of fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, dizziness, and headache were significantly associated with Sinopharm vaccine (P = .04). This was further confirmed by general linear multivariate model analysis. Less than 20% of COVID-19 vaccine recipients may complain of LTAEs that are mostly fatigue-related. It seems that factors such as age, gender, and medical status play a negligible role in development of these AEs. On the other hand, Sinopharm vaccine showed the highest significant association with these AEs followed by AstraZeneca vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Adult , Aged , Arthralgia/chemically induced , Arthralgia/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Dentists , Dizziness , Fatigue/chemically induced , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Jordan , Middle Aged , Myalgia/chemically induced , Myalgia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Young Adult
13.
Indian J Dent Res ; 32(3): 330-335, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726312

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease-2019 COVID-19) pandemic has been sweeping around the globe and the cases have been reported in India since the second week of March, with Chennai being one of the most affected cities. Healthcare professionals, particularly the dental personnel have a higher risk of infection due to close face-to-face contact and the risk of inhalation of aerosolised particles. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice about COVID-19 among interns, post-graduate trainees and dental practitioners. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using Google forms among three groups: interns, post-graduate trainees and dental practitioners. Data obtained was analysed by Chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc test using SPSS IBM software. Results: Of total score of 9 for knowledge-based questions, the score obtained by interns, post-graduate trainees and practitioners were 7.2, 7.2 and 7.5, respectively, with no statistically significant difference among the groups (P = 0.24). Of total score of 4 for attitude-based questions, the score obtained by interns, post-graduate trainees and practitioners were 1.6, 2.0, and 1.9, respectively, with statistically significant difference among the groups (0.009). Of total score of 7 for practice-based questions, the score obtained by interns, post-graduate trainees and practitioners were 3.2, 3.3, and 3.1, respectively, with no statistically significant difference among them (P = 0.63). Conclusion: Though the knowledge about COVID-19 appeared adequate, the attitude and practice component needs improvement. Continuing dental education programs and webinars can be conducted to update the dental professionals about the protocols to be followed during COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Professional Role , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(10)2020 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725630

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the globe, becoming a major public health challenge not for China only, but also for countries around the world. Despite worldwide efforts to contain viral spread, the outbreak has not been stopped yet. Among healthcare personnel, dentists seem to be at elevated risk of exposure to COVID-19. This risk is even more serious in pediatric dentistry, since affected children, frequently, present an asymptomatic, mild or moderate clinical viral infection and, therefore, they may play a major role in community-based COVID-19 transmission. To date, despite no universal guidelines are available for dental procedures in pediatric dentistry during COVID-19 outbreak, routine dental practice should be postponed and only severe dental emergencies must be treated. In the case of a dental emergency, involving a pediatric patient, dentists should be aware of which recommended management protocol can be adopted during the practice to protect patient health, to safeguard their-self and to prevent viral transmission. The aim of this paper is to provide clinical recommendations, presenting a needed tool for dentists to allow a valid and safe how-to-do protocol. Pediatric dentists should keep a high level of awareness to help patients, minimize risk and prevent viral spread.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dentists/psychology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
15.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708330

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the COVID-19 vaccination experience among United States-based dental professionals and students: to understand their beliefs, concerns, safety and confidence levels, and side effects experienced after vaccination; striving to boost vaccination acceptability to curtail the pandemic. METHODS: An observational survey study approved by The University of Texas Health San Antonio Institutional Review Board was distributed to members of the School of Dentistry community using Qualtrics XM software. The survey was completed anonymously. Data were analyzed using R statistical computing software, χ2 test and Fisher's Exact test. RESULTS: Over 80% of all participants felt moderately to very safe working after the COVID-19 vaccine was made available, and more than 75% were moderately to very confident that the vaccine can protect them during the pandemic. At least 35% were moderately to very concerned about immediate and long-term side effects of the vaccine; despite the concerns, 94% received the vaccine. Side effects were more common after the second dose of the vaccine. Most common side effects were injection site pain, and general side effects of fatigue/tiredness, headache, muscle/body ache, and chills/fever. 74% reported no effect of the vaccine on daily activities, and the severity of side effects no worse than mild (about 60%). CONCLUSIONS: Majority of the participants felt safe and confident that the vaccine would protect them against COVID-19 infection. Sharing these findings and reliable information that the vaccine is safe and effective is paramount to fostering the vaccine uptake and curtailing the pandemic. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Findings of this study demonstrated the confidence of the UT Health San Antonio, School of Dentistry community that the benefits of the vaccines greatly outweigh the risks; boosting the vaccination acceptance while creating a COVID-19 free environment both for the academic dental setting and the community it serves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Dentists , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology
16.
Dent Med Probl ; 59(1): 27-36, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, dental professionals are at high risk of contracting the virus owing to their close proximity to patients. Using personal protective equipment (PPE) is necessary to avoid being infected as well as to avoid being the source of infection. Apart from physical limitations, also communication and work efficiency are affected by the barriers created by PPE. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess knowledge, attitude and practice regarding the challenges faced by dental practitioners in India due to the use of PPE as well as to discuss the ways of overcoming these barriers by dentists. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted during a period of 1 month. A Google Forms questionnaire was sent out; it included 12 questions regarding the use of PPE, changes in the diet and the work routine, the side effects of PPE, effects on communication and work efficiency, and the patients' attitude toward PPE. The obtained data was subjected to the statistical analysis with the use of the IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows software, v. 26.0. For all statistical tests, p < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant, keeping α error at 5% and ß error at 20%, thus giving a power to the study of 80%. RESULTS: A total of 390 dentists completed the questionnaire. The study revealed that 85% of the respondents agreed that wearing PPE affected their work efficiency and 89% experienced difficulty in communication. The majority of the participants experienced side effects, like profuse sweating, breathlessness, headaches, and skin irritation. CONCLUSIONS: It was proven that the current use of PPE not only makes communication harder, but also elevates anxiety among patients. Dentists have adapted themselves by switching to other means of communication, such as sending instructions by means of text messages/telemedicine, as well as taking breaks between patients, switching to a healthier diet, and exercising regularly, thus helping to minimize the adverse effects of PPE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Professional Role , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess the knowledge about guidelines related to COVID-19 infection control procedures among dental health care professionals (DHCPs) in the Jazan region. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving DHCPs (dental students, interns, and dentists) of the Jazan region between January and March 2021. A questionnaire with 35 items was developed and circulated online among the DHCPs. The dimensionality of the questionnaire was assessed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The level of awareness (LOA) was compared across the genders, level of professional experience, and exposure to guidelines. Participants were considered to have high LOA when they responded to 26 or more items correctly. RESULTS: A total of 363 DHCPs participated in the survey. The questionnaire was found to be valid and reliable. EFA revealed a distinct three-factor structure. Moreover, 61.2% of the respondents had high LOA related to COVID-19 infection prevention. Among those who had high LOA, dentists (65.5%) were relatively more than the students (62.5%) and interns (46.2%). Among the six guideline statements related explicitly to operative dentistry, more than 50% of the respondents were aware of 3 guideline statements, while less than 50% of the respondents were aware of the remaining statements. CONCLUSIONS: Most DHCP had a high LOA for general COVID-19 infection prevention and control guidelines. Dentists, males, and those who read the guidelines had higher LOA than their counterparts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Dent Med Probl ; 59(1): 5-11, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dentistry is one of the professions that are most exposed to the contagion with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19). However, the prevalence and positivity rates of COVID­19 are low in dentists, indicating that the current measures of infection control may be sufficient to prevent infection in dental settings. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to determine whether the preventive measures for COVID­19 during the mandatory social isolation were followed by dental students and dentists in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2020. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross­sectional study was conducted using anonymous virtual surveys in a convenience sample of 2,036 dental students and dentists from 21 Latin American and Caribbean coun­ tries. The variables were the preventive measures for COVID­19 and the sociodemographic characteristics. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: The final sample included 2,036 dental students and dentists. The self­perceived level of know­ ledge about COVID­19 was found to be associated with age, sex, body mass index (BMI), the type of aca­ demic training, having a specialty in the case of professionals, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The self­perceived level of concern regarding COVID­19 was associated with sex, BMI and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The number of days in the mandatory social isolation was associated with age, the type of academic training, having a specialty, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The confinement level was associated with age, sex, BMI, the type of academic training, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). Following the preven­ tive measures for COVID­19 was associated with age, the type of academic training, having a specialty, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). The use of face masks, hand washing and social distancing were associated with age, BMI, the type of academic training, the place of origin, and having met someone with COVID­19 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Dental students and dentists followed the preventive measures for COVID­19 during the mandatory social isolation period in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caribbean Region/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Students, Dental
20.
Br Dent J ; 232(2): 78-79, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655554

ABSTRACT

Little attention has been devoted to how dentists and dental teams may be able to contribute to reducing obesity, by screening for obesity in the population and offering weight management interventions to those who might benefit. Drawing on the NHS Making Every Contact Count campaign, this paper presents a case as to why dentists have an instrumental role in contributing to the global public heath effort to reduce obesity in both adults and children. This paper suggests how dentists might learn lessons from GPs and practice nurses about how to best address and raise the topic of weight management within patient consultations. Lastly, this report offers some tangible plans of action for further research on this question.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Obesity , Adult , Child , Dentists , Humans , Obesity/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation
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