Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211059348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571725

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating worldwide effect on mental health. Recent studies correlate the spreading of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with symptoms of depression, most prominent in postpartum women. Our systematic literature review scope is to identify the risk factors and predictors for postpartum depression (PPD) and describe the steps that should be taken to help postpartum women. This study will help clinicians, researchers, and policymakers to elucidate the predictors of PPD during this pandemic and prevent these adverse outcomes in future crises. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search by employing databases PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Embase to identify articles published before March 2021. About 463 publications were generated during our search process and from those, 36 were reviewed, summarized, and synthesized. Studies qualified the criteria if they (1) utilized qualitative or quantitative design, (2) explored the risk factors for PPD, and (3) were written in English. Quality evaluation of each study was achieved by using criteria set by Lincoln and Guba. RESULTS: Prevalence of depression symptoms ranged from 7% to 80.8% in postpartum women during the SARS-COV 2 pandemic. The risk factors for PPD were classified into 6 major categories: socio-demographic, psychological, pre-existing pathology, metabolic factors, previous events of miscarriage, and media misinformation. CONCLUSION: It is extremely vital to care for women's mental health during pregnancy and after childbirth during these unprecedented times. This review urges the need to design adequate interventions for this vulnerable population to prevent negative consequences of PPD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression, Postpartum , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518675

ABSTRACT

Objective: The conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively affect maternal mental health and the mother-infant relationship. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on depression, anxiety, and mother-infant bonding among women seeking treatment for postpartum depression (PPD).Methods: Baseline data collected in two separate randomized controlled trials of a psychoeducational intervention for PPD in the same geographic region, one prior to COVID-19 (March 2019-March 2020) and one during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-October 2020), were compared. Eligible participants had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 10, were ≥ 18 years of age, had an infant < 12 months old, and were fluent in English. Outcomes included PPD (EPDS), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]), and mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire [PBQ]). All were measured continuously and dichotomized at accepted clinical cutoffs.Results: Of the 603 participants (305 pre-COVID-19; 298 during COVID-19), mothers enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of symptoms of PPD (B = 1.35; 95% CI, 0.64 to 2.06; Cohen d = 0.31) and anxiety (B = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.72 to 2.32; Cohen d = 0.30). During COVID-19, women had 65% higher odds of clinically significant levels of depression symptoms (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.31) and 46% higher odds of clinically relevant anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in mother-infant bonding.Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that rates and severity of PPD and anxiety symptoms among women seeking treatment for PPD have worsened in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, treatment-seeking mothers have consistently maintained good relationships with their infants. Considering the difficulties women with PPD face when accessing treatment, it is important that strategies are developed and disseminated to safely identify and manage PPD to mitigate potential long-term adverse consequences for mothers and their families.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT03654261 and NCT04485000.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Mother-Child Relations/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Ontario/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Eur Psychiatry ; 64(1): e34, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New recommendations regarding the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during delivery have changed the maternal birth experience. In this study, we investigated the mental perceived impact of PPE use during delivery on the development of maternal postpartum depression (PPD) and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). METHODS: This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study concerning women who delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic first lockdown period in Israel. Postpartum women were approached and asked to complete a comprehensive online questionnaire. Impact of PPE was graded on a scale of 1-5, and Impact of PPE ≥4 was considered high. PPD and PTSS were assessed using the EPDS and City BiTS questionnaires. RESULTS: Of 421 parturients, 36 (9%) reported high Impact of PPE. Parturients with high Impact of PPE had significantly higher PPD and PTSS scores)EPDS 8.4 ± 5.8 vs. 5.7 ± 5.3; City BiTS 9.2 ± 10.3 vs. 5.8 ± 7.8, p < 0.05 for both). Following adjustment for socio-demographic and delivery confounders and fear of COVID-19 (using Fear of COVID19 scale), Impact of PPE remained positively correlated with PPD symptoms (ß = 0.103, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.029-1.006, p = 0.038). CONCLUSION: When examining the risk factors for developing postpartum PTSS-experiences during labor and PPE were found to be significant variables. As the use of PPE is crucial in this era of COVID-19 pandemic in order to protect both parturients and caregivers, creative measures should be taken in order to overcome the communication gap it poses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Postpartum Period/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression, Postpartum/diagnosis , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Israel , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Psychosom Med ; 83(4): 345-350, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218025

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: According to recent studies, the COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with an increased risk of mental health problems across many subpopulations including pregnant and postnatal women. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) in Chinese pregnant and postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study comprising 1309 pregnant and postpartum women across 12 provinces in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Depression was assessed using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression in pregnant and postpartum women was 27.43% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 25.01%-29.85%). Women who were worried about themselves or their babies being infected with COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.562, 95% CI = 1.670-3.929), and those who had delayed regular medical checkups (OR = 2.434, 95% CI = 1.580-3.750) were at higher risk of depression. Compared with those living in central and western parts of China, women living in northern (OR = 0.513, 95% CI = 0.326-0.807) and southeastern parts of China (OR = 0.626, 95% CI = 0.463-0.846) were less likely to have depression. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with an increased likelihood of mental health problems among pregnant and postnatal women. Over a quarter of the pregnant and postpartum women in China had depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative health impact of depression, preventive measures, regular mental health screening, and medical checkups are needed with the goal to reduce the risk of depression in this vulnerable population during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Psychosom Med ; 83(4): 345-350, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990959

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: According to recent studies, the COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with an increased risk of mental health problems across many subpopulations including pregnant and postnatal women. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms (depression hereafter) in Chinese pregnant and postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a multicenter, cross-sectional study comprising 1309 pregnant and postpartum women across 12 provinces in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Depression was assessed using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression in pregnant and postpartum women was 27.43% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 25.01%-29.85%). Women who were worried about themselves or their babies being infected with COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.562, 95% CI = 1.670-3.929), and those who had delayed regular medical checkups (OR = 2.434, 95% CI = 1.580-3.750) were at higher risk of depression. Compared with those living in central and western parts of China, women living in northern (OR = 0.513, 95% CI = 0.326-0.807) and southeastern parts of China (OR = 0.626, 95% CI = 0.463-0.846) were less likely to have depression. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with an increased likelihood of mental health problems among pregnant and postnatal women. Over a quarter of the pregnant and postpartum women in China had depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the negative health impact of depression, preventive measures, regular mental health screening, and medical checkups are needed with the goal to reduce the risk of depression in this vulnerable population during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e043057, 2020 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972718

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The absence of companionship during childbirth is known to be responsible for negative emotional birth experience, which can increase the risk of postpartum depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. The context of COVID-19 epidemic and the related confinement could increase the rate of negative experience and mental disorders. The main objective is to compare, in immediate post partum, the maternal sense of control during childbirth between a group of women who gave birth during confinement ('confinement' group) versus a group of women who gave birth after confinement but in the context of epidemic ('epidemic' group) versus a group of control women ('control' group; excluding confinement and epidemic context). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a national multicentre prospective cohort study conducted in four French maternity units. We expect to include 927 women in a period of 16 months. Women will be recruited immediately in post partum during three different periods constituting the three groups: 'confinement'; 'epidemic' and 'control' group. The maternal sense of control will be evaluated by the Labour Agentry Scale questionnaire completed immediately in post partum. Postnatal depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), post-traumatic stress disorder (Impact of Event Scale-Revised) and breast feeding (evaluative statement) will be evaluated at 2 months post partum. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study was approved by the French Ethics Committee, the CPP (Comité de Protection des Personnes) SUD OUEST ET OUTRE-MER IV on 16th of April 2020 with reference number CPP2020-04-040. The results of this study will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be presented at relevant conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04348929.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Parturition/psychology , Physical Distancing , Postpartum Period/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Female , France , Humans , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Research Design , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
7.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 20(1): 703, 2020 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Trauma, natural and man-made catastrophic events can be predictors of postpartum psychological distress. In a public health response due to coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, the Italian government imposed a lockdown from March 9 to May 3. This extraordinary situation may have been challenging for maternal psychological health. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive and post-traumatic stress symptoms in women giving birth during the Covid-19 pandemic and its associations with quarantine measures, obstetrical factors, and relational attachment style. METHODS: Women who gave birth in a high-volume obstetric/gynaecological medical centre located in an epidemic area during the Covid-19 pandemic (March 8 to June 15) were asked to complete an online survey about their childbirth experience and the perceived effect of the pandemic. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ) were administered to assess levels of postpartum depressive and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and relational style of attachment, respectively. Multivariate analysis was applied to identify associations between quarantine measures, childbirth experience, attachment style, and EPDS and IES-R scores. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 163 women (response rate 60.8%). The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.2% (EPDS cut-off score ≥ 11) and the PTSS rate was 42.9% (IES-R cut-off score ≥ 24). Dismissive and fearful avoidant attachment styles were significantly associated with the risk of depression and PTSS, respectively. Perceived pain during birth was a risk factor for postpartum depression. Perceived support provided by healthcare staff was a protective factor against depression and PTSS. Another protective factor against PTSS was quiet on the ward due to the absence of hospital visitors. CONCLUSION: This study reports a high prevalence of postpartum depressive and PTSS in women who gave birth during the Covid-19 pandemic. Postnatal psychological distress seemed to be associated more with the prenatal experience and other individual factors than with the pandemic hospital restrictions. Early detection during pregnancy of an insecure attachment style is fundamental to provide targeted preventive and therapeutic psychological interventions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression, Postpartum , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Psychological Distress , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Depression, Postpartum/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Parturition/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Psychology , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...