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1.
Pediatrics ; 148(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Depression is common, and suicide rates are increasing. Adolescent depression screening might miss those with unidentified suicide risk. Our primary objective in this study was to compare the magnitude of positive screen results across different approaches. METHODS: From June 2019 to October 2020, 803 mostly Medicaid-enrolled adolescents aged ≥12 years with no recent history of depression or self-harm were screened with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Modified for Adolescents (PHQ-9A) and the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions (ASQ) across 12 primary care practices. Two PHQ-9A screening strategies were evaluated: screening for any type of depression or other mental illness (positive on any item) or screening for major depressive disorder (MDD) (total score ≥10). RESULTS: Overall, 56.4% of patients screened positive for any type of depression, 24.7% screened positive for MDD, and 21.1% screened positive for suicide risk. Regardless of PHQ-9A screening strategy, the ASQ identified additional subjects (eg, 2.2% additional cases compared with screening for any type of depression or other mental illness and 8.3% additional cases compared with screening positive for MDD). Of those with ≥6 month follow-up, 22.9% screened positive for any type of depression (n = 205), 35.6% screened positive for MDD (n = 90), and 42.7% with a positive ASQ result (n = 75) had a depression or self-harm diagnosis or an antidepressant prescription. CONCLUSIONS: Suicide risk screening identifies cases not identified by depression screening. In this study, we underscore opportunities and challenges in primary care related to the high prevalence of depression and suicide risk. Research is needed regarding optimal screening strategies and to help clinicians manage the expected number of screening-identified adolescents.


Subject(s)
Depression/epidemiology , Mass Screening/methods , Primary Health Care/methods , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/drug therapy , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder, Major/drug therapy , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Male , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Suicide/prevention & control , Young Adult
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134803, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516698

ABSTRACT

Importance: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is associated with fatigue and sleep problems long after the acute phase of COVID-19. In addition, there are concerns of SARS-CoV-2 infection causing psychiatric illness; however, evidence of a direct effect is inconclusive. Objective: To assess risk of risk of incident or repeat psychiatric illness, fatigue, or sleep problems following SARS-CoV-2 infection and to analyze changes according to demographic subgroups. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study assembled matched cohorts using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink Aurum, a UK primary care registry of 11 923 499 individuals aged 16 years or older. Patients were followed-up for up to 10 months, from February 1 to December 9, 2020. Individuals with less than 2 years of historical data or less than 1 week follow-up were excluded. Individuals with positive results on a SARS-CoV-2 test without prior mental illness or with anxiety or depression, psychosis, fatigue, or sleep problems were matched with up to 4 controls based on sex, general practice, and year of birth. Controls were individuals who had negative SARS-CoV-2 test results. Data were analyzed from January to July 2021. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2 infection, determined via polymerase chain reaction testing. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cox proportional hazard models estimated the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result and subsequent psychiatric morbidity (depression, anxiety, psychosis, or self-harm), sleep problems, fatigue, or psychotropic prescribing. Models adjusted for comorbidities, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index. Results: Of 11 923 105 eligible individuals (6 011 020 [50.4%] women and 5 912 085 [49.6%] men; median [IQR] age, 44 [30-61] years), 232 780 individuals (2.0%) had positive result on a SARS-CoV-2 test. After applying selection criteria, 86 922 individuals were in the matched cohort without prior mental illness, 19 020 individuals had prior anxiety or depression, 1036 individuals had psychosis, 4152 individuals had fatigue, and 4539 individuals had sleep problems. After adjusting for observed confounders, there was an association between positive SARS-CoV-2 test results and psychiatric morbidity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.66-2.02), fatigue (aHR, 5.98; 95% CI, 5.33-6.71), and sleep problems (aHR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.64-3.78). However, there was a similar risk of incident psychiatric morbidity for those with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test results (aHR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.65-1.77) and a larger increase associated with influenza (aHR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.55-5.75). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of individuals registered at an English primary care practice during the pandemic, there was consistent evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with increased risk of fatigue and sleep problems. However, the results from the negative control analysis suggest that unobserved confounding may be responsible for at least some of the positive association between COVID-19 and psychiatric morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/etiology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep , Adult , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , England/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Primary Health Care , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
3.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 15: 4503-4525, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511886

ABSTRACT

Curcumin is a natural compound with great potential for disease treatment. A large number of studies have proved that curcumin has a variety of biological activities, among which anti-inflammatory effect is a significant feature of it. Inflammation is a complex and pervasive physiological and pathological process. The physiological and pathological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, atherosclerosis, COVID-19 and other research focus diseases are not clear yet, and they are considered to be related to inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin can effectively improve the symptoms of these diseases and is expected to be a candidate drug for the treatment of related diseases. This paper mainly reviews the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin, the inflammatory pathological mechanism of related diseases, the regulatory effect of curcumin on these, and the latest research results on the improvement of curcumin pharmacokinetics. It is beneficial to the further study of curcumin and provides new ideas and insights for the development of curcumin anti-inflammatory preparations.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Curcumin/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Depression/drug therapy , Humans
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112291, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT), a neuropeptide involved in mammal reproductive and prosocial behaviors, has been reported to interact with various stressor-provoked neurobiological changes, including neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter, and inflammatory processes. In view of disturbances in psychosocial relationships due to social isolation and physical distancing measures amid the COVID-19 pandemic, being one of the triggering factors for the recent rise in depression and anxiety, OXT is a potential candidate for a new antidepressant. METHODS: In this present study, we have aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (RE), extracted from distillation residue of rosemary essential oil, on central OXT level in the context of other stress biomarkers and neurotransmitter levels in mice models. Tail suspension test (TST) and elevated plus maze test (EPMT) following LPS injection were employed to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in mice, respectively. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with RE for seven days significantly improved behavior in TST and EPMT. Whole-genome microarray analysis reveals that RE significantly reversed TST stress-induced alterations in gene expressions related to oxytocinergic and neurotransmitter pathways and inflammatory processes. In both models, RE significantly increased central Oxt and Oxtr expressions, as well as OXT protein levels. RE also significantly attenuated stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone, brain and serum BDNF levels, and brain neurotransmitters levels in both models. INTERPRETATION: Altogether, our study is the first to report antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities of RE through modulating oxytocinergic system in mice brain and thus highlights the prospects of RE in the treatment of depressive disorders of psychosocial nature.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Oxytocin/metabolism , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Oxytocin/metabolism , Rosmarinus , Animals , Anti-Anxiety Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Anxiety Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/isolation & purification , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/metabolism , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Oxytocin/agonists , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Receptors, Oxytocin/agonists
5.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 43(3): 309-318, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression affects people feeling to be anxious, worried, and restless. They also lose interest in activities, concentrating and appetite, they finally may attempt suicide. Depression is the second chronic disease, as a source of the global burden of disease, after heart disease. Its prevalence elevated seven times during the COVID-19. AIM: The current study was designed to evaluate camphor neuroprotective role against rats' ciprofloxacin-induced depression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Depression was induced by administration of ciprofloxacin (50 mg/kg; orally) for 21 days. Wister albino male rats were divided into five groups. Group I (normal control): rats were given normal saline. Group II: rats received camphor (10 mg/kg; i.p.) for 21 days. Group III (depression control): rats received ciprofloxacin only. Groups IV and V: rats received camphor (5 and 10 mg/kg; i.p.) for 21 days concurrent with ciprofloxacin. Behavior tests as forced swimming test, activity cage, and rotarod were estimated. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers as malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), catalase, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) besides inflammatory biomarkers as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as neurotransmitters were determined. Finally, histopathological examination was done. RESULTS: Camphor increased catalase and Nrf-2 activities, decreased NO, MDA, TNF-α, TLR4 serum levels, and elevating brain contents of serotonin, dopamine, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and P190-RHO GTP protein with normal neuronal cells of the frontal cortex. CONCLUSION: Camphor has neuroprotective effect via modulation of Nrf-2 and TLR4 against ciprofloxacin-induced depression in rats.


Subject(s)
Camphor/pharmacology , Ciprofloxacin/adverse effects , Depression , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology , Depression/chemically induced , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Male , Rats , Rats, Wistar , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
6.
Pharmacopsychiatry ; 54(5): 215-223, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217715

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Depression is responsible for 800 000 deaths worldwide, a number that will rise significantly due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Affordable novel drugs with less severe side effects are urgently required. We investigated the effect of withanone (WN) from Withania somnifera on the serotonin system of wild-type and knockout Caenorhabditis elegans strains using in silico, in vitro, and in vivo methods. METHODS: WN or fluoxetine (as positive control drug) was administered to wild-type (N2) and knockout C. elegans strains (AQ866, DA1814, DA2100, DA2109, and MT9772) to determine their effect on oxidative stress (Trolox, H2DCFDA, and juglone assays) on osmotic stress and heat stress and lifespan. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was applied to investigate the effect of WN or fluoxetine on the expression of serotonin receptors (ser-1, ser-4, ser-7) and serotonin transporter (mod-5). The binding affinity of WN to serotonin receptors and transporter was analyzed in silico using AutoDock 4.2.6. RESULTS: WN scavenged ROS in wild-type and knockout C. elegans and prolonged their lifespan. WN upregulated the expression of serotonin receptor and transporter genes. In silico analyses revealed high binding affinities of WN to Ser-1, Ser-4, Ser-7, and Mod-5. LIMITATIONS: Further studies are needed to prove whether the results from C. elegans are transferrable to mammals and human beings. CONCLUSION: WN ameliorated depressive-associated stress symptoms by activating the serotonin system. WN may serve as potential candidate in developing new drugs to treat depression.


Subject(s)
Depression , Receptors, Serotonin/metabolism , Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Synaptic Transmission/drug effects , Withanolides/pharmacology , Animals , Animals, Genetically Modified , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/psychology , Caenorhabditis elegans , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Fluoxetine/pharmacology , Humans , Longevity/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Daru ; 29(1): 217-221, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130965

ABSTRACT

The social restrictions amid coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have posed a serious threat to mental health and have implications in the use of medications for mental health including antidepressants (ADs). This study investigated the trends in prescriptions and costs of various ADs in England during COVID-19 pandemic. National prescribing rates and net ingredient costs (NIC) of all ADs prescriptions during 2016 to 2020 were analyed. The total number of ADs prescriptions dispensed during COVID-19 pandemic (January to December 2020) were 78 million, 4 million more than in 2019 that costed NHS England £ 139 million more than in 2019. Sertraline, an SSRI antidepressant drug, alone accounted for an extra £113 million during 2020 than in 2019. The peak dispensing for ADs was observed in March 2020 while the total costs for AD drugs peaked in April 2020. The rising prescription costs for ADs during COVID-19 pandemic is a potential cause of concern, in particular the increasing use in adolescents and younger adults needs attention, who are at a higher risk of life-threatening adverse drug reactions.


Subject(s)
Antidepressive Agents/economics , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Costs/trends , Drug Prescriptions/economics , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/economics , Depression/epidemiology , England/epidemiology , Humans
10.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 272: 113952, 2021 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087047

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: There are plant species used in the Mexican traditional medicine for the empirical treatment of anxiety and depression. AIM OF THE STUDY: This work assessed the prevalence of self-medication with medicinal plants and the prevalence of the concomitant use of prescribed psychiatric drugs and medicinal plants for treating symptoms associated with anxiety and depression during the Covid-19 lockdown in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The suspected adverse reactions associated with drug-herb interactions were assessed. The factors associated with self-medication, the concomitant use of herb-drug combinations, and the presence of adverse reactions due their combined use is also reported. The study was descriptive and cross-sectional using an online questionnaire conducted among population with symptoms associated with anxiety and depression (n = 2100) from seven states of central-western Mexico. RESULTS: The prevalence of the use of herbs (61.9%) and the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations (25.3%) were associated with being diagnosed with mental illness [OR:2.195 (1.655-2.912)] and the use of psychiatric medications [OR:307.994 (178.609-531.107)], respectively. The presence of adverse reactions (n = 104) by the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations was associated with being unemployed [p = 0.004, OR: 3.017 (1.404-6.486)]. CONCLUSION: Health professionals should be aware if their patients concomitantly use medicinal plants and psychiatric drugs. Public health campaigns should promote the possible adverse reactions that might produce the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations for mental illnesses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/drug therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/drug therapy , Pandemics , Plant Preparations/adverse effects , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug Interactions , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Plants, Medicinal , Prevalence , Psychotropic Drugs/adverse effects , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Self Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/psychology , Young Adult
11.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(4): e28, 2021 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1048950

ABSTRACT

Hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-infected patients suffer from both physical impairments and mental stress. Respiratory insufficiency and cardiovascular disturbances require most of the intensive care interventions, but they are also accompanied by depressive conditions, sadness and fear of dying. Sedatives are mostly respiratory and cardiovascular depressants and do not provide resistance to the pro-inflammatory burst induced by the virus. Ketamine is a unique and safe drug that enables well-controlled sedation and anesthesia, attenuates depression and mitigates suicidal thoughts, without depressing respiratory or cardiovascular mechanics. This brief communication highlights the benefits potentially provided by ketamine to patients hospitalized for COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/drug therapy , Ketamine/therapeutic use , Stress, Psychological/drug therapy , Anesthesia , Anxiety/drug therapy , Critical Care , Depression/complications , Hemodynamics , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives , Immune System , Respiratory Insufficiency , Stress, Psychological/complications , Suicidal Ideation , Treatment Outcome
12.
Subst Abus ; 41(4): 409-412, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-843081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging research suggests the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant increase in self-reported isolation and loneliness in a large proportion of the population. This is particularly concerning given that isolation and loneliness are associated with increased cannabis use, as well as using cannabis to cope with negative affect. Objective: We investigated whether self-isolation due to COVID-19 and using cannabis to cope with depression were unique and/or interactive predictors of cannabis use during the pandemic, after controlling for pre-pandemic levels of cannabis use. Method: A sample of 70 emerging adults (mean age = 23.03; 34.3% male) who used both alcohol and cannabis pre-pandemic completed measures of cannabis use (i.e., quantity x frequency) and a novel COVID-19 questionnaire between March 23 and June 15, 2020. Pre-pandemic cannabis use levels had been collected four months earlier. Results: Linear regressions indicated self-isolation and coping with depression motives for cannabis use during the pandemic were significant predictors of pandemic cannabis use levels after accounting for pre-pandemic use levels. There was no interaction between coping with depression motives and self-isolation on cannabis use during the pandemic. Conclusions: Those who engaged in self-isolation were found to use 20% more cannabis during the pandemic than those who did not. Our results suggest that self-isolation is a unique risk factor for escalating cannabis use levels during the pandemic. Thus, self-isolation may inadvertently lead to adverse public health consequences in the form of increased cannabis use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Marijuana Smoking/epidemiology , Self Medication/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Canada/epidemiology , Depression/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110140, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670383

ABSTRACT

While researchers are struggling to develop a vaccine for coronavirus disease, it is important to evolve effective therapeutic strategies to save lives. The majority of coronavirus disease deaths are due to pneumonia. Mostly, stress and depression are associated with coronavirus disease infection and thus, resulting in weakening of patients' immune response and hence, more severe respiratory symptoms or even death. We propose using a class of antidepressants named selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for their reported potential antiviral effect, modulatory effect of respiratory symptoms, antioxidant properties and immunoregulatory effects beside their main action as antidepressant. In addition, the low cost of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors might add a benefit for coronavirus disease patients.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/pharmacology , Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Humans , Immune System , Inflammation , Lung/drug effects , Models, Theoretical , Risk , Serotonin/metabolism , Sertraline/pharmacology , Stress, Psychological
15.
Blood Cells Mol Dis ; 85: 102478, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640891

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: An analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic impact in the Spanish Gaucher Disease (GD) community is presented here. PATIENTS & METHODS: The Spanish GD foundation (FEETEF) surveyed 113 GD patients from March 30 to April 27; all patients provided a verbal consent. RESULTS: 110 surveys were analyzed. The median age was 47 years old (y.o.), 31 patients were ≥ 60 y.o.; and 34% of patients reported comorbidities. 46% (51/110) of patients were treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), 48 of them at hospitals; 45.1% (45/110) were on substrate reduction therapy (SRT) and 9% (10/110) receive no therapy. 25% (11/48) of ERT-hospital-based patients reported therapy interruptions, while SRT-patients did not report missing doses. No bone crises were reported. However, 50% (55/110) of patients reported being worried about their predisposition to a severe SARS-COV-2 infection and 29% (16/55) of them took anxiolytics or antidepressants for this. While 6 patients reported to have contact with an infected person, another two confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections were reported in splenectomyzed patients, one of them (a 79-year-old diabetic) died. CONCLUSIONS: One quarter of the patients treated at hospitals reported dose interruptions. Home-based therapy may need to be considered in order to minimize the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections , Enzyme Replacement Therapy , Gaucher Disease/drug therapy , Glucosylceramidase/therapeutic use , Home Care Services, Hospital-Based , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Comorbidity , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Disease Susceptibility , Enzyme Replacement Therapy/methods , Female , Gaucher Disease/psychology , Gaucher Disease/surgery , Glucosylceramidase/supply & distribution , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Splenectomy/adverse effects , Young Adult
16.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 49(8): 101848, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624693

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) could harm the reproductive and sexual health of both males and females. This could be through psychological, immunological, or systemic effects. In this article, we tried to elucidate the mechanisms that could explain the current and future genital affection of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Health , Antidepressive Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Depression/drug therapy , Female , Genitalia/blood supply , Humans , Libido/drug effects , Libido/physiology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/drug therapy
17.
Reprod Biomed Online ; 41(3): 425-427, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548165

ABSTRACT

RESEARCH QUESTION: What is the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on infertility patients? DESIGN: An anonymous cross-sectional online survey was sent to patients who attended a large university-affiliated infertility practice in the USA between 1 January 2019 and 1 April 2020. At three different time-points respondents were asked to note their top three stressors, from a list of 10 commonly reported life stressors. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 10,481 patients, with 3604 responses (response rate 34%) received. A total of 2202 non-pregnant female respondents were included in the final analysis. One-third of respondents had a prior diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, and 11% reported taking anxiolytic medications; over one-quarter had a prior diagnosis of a depressive disorder and 11% reported taking antidepressant medications. At all three time-points, infertility was noted to be the most frequent top stressor. Coronavirus was noted to be the third most common stressor among the respondents in early March but, at the time of writing, is similar to that of infertility (63% and 66%, respectively). A total of 6% of patients stated that infertility treatment, including IVF, should not be offered during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: Despite the unprecedented global pandemic of COVID-19, causing economic and societal uncertainty, the stress of infertility remains significant and is comparable a stressor to the pandemic itself.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Infertility/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Infertility/therapy , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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